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  1. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2012
    Location: United States
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    I'm using iSkysoft media converter, and I'm able to rip a standard DVD to a resolution of 1920 x 1080. But is this really high def? I know if you play an SD DVD in a DVD player it will be upconverted. But I normally rip DVD's and then stream them from my iMac.

    So, are you really getting high definition videos from a standard definition DVD when you rip them to a resolution of 720 or 1080?
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  2. No, you have upscaled standard definition. If you had a real high def version to compare to the difference would be obvious.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2003
    Location: West Texas
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    They will have a "high definition" resolution, but there is no magic conversion program that will give you better video quality than the original. In fact, you will lose some visual quality while converting.
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  4. Don't forget, your TV or DVD player upscales to HD any time you watch SD material. Sometimes you can do better in software -- especially with animated material.
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  5. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2003
    Location: West Texas
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    An argument can be made that converting to HD resolution is not always worse than the upscaling done by one's player or tv, but the conversion program mentioned does not lend much support for that argument. The crapware converters are set up for speed rather than quality, though some can be adjusted slightly.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2012
    Location: Australia
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    I upscale all my animation to 1080p for my archive versions, although for the most part I can't tell the difference between my CFR16/14 up-scaled versions and the CRF18 SD versions when watching them on my WDTV. Of course watching them up close through VLC is a completely different story, and there are significant problems when I try to down-scale the things again.
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  7. Originally Posted by ndjamena View Post
    I upscale all my animation to 1080p for my archive versions
    What do you use for that? I do the same with some animated material. Typically an AviSynth sequence like:

    Code:
    # after cleaning a 720x480 4:3 SD source
    nnedi3_rpow2(2,cshift="Spline64Resize", fwidth=960, fheight=720)
    aWarpSharp2(depth=5)
    Sharpen(0.2)
    nnedi3_rpow2(2,cshift="Spline64Resize", fwidth=1440, fheight=1080)
    aWarpSharp2(depth=5)
    Sharpen(0.5, 0.2)
    The exact values and sequence will vary depending on the source. Sometimes a Toon() tossed in.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
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    Originally Posted by zBernie View Post
    I'm using iSkysoft media converter, and I'm able to rip a standard DVD to a resolution of 1920 x 1080.
    Actually to be technical, you are ripping and only then converting to 1920x1080. Ripping technically only means the process of copying from a disc (CD, DVD, BD) to a hard drive. Your rips will be in standard definition. iSkysoft, whoever they are, is unfortunately using the term in a way which is technically wrong but in common use to refer to the conversion part of it as "ripping".

    Can you do this type of conversion? Yes. Should you do it? Probably not. Even the Hollywood studios don't get great results at this and they've got access to much better tools for this sort of thing than consumers do. However it's your life so if you are asking, I'm assuming you've tried it and are probably OK with the final result. If so then do whatever pleases you.
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2012
    Location: Australia
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    Code:
    FastLineDarkenMOD2(thinning=0, luma_cap = 255, threshold=4)
    TemporalSoften(16,4,4,12,2)
    NNEDI3_Resize16(1440, 1080)
    awarpsharp2(Thresh=128, Type=1, blur=8, depth=5)
    deen("a2d",4,5,6)
    TemporalSoften(16,4,4,12,2)
    toon()
    FFT3dFilter(sigma=1.0, bt=5, bw=64, bh=64, ow=32, oh=32, sharpen=0.4, plane=4)
    This is what it is currently, FFT3DFilter was only added recently because I only just discovered what it's options were for. Deen was added a month or so ago. I've added a Dup() now but haven't had a chance to use it yet and may switch to Dupped() instead. All I've used this on recently was Volume 4 of Ben 10: Omniverse. I'm encoding Beware The Batman at the moment but I'm using my 1080 'film' preset for that, which is just the NNEDI3_Resize16, a slow LSFMOD and the FFT3DFilter, and I used 1080 film for Beast Wars before that. I'm half way through Get Smart at the moment too, but that doesn't get an upscale. I work on the theory that I can throw as many filters at Cell Animation as I like, so there's no point in being nice on the upscale. Plus they compress so well I might as well. Oddly, Beware the Batman upscaled to 1080x1920 and encoded at CRF16 actually comes out smaller than the original DVD rip despite using the same Audio and Subtitles. And as I said, if I load both the upscaled and SD cell animation versions into VLC and compare them closely, my version really does look MUCH better.
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  10. Thanks for that. I'll check out nnedi3_resize16().
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  11. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2012
    Location: Australia
    Search Comp PM
    The Temporal Softens and Deen was mostly my attempt to limit that horrible crawling discolouration I tend to get after I've denoised old animation and aren't actually necessary (I've noticed my encodes have gone softer since I added Deen), the FFT3dFilter is simply to help with compression rather than to make it look better. I tried increasing the resolution up in steps on the Original TMNT and it worked rather nicely, but I was saving to UT and downsizing the 720p versions to make the SD version pretty much destroyed the picture. Transformers was the first to get the Deen treatment, Madman Australia made a mess of their release and I fixed it up as best I could, but I use the same batch file to do all my encodes so every animation since has been subjected to it. Ben 10: Omniverse doesn't seem to have suffered from it too much. I don't suppose there is a perfect method to encode ANYTHING so I don't suppose it matters.
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