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  1. Hi guys,

    I'm a newbie in video stuff and I need your help.
    I have 2 Panasonic camcorders:
    - HDC TM-700
    - HDC SD1
    And I need to get the video signal from them and to stream it and capture (or record) it in the same time.
    What kind of video equipment should I use in this case?

    I need the output signal for capture (record) to be HD or FULL HD. For streaming is fine just SD.

    Many thanks in advance!
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
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    Why do you need to stream? And why both at the same time?

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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    Join Date: Oct 2004
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Why do you need to stream? And why both at the same time?
    This is a new member. While anything is possible, I strongly suspect that when gimi says "stream" he doesn't know the technical term to use and is trying to describe sending the signal from the camcorder to a PC. You know, like people will use erroneously use "CD" to refer to DVD or BD discs.

    Sorry, gimi, but I can't help with camcorder stuff due to lack of knowledge. Maybe now that I have hopefully cleared up what you mean you can get some help.
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  4. Hi Scott,

    I used to film public events, like conferences or public assemblies. For this now I use 2 camcorders and record the full HD videos on SD cards. But is hard to film and after to realize the video montage. In the same time I use one of the camera for web-streaming.
    I want to make my work easier. To get the signal from both cameras into a mixer or switcher. And from that mixer / switcher to make both actions - streaming and recording the output video.
    I don't know what kind of mixer or video equipment to use in this case.

    Please help!
    Thanks.
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  5. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
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    Well, I'm glad I asked and that you answered in the way that you did. Some modern cams DO support streaming, though it is usually at a premium, in the sense that they either charge extra for it (pro & semi-pro cams) or they incorporated it into the main features sometimes to the detriment of other features (consumer cams), particularly for wireless streaming.

    However, it doesn't sound like you particularly need streaming FROM the camera. Rather, you need the cams' signals to go to a video switcher/mixer and then the output of that can be stored (tape, disc, hdd, card) or streamed.

    Mixers also would charge extra for streaming, but in their case, it just makes more sense to tack on a separate hardware streaming encoder box at one of the outputs. Since the great majority of cams (including most consumer cams) still have Analog Composite SD video (and audio) outputs, for economy's sake, it makes sense to take the analog outs from both of those cams (using their supplied "AV multi-connector" cable) and use them as inputs to an analog switcher. You can use a display with most and do whatever switching/mixing/overlaying, etc (incl. text) on them while previewing on the display and then send the output to a recorder and/or the streaming encoder. I see on cursory research some hardware encoders for as low as ~$150USD (Grandstream GXV3504 IP Video Encoder).

    You would still have the SD-card encoded HD files being recorded by each camera, which you could later then edit along the lines of the streamed/recorded SD output.

    This is all possible, just depends on your budget.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  6. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    However, it doesn't sound like you particularly need streaming FROM the camera. Rather, you need the cams' signals to go to a video switcher/mixer and then the output of that can be stored (tape, disc, hdd, card) or streamed.
    Thank you for tips.

    I searched over internet and now I need to decide which mixer to buy. Regarding my budget I need to decide between 2: Roland V4-EX or ATEM Television Studio.
    What do you say about Roland V-4EX?
    http://www.rolandsystemsgroup.com/products/100124#.U19Y6PmSwus

    Or a switcher from Blackdesign (ATEM Television Studio)?
    http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/atemtelevisionstudio/

    Which is best?
    Or do you have a better solution?

    Thanks in advance!
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  7. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    OK, so looks at first glance like both of those have h.264-encoded streaming output, in addition to whatever else output options they have, so you wouldn't need the outboard encoder.

    The Roland seems much more FX-oriented (and geared towards corporate/religious crowd) than the BMD ATEM. I know the BMD is of quite good quality, just not familiar with the Roland (though they usually make good stuff overall).

    However, the BMD, while being 10bit capable (as opposed to Roland's 8bit) and having 6 inputs vs. Roland's 4, really seems geared toward higher-end productions: it doesn't include composite or S-video connection, only HDMI & SDI (with one USB connection). So, unless your cams also had HDMI connections in addition to component/composite/S-video analog A/V connections, you would need to factor into things the cost of analog->HDMI adapters for each cam.

    So, again, depends on your budget.
    AFA better solution, no, but then I am not doing research for this right now, and my knowledge on the "current equipment options" would only be valid through one or two product cycles, and for the specific needs that I do spec out at the time anyway. You basically have to "start over" every time you pursue equipment procurement.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  8. Thanks Scot ... your advices are very useful for me.

    I have 2 more questions:
    First about the cables - can you recommend me a component/composite/S-video analog A/V cable that I can use? I need one at 30 meters (100 feet) or a HDMI cable at the same length that I can use to connect between video cams and mixer - or maybe an converter from analog to HDMI.
    Another question is about limitations - those cables have limitations regarding loosing video signal quality?

    Many thanks for answers!
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  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    I do NOT recommend HDMI at such a length. Composite is cheap and common to find at that lengths, though usually with RG-59 coaxial cable & BNC connectors. Add BNC<->RCA adapters on ends and you should be good. Cable lengths depend on 3 things: resistance, capacitance and inductance. Those determine what the bandwidth/freq.response of signals using the cable will be like compared to length. There are plenty of examples on the 'net explaining these relationships, but a simple search would tell you that composite analog SD video running on 75ohm RG-59 coaxial cable can go ~250-300 meters before losing too much high frequency response. However, this can depend also on the quality of the connectors & termination. I myself have strung cable of such type in studios and concert halls out to ~100meters without any difficulty.

    SD Digital and HD digital have higher and higher bandwidth requirements respectively than analog, which is part of the reason you would have only those short lengths (usually less than ~10-15meters) for HDMI (though it would be possible to include "repeater amps" to re-condition the signal and pipe it further down the line, if necessary, but only for $$$).

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  10. Thank you for everything!
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