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  1. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2013
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    I've noticed this for a while that all the blu-ray release of the HD remaster of old anime has a saturation boost and a expand of level range to fit the HD range. However, I believed that older anime were natively produced to fit into the SD range , therefore it's saturation and level range should be kept within the SD range no matter what the future medium are.

    Is there a reason why the production companies do this? Is this correct?
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
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    Originally Posted by llansing View Post
    I've noticed this for a while that all the blu-ray release of the HD remaster of old anime has a saturation boost and a expand of level range to fit the HD range. However, I believed that older anime were natively produced to fit into the SD range , therefore it's saturation and level range should be kept within the SD range no matter what the future medium are.

    Is there a reason why the production companies do this? Is this correct?


    There is no difference between "SD" and "HD" levels in terms of production "SD" ITU Rec.601 or "HD" ITU Rec.709 transfer functions. The black and white points are the same, and saturation does not change. So there might be another reason, but it's not because of "HD"
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
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    I can't give you a "Company X did bad thing Y in case Z" kind of statement. But I can make general statements.

    I bought a special 2 DVD set from Hong Kong where a longish movies (about 3 hours if I remember correctly) was on 2 DL DVD discs so that it could better use the space for DTS audio. The DTS audio on the disc was that half bit rate DTS of 700-something Kbps. The 2 discs were barely over 5 GB each. Not really sure what exactly was going on here. Incompetence? Screwing over the customers by suckering them into buying the 2 disc set?

    I've known of a Hong Kong production house that has access to 24 fps masters of old films, yet it routinely uses 24 fps converted to 25 fps PAL and it takes those PAL versions and converts them to NTSC. A Russian production house was known to use PAL masters of Russian films and just convert those to NTSC on DVD rather than go back to the original 24 fps sources and convert those.

    American consumers expect 5.1 audio or better for EVERYTHING and perceive it to be crap if it's not, so even old mono film soundtracks that cannot be made into true 5.1 audio are routinely released as 5.1. Whether they are really mono or faked into 5.1 or have new non-original foley effects added to make them 5.1 probably depends on the movie.

    Edge enhancement, even when not necessary, is routinely done by a lot of studios.

    Sometimes DVDs were made from color faded prints so the "saturation boost" you see may be an attempt to get back to the true original colors. Or it may be completely unnecessary.
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  4. Member
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    Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post

    There is no difference between "SD" and "HD" levels in terms of production "SD" ITU Rec.601 or "HD" ITU Rec.709 transfer functions. The black and white points are the same, and saturation does not change. So there might be another reason, but it's not because of "HD"
    This is what I saw when observing with vectorscope and rgb parade.

    Name:  vectorscope.jpg
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    In the vectorscope, the inner squares represent the legal saturation range for SD materials, the outer squares are for HD. What they did was that they boost the saturation into the HD zones, making colors like red looks blown out.


    Name:  rgb_parade.jpg
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    Above is a typical rgb parade for a old anime in dvd, the black level in respect is almost always lie above 10, while for the HD remaster, they would pull the black down so it hits 0.
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  5. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
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    Originally Posted by llansing View Post
    In the vectorscope, the inner squares represent the legal saturation range for SD materials, the outer squares are for HD. What they did was that they boost the saturation into the HD zones, making colors like red looks blown out.
    That's not what they indicate for the vectorscope . Those are 75% and 100% bars, not "SD" vs "HD"

    HD or SD have no bearing on the saturation or levels . They are independent concepts

    eg. You can HD material that is over or under saturated. You can have SD material that is over or under saturated
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  6. vanished El Heggunte's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2009
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    <O.T.>

    I really don't see the point of "remastering old anime to Hi-Definition"

    ACTUAL «old anime» was intended to be seen on a 4:3 display, with 480 lines of vertical resolution

    </O.T.>
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  7. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
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    Originally Posted by El Heggunte View Post
    <O.T.>

    I really don't see the point of "remastering old anime to Hi-Definition"

    ACTUAL «old anime» was intended to be seen on a 4:3 display, with 480 lines of vertical resolution

    </O.T.>
    A lot of it was shot on 35mm film which is obviously better than HD. The question on any given program is how much was manipulated or composited in SD video after the fact.
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