VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8
Thread
  1. I just got the DVDFab Media Player 2 software and I wanted to inform you it is a nice alternative to watch protected movie backups. Personally I have my PC hooked up to my Home Theater via my Geforce GTX-660 video card with a HDMI cable and the picture and audio are both great and without getting affected by Cinavia protection. I was able to watch a few movie backups without getting the Cinavia message that I wasn't able to watch with my standalone Blu-ray player previously. The media player has nice features to configure output mode, output device and speaker configuration. As a result of configuring the player, the audio has great quality comparable to the one of standalone Blu-ray player. For some time I was looking for a way to listen to my videos in my Home Theater using my old media players and still be able to listen to my programs via PC without much success. The ability of this player to set audio source made that possible finally. So there you have it people, a nice alternative to watch protected movie backups without getting an error.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member fritzi93's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2003
    Location: U.S.
    Search Comp PM
    I got DVDFab Media Player on giveawayoftheday a few months ago, along with a "key". I thought it wasn't half bad, then up pops a notification that the trial had run out. Some give away that was!

    I don't think it's worth the money, but hey, it's better than the later versions of PowerDVD. I mean versions 9 and later.

    Personally, if you don't want to pay for TMT (the best, for sure), I think a bundled version of PowerDVD (v.8 or earlier) is adequate, and lots of people got install discs with their BD burners. So it shouldn't be hard to find one. A simple re-naming of a couple files in the program folder disables updating and the nag screens. No Cinavia nor virtual drive lockout. This will work for any backup, as all advanced BD+ protections will have been removed.
    Pull! Bang! Darn!
    Quote Quote  
  3. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: USA
    Search Comp PM
    I settle for the free VSO player for BD playback on my PC. The downside is that you need a decryption program such as AnyDVD HD or similar. But that's still cheaper than TMT.

    Even cheaper is a standalone BD player. I have a Samsung for problem BDs. Either way, I've never got a 'Cinavia message.' I guess I watch the wrong BDs.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date: Jan 2012
    Location: North America
    Search Comp PM
    I don't think a computer's BluRay Burner Drives pay attention to Cinavia anyway. Yes? No? So using a playback program that doesn't AND connecting the PC's video-card via HDMI to the TV is a great alternative to finding older BluRay players that were manufactured before the Cinavia requirement was enforced on manufacturers.

    (How can the Standards Committee insist on this? How much can they pay these manufacturers to join in?!!)
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by OllieTSB View Post
    I don't think a computer's BluRay Burner Drives pay attention to Cinavia anyway. Yes? No? So using a playback program that doesn't AND connecting the PC's video-card via HDMI to the TV is a great alternative to finding older BluRay players that were manufactured before the Cinavia requirement was enforced on manufacturers.

    (How can the Standards Committee insist on this? How much can they pay these manufacturers to join in?!!)
    Who says they would need to pay them? Cinavia compliance is a requirement for obtaining an AACS license. No AACS license normally means software or hardware with no ability to decrypt commercially produced original Blu-Ray discs. Since most people buying a hardware or software Blu Ray player expect it to be able to play original commercial Blu-Ray discs, it would be hard to sell one one that can't in many parts of the world.

    In the past DVDFab never needed to care about obtaining AACS licensing. They couldn't be sued for patent violation or copyright infringement. They still can't be sued, but may need to care for another reason. As someone in another thread pointed out, many Chinese workers have jobs making licensed DVD and Blu-Ray players for export and the Chinese government would not want those jobs to go elsewhere.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 26th Mar 2014 at 11:17.
    Quote Quote  
  6. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2003
    Location: West Texas
    Search PM
    DVDFab Media Player is vastly improved over their first few releases, but I still prefer TMT for Blu-ray playback. I have an old version of TMT 5 released prior to their implementation of Cinavia detection and refuse to update it. Works brilliantly for ripped Blu-ray, which is the only way I watch them. I never play from the discs.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    In the past DVDFab never needed to care about obtaining AACS licensing. They couldn't be sued for patent violation or copyright infringement. They still can't be sued, but may need to care for another reason. As someone in another thread pointed out, many Chinese workers have jobs making licensed DVD and Blu-Ray players for export and the Chinese government would not want those jobs to go elsewhere.
    I understand what you're trying to say, but I disagree with your wording. We had recent reports that DVDFab was in fact sued in a US court and lost by default by failing to show up. This led to their original website getting seized and them having to move to a China hosted website. It might not be in Hollywood's interest to sue in China given the legal system is considered corrupt and subservient to the wishes of the Chinese Communist Party but I don't know that I'd say that they can't do it. Hollywood can only push so far since outside of Sony they are not in the electronics business and non-Sony companies will not move production to more expensive locations simply because it makes movie studios happier. Plus, the studios are already facing a vast Chinese market that is protectionist about domestic films and limits foreign releases. If Hollywood goes too far, the Chinese government could simply shut the door on all Hollywood films in response and I am guessing that the studios would rather lose the decryption war and keep the business in China than "win" the war at the cost of finding China to be a closed market to US films. Honestly, the number of people who decrypt movies is really fairly low. Hollywood likes to exaggerate losses but many people simply do not EVER decrypt movies they buy because they don't want to spend the time necessary to do it.
    Quote Quote  
  8. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by jman98 View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    In the past DVDFab never needed to care about obtaining AACS licensing. They couldn't be sued for patent violation or copyright infringement. They still can't be sued, but may need to care for another reason. As someone in another thread pointed out, many Chinese workers have jobs making licensed DVD and Blu-Ray players for export and the Chinese government would not want those jobs to go elsewhere.
    I understand what you're trying to say, but I disagree with your wording. We had recent reports that DVDFab was in fact sued in a US court and lost by default by failing to show up. This led to their original website getting seized and them having to move to a China hosted website. It might not be in Hollywood's interest to sue in China given the legal system is considered corrupt and subservient to the wishes of the Chinese Communist Party but I don't know that I'd say that they can't do it. Hollywood can only push so far since outside of Sony they are not in the electronics business and non-Sony companies will not move production to more expensive locations simply because it makes movie studios happier. Plus, the studios are already facing a vast Chinese market that is protectionist about domestic films and limits foreign releases. If Hollywood goes too far, the Chinese government could simply shut the door on all Hollywood films in response and I am guessing that the studios would rather lose the decryption war and keep the business in China than "win" the war at the cost of finding China to be a closed market to US films. Honestly, the number of people who decrypt movies is really fairly low. Hollywood likes to exaggerate losses but many people simply do not EVER decrypt movies they buy because they don't want to spend the time necessary to do it.
    I'll agree that the number of people copying discs they legitimately own for personal use is small. However the number of people buying/downloading warez and ripping rented movies is probably worth being concerned about. I'll admit that not all of those people would buy legitimate copies if the warez supply dried up or they lost the abiltity to easily copy rentals, but a few more sales is preferable to a few less sales.

    Counterfeiting and bootlegging is such a huge industry in China and sales of legitimate discs are so small by comparison that I wonder why studios even bother to release anything there at all. They can't be making much money at it.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 26th Mar 2014 at 12:47. Reason: left something out
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads