VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5
Thread
  1. Anonymous1
    Guest
    ..
    Last edited by Anonymous1; 23rd Apr 2016 at 09:16.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Basically you have to decide wether to go for ANSI or Unicode (UTF) encoding. If you save subs from Subtitle Edit (SE) using 1252 as Encoding they will show up properly in Subtitle Workshop (SW). If you import them again to SE after perhaps using them in SW SE will automatically choose 1252 as Encoding.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Anonymous1
    Guest
    ..
    Last edited by Anonymous1; 23rd Apr 2016 at 09:16.
    Quote Quote  
  4. For SE. For Notepad select ANSI as encoding in bottom of save window.
    Attached Images  
    Quote Quote  
  5. Banned
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
    Search Comp PM
    Most subtitle programs are written by native English speakers and in general (there are exceptions though) support for anything outside of the Latin alphabet as English uses it (no accent marks or diacriticals) is poor to non-existent. Sometimes to get subtitle programs to work correctly with other alphabets or the Latin alphabet plus diacriticals you have to go into Windows and under the Region and Language section say for non-Unicode programs to use a specific code page that your language is in. This can fix the subtitle issue, but it may also impact other programs in a way that you may not like. This kind of change is very dangerous for people to use if they can't actually read the language they change this setting to and it's not recommended by me in such cases. People who make this change to a language they cannot read may find that they can't change it back because they can't read enough to go back and undo the change.

    If your plan is to mostly use these subtitles for playback on media streamers or DVD or BluRay players, you may need to use a specific code page like 1252 rather than Unicode. If you're playing on a PC then Unicode should be OK.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads