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  1. Apple signals end to OS X Snow Leopard support

    Untagged stones will be tagged in somewhere, sometimes in future.

    Apple has apparently decided to kill support for OS X Snow Leopard, the 2009 operating system that has resisted retirement for more than a year.

    Also in play, however, is the fact that Snow Leopard was the last version of OS X able to run applications designed for the PowerPC processor, the Apple/IBM/Motorola-crafted CPU used by Apple before it switched to Intel in 2006. Snow Leopard, while incompatible with PowerPC silicon, is the most recent OS X that Apple lets run the Rosetta translation utility, and thus launch PowerPC software on Intel-based Macs.

    I do have Snow Leopard, but it is quite stable, perfectly tuned with hardware, no more updates are required.
    Last edited by enim; 28th Feb 2014 at 13:08.
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  2. Member orsetto's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2007
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    For long-term users of pricey "pro" legacy devices that depend on Mac, the original 10.5 Leopard (in some cases 10.4 Tiger) era was the real endgame. Snow Leopard began an avalanche of incompatibility/instability problems, culminating in the "nobody asked for it" Lion + Thunderbolt dynamic duo that we're apparently stuck with forever (or until Apple finally builds an "innovative" keyboard cover for the iPad and puts Mac out of its undignified misery). Snow Leopard 10.6 is workable with many older devices and programs, just not as easily as 10.5 Leopard. The Rosetta implementation in Snow Leopard is not quite as stable as Leopard, which was not quite as good as Tiger (the last OSX that would permit full installation of legacy full-featured hardware drivers for scanning, printing and cameras).

    At least the old Mac tower CPUs are unkillable: some of us are gonna need them for a long, long time yet. Windows XP is an option, depending on the legacy device in question, but the software and FireWire doesn't always run as well in XP guise.
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  3. Member
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    Apple is forcing people to upgrade to Mavericks. I don't blame them as Mavericks is actually pretty good and I get how having to support a million different OSes sucks. At this point only really old hardware, which to Apple's eternal credit often still works, can't upgrade.

    One person's "They took that away? I'm screwed!" is another person's "Eh. I never used that anyway." I upgraded to Mavericks and I had exactly ONE program that was really old that would not run under it because I think it used that Rosetta stuff. I found a free replacement for it from another maker and I'm good to go. I'll spare you my opinion of people who are still relying on PowerPC based software, but it's not a positive one.

    I'm puzzled as to why this counts as "Latest Video New", enim. This should have gone in our Mac section.
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  4. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    4 years is a little short to kill it. winXP got 12 years. i read somewhere 20% of apples still run on it.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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    I agree that's a little short for a unix based system ... well, it may not be technically unix, but it is BSD certified and I don't know many people who have reason to care whether it's a unix or linux or mach kernel.

    Actually I suspect a unix/linux based system that's no longer getting security updates is probably still more secure than supported Windoze.
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  6. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    it'll only take one new exploit on this newly unsupported os to cause a lot of pain with the number of users still on it. unfortunately there are mac hackers out there these days.
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    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  7. Apple is forcing people to upgrade to Mavericks.
    it's true.
    I gonna stick with legacy coz I have lots self home brewed program working perfect on Snow Leopard. Plus, compiled on one does not work well on others. Now a days I do not Have enough time that I can start all over again. I luv spending time with members and watching some really good stuff. I do not want to cause a system turbulence.

    Actually I suspect a unix/linux based system that's no longer getting security updates is probably still more secure than supported Windoze.
    it's also true. from xmas 2009 to till now I never had any problem, boot like a charm, runs like a charm.
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  8. unfortunately there are mac hackers out there these days.
    regardless of OS, hackers are every where. Mac has undergone lots of exploits.
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  9. Member orsetto's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jman98 View Post
    One person's "They took that away? I'm screwed!" is another person's "Eh. I never used that anyway."
    True enough, but Mac is an odd duck compared to other systems. For better and worse, Mac drove the print and A/V trade for a very long time before Windows achieved reasonable parity and took over the reigns. A lot of unique, very expensive, durable hardware devices (scanners, MFD backs, specialty printers) were designed around the assumption of relatively-stable core Mac fundamentals, which went out the window awhile back. So those of us still using some "old software" and Mac models aren't doing it for shits-n-giggles: we're using drivers and software thats required to run our aging and often irreplaceable hardware. Those drivers don't work, period, with current OS versions, and there are no proprietary updates available. Quite a few $20K flatbeds, drum scanners and printers are still in service that have no brand new equivalents marketed with software that runs on the umpteen Lion derivatives.

    Not to mention Apple promoted bloody hell out of FireWire, made it the de facto standard for some industries (which still rely on it in their brand new 2014 products), but unilaterally decided to blow it off without so much as a kiss goodbye when Thunderbolt caught its fancy. Thunderbolt>FireWire adapters have glitches for quite a few devices: FireWire isn't even close to obsolete yet in the fields many pros buy MacBook "Pros" for. To cite the most common example, those who invested $35K-$50K in a Phase or Leaf or Hasselblad MFD solution are none too thrilled with Apple's overnight Thunderbolt migration. Since Apple decided "nobody needs expansion slots in MacBooks," the least they could have done was leave in the $1.25 FireWire socket. These aren't $200 Chromebooks, they're $2000 MacBooks.

    Mavericks is nice. The newest MacBooks and Mac Pro "ashcan" are remarkable in some respects. But they're not a drop-in replacement in some environments for the older models, because of the inflexible "new barely-warmed-over Mac model/completely new random OSX version" boot ROM lockstep. If one still needs to run a Fuji, Creo, Leaf Aptus II, or Heidelberg, Mac evolution can be a mixed bag.

    And yeah, agreed, this opinion thread should be in the general Mac forum.
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  10. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    +1 - i feel for ya. a mac is now a weird cousin pc with bizzaro ports running a unix/linux poor incomplete copy of winblows.
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    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  11. Member hiptune's Avatar
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    I've got a Mac G5 with an older version of Final Cut Pro, one that at least works with Prores HQ 422. It's not going anywhere soon or anywhere later. I simply maxed out the memory and continued on like it's still 2008. I do lots of video work on this Mac and often finish up a Mac project on a PC with Sony Vegas. It's fine for now. I also have a Mac laptop with more recent OS if I really needed to run something new from Apple, but I just prefer everything on a PC other than trusty old FCP.
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  12. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    I'm all for looking forward, but I would never totally eschew relying on what's come before. Businesses plunk down a lot of bank on the infrastructure needed to make what we like. They, like consumers, have been hit hard that last few years, so they're not gonna just get fast & loose with the newest thing, even if they could (some stuff never HAS been updated).
    I know a multitude of companies that are trying desperately to hang on to their past investments to give them ROI profitability. Planned premature obsolescence, and dropping of support for legacy stuff, is just BULLSHIT!

    Hey Apple & MS, if you're gonna drop support for EOL stuff, how about releasing the code as FOSS material so SOMEBODY can help out the little guy (even if they might, heaven forbid, make a buck on it)!!???

    New is cool, but junking old stuff when it still might have a lot of good years left, is foolhardy.

    With that said: I just ordered my 4k 3DTV!! (not being hypocrytical - no SD CRTs left working )

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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