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  1. Member Frank-0-Video's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2009
    Location: Alabama - United States
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    Greetings .....

    At present I am using an HP 4850 flatbed scanner w/photo adapter to scan 35mm slides and negatives. Unfortunately, there are some slides that are (because of original exposure conditions) not getting enough illumination to be properly scanned -- in other words, if a particular slide is too dark, the scanner makes no file of it. slide.

    Seeking recommendations regarding either of the following options ---

    (1) A photo-only 35mm scanner of low cost that will provide proper illumination.

    (2) If not a scanner, then a reputable and reasonably priced photo service that can handle the problem slides.

    Thanx-A-Lot, Frank-0-Video
    Last edited by Frank-0-Video; 16th Feb 2014 at 23:32.
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  2. BuskerAlley.com zoobie's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2005
    Location: Colorado Rocky Mountains
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    You may be able to make a little white paper background which may lighten it or just use a photo editor to lighten. Someone used a florescent light to scan which came out pretty good, too.
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  3. Member Frank-0-Video's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2009
    Location: Alabama - United States
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    Greetings ...

    Thank you zoobie but what you suggest won't work.

    An alternative to my own scanner -- or else a reputable service that does this kind of work -- has to have the ability to read the darker slides -AND- make a file of them, something my current scanner isn't able to do. Instead, it just reads those that it can read, and skips those it can't read.

    Thanx-A-Lot, Frank-0-Video
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  4. I take it you're using some kind of batch mode scanning, if you scan the bad slides one by one you should be able to get a file even if it's a black image. Enable the scanner's advanced settings and you will be able to control the brightness/contrast, levels and gamma. Fiddle with them until you get the lightest image you can, then find a setup somewhere in the middle of that and what the scanner automatically selects, take scans of all 3 and import them on separate layers in Photoshop/GIMP. Adjust the layer opacity to blend all the layers until you get something worth keeping. Back in the days I used to shoot Kodachrome, if I'd get a slide that was too dark to see anything I'd just chuck it; like they say, nothing to see here move along.
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  5. Member Frank-0-Video's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2009
    Location: Alabama - United States
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    nic2k4

    Thank you

    Never have used photoshop -- and the one time I sampled GIMP I was -VERY- disappointed with its features as well as its user interface.

    I've never used the HP scanner software as you suggest, and I'm not even certain if those features are there. As soon as the opportunity presents itself, I'll see if I can do as you suggest.

    Thanx-A-Lot, Frank-0-Video
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  6. I mention Photoshop as it is one of the most recognized name in photo editing and GIMP is the FOSS equivalent (for those that prefer the Adobe interface there's Gimpshop). The feature you need is layers with opacity adjustments, this will allow you to increase the dynamic range of the dark images i.e. you'll see more details in the shadow areas without washing out the highlights. There may be other programs out there that have the same capabilities, but I don't know of any.

    I can assure you your HP scanner is capable of doing that.
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