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  1. As a beginner, I wonder if there is a preferred format for creating a blu ray disc to be played on a stand alone player? I will be attending a nephew's wedding in a few months & will be using a Panasonice HD camcorder to record the event. I would then like to create the highest quality blu ray and dvd possible for the family members.
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  2. Banned
    Join Date: Oct 2004
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    frame size, fps, encoding specs, etc., for BluRay & AVCHD: http://www.videohelp.com/hd#tech
    Likely your camera shoots AVCHD.
    Likely you won't get the "highest quality possible" unless you edit/process with smart-rendering editors that can handle HD without re-encoding so many times that your movie looks like VHS. The model of your Panasonic camera wasn't given in your post, so its shooting formats are unknown. You'll find them in the owner's manual.
    The rest depends on what ouput you want. Keep in mind that lossy encoded video such as DVD/BluRay/AVCHD are final delivery formats, not designed as editing formats.
    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:35.
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    For best results, when burning the contents to a blank BluRay discs, use ImgBurn (it's free) and use only single layer BD-R discs. Do NOT use BD-R DL (dual layer), BD-RW or BD-R LTH (Low To High - these discs are cheaper than normal BD-R). If you live in the USA you might look for Verbatim discs.

    For DVD it's best to stick to single layer DVDs. Avoid RW discs. Either DVD-R or DVD+R should be fine unless the recipients have ancient DVD players (8+ years old), in which case DVD-R is probably better. Verbatim (anything EXCEPT their Life series is good) and Taiyo Yuden (you will have to buy online) make the highest quality DVD discs. Using other brands means lower quality and may lead to playback problems on some players.
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  4. Member racer-x's Avatar
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    When quality is a priority, I go with Mpeg-2 @ 25 mb/s (average), it usually is a good encode for 1080p.

    If space is a priority, then I go with x264 @ CRF 19, it usually works well enough.
    Got my retirement plans all set. Looks like I only have to work another 5 years after I die........
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  5. What is your workflow plan?
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    Originally Posted by racer-x View Post
    When quality is a priority, I go with Mpeg-2 @ 25 mb/s (average), it usually is a good encode for 1080p.

    If space is a priority, then I go with x264 @ CRF 19, it usually works well enough.
    Why do you re-encode?
    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:35.
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  7. Practical reasons? For comfort there is some good NLE used and then you just export. Results are mostly not bad at all. CRF 18, 19, or high bitrates ...

    You guys see different results over here, people are posting different videos, but that is mostly posted by somebody that might do whatever wrong along the way, something is not right or something, but in real world of editing you just export and certain bitrate will provide almost unrecognized difference to the original video. It is only one generation encoding.

    There might be NLE that allows no re-encoding like Magix I think, but, you know there might be habits using familiar NLE ...
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    Originally Posted by _Al_ View Post
    Practical reasons? For comfort there is some good NLE used and then you just export. Results are mostly not bad at all. CRF 18, 19, or high bitrates ...
    Not bad at all ? Depend on how blind you are. O.P. stated he wants "highest quality". Think you can get highest quality possible out of re-encodes? Re-encoding loses data. Period.

    Originally Posted by _Al_ View Post
    You guys see different results over here, people are posting different videos, but that is mostly posted by somebody that might do whatever wrong along the way, something is not right or something, but in real world of editing you just export and certain bitrate will provide almost unrecognized difference to the original video. It is only one generation encoding.
    Perhaps you don't recognize it, nor the multiple colorspace conversions the typical NLE inflicts on original video. In the real world, re-encoding loses data. Period.

    Originally Posted by _Al_ View Post
    There might be NLE that allows no re-encoding like Magix I think, but, you know there might be habits using familiar NLE ...
    I don't know many advanced users here who would recommend re-encoding if the O.P. is asking for "highest quality possible". Why don't they recommend it? Because re-encoding loses data. Period.

    On the other hand, most people don't go through the trouble of processing video properly. Difficult to imagine why people would treat their most valued video memories that way, or why others think it doesn't matter. But as this thread demonstrates, that's the way people are sometimes.
    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:36.
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  9. Well. I'd be real, , there is many, many hours shot with camcorder, you have to deal with it quickly and efficiently, have you any idea how editing is time consuming ?

    Premiere does not have to change color space.

    Question, though, do you edit a lot or not at all? Because you cannot edit video in Avisynth or videoeditor that is not up to specs.

    Rule is to shoot video in good quality in the first place, no noise, encoding then does not hurt afterwards at all, I am aware of that, not to try some desperate actions afterwards, time consuming things in post. To shoot good raw material is a preference, not to try to resurrect something afterwards. He shoots wedding, he needs to have lights out if there is not much light out, during dancing for example, I was doing these recordings also, whatever was lit, always had a higher value, etc... So he needs to be adviced to shoot video properly, not to resurrect whatever he's gonna get.
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  10. Member racer-x's Avatar
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    Since this is a wedding photographer, he will likely incorporate special effects such as slo-mo, animated tittles, and of course color grading. Obviously this will require one re-encode and that will be on final export format.
    Got my retirement plans all set. Looks like I only have to work another 5 years after I die........
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  11. And for Blu-ray, one has to re-encode anyway, no camcorder shoots Blu-ray specs.
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    True, but there's always AVCHD which is likely what the camera uses. There are smart-rendering editors for AVCHD. Some can apply special effects without too much damage or heavy re-encoding.
    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:36.
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  13. Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
    True, but there's always AVCHD which is likely what the camera uses. There are smart-rendering editors for AVCHD. Some can apply special effects without too much damage or heavy re-encoding.
    yes, the camera does use the AVCHD format, but please remember that I am a beginner trying to learn the what to do's & when to do its. With that in mind, what will my next step be to record to blu ray/dvd. I have read that AVCHD can be written to a dvd with near blu ray quality........is that correct.
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  14. Originally Posted by racer-x View Post
    Since this is a wedding photographer, he will likely incorporate special effects such as slo-mo, animated tittles, and of course color grading. Obviously this will require one re-encode and that will be on final export format.
    no........I am not a professional photographer. I just bought this cam corder & practice so that I can create a keepsake for all the family members of the wedding. That is why I need step by step guidance
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    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
    True, but there's always AVCHD which is likely what the camera uses. There are smart-rendering editors for AVCHD. Some can apply special effects without too much damage or heavy re-encoding.
    yes, the camera does use the AVCHD format, but please remember that I am a beginner trying to learn the what to do's & when to do its. With that in mind, what will my next step be to record to blu ray/dvd. I have read that AVCHD can be written to a dvd with near blu ray quality........is that correct.
    You can author HD content on DVD5/9 media, but it won't necessarily be "near blu ray quality" (I guess it depends on how "bad" the blu ray you are comparing it to is), because the allowable safe bitrates are much lower (the transfer rates for the media are lower, less than 1/2 of BD)

    Only certain BD players will be compatible with these "AVCHD" discs, they usually have the label plastered on them . No "regular" DVD player will be able to play it
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    All things being erqual, AVCHD and BluRay are the same quality. They are not organized on formally formatted discs in the same way, but given the same bitrate, frame size, etc, they are effectively the same thing. I refer you again to the BD/AVCHD spec page in our forum.

    Your HD camcorder likely records with a choice of frame sizes and frame rates. Choose a speed and frame size that matches any of the standards shown on that spec page. Personally I'd go with 1280x720. It's easier to manage and edit than 1080, and AVCHD will give you a bit more choice in encoding. Likely your camera shoots AVCHD, not "BluRay", but we don't know what camera you're using.

    Lossy encoded camera formats like MPEG or AVCHD are not designed as "editable" formats. They are final delivery formats, encoded to those formats after all editing/cleanup/fancy stuff are processed, and preferably processed as lossless media to avoid ugly compression artifacts and other losses. Most consumer NLE's will convert recklessly to RGB for "editing" and adding features, and those colorspace changes from the original and back again to BT.709 YV12 can look disastrous. So I encourage you to consider details like this before you feed your wedding into a typical consumer product and end up with something that looks like VHS.
    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:36.
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