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  1. As a beginner, I wonder if there is a preferred format for creating a blu ray disc to be played on a stand alone player? I will be attending a nephew's wedding in a few months & will be using a Panasonice HD camcorder to record the event. I would then like to create the highest quality blu ray and dvd possible for the family members.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:35.
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    For best results, when burning the contents to a blank BluRay discs, use ImgBurn (it's free) and use only single layer BD-R discs. Do NOT use BD-R DL (dual layer), BD-RW or BD-R LTH (Low To High - these discs are cheaper than normal BD-R). If you live in the USA you might look for Verbatim discs.

    For DVD it's best to stick to single layer DVDs. Avoid RW discs. Either DVD-R or DVD+R should be fine unless the recipients have ancient DVD players (8+ years old), in which case DVD-R is probably better. Verbatim (anything EXCEPT their Life series is good) and Taiyo Yuden (you will have to buy online) make the highest quality DVD discs. Using other brands means lower quality and may lead to playback problems on some players.
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  4. Member racer-x's Avatar
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    When quality is a priority, I go with Mpeg-2 @ 25 mb/s (average), it usually is a good encode for 1080p.

    If space is a priority, then I go with x264 @ CRF 19, it usually works well enough.
    Never argue with meaningless people over meaningless topics..............
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  5. What is your workflow plan?
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:35.
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  7. Practical reasons? For comfort there is some good NLE used and then you just export. Results are mostly not bad at all. CRF 18, 19, or high bitrates ...

    You guys see different results over here, people are posting different videos, but that is mostly posted by somebody that might do whatever wrong along the way, something is not right or something, but in real world of editing you just export and certain bitrate will provide almost unrecognized difference to the original video. It is only one generation encoding.

    There might be NLE that allows no re-encoding like Magix I think, but, you know there might be habits using familiar NLE ...
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:36.
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  9. Well. I'd be real, , there is many, many hours shot with camcorder, you have to deal with it quickly and efficiently, have you any idea how editing is time consuming ?

    Premiere does not have to change color space.

    Question, though, do you edit a lot or not at all? Because you cannot edit video in Avisynth or videoeditor that is not up to specs.

    Rule is to shoot video in good quality in the first place, no noise, encoding then does not hurt afterwards at all, I am aware of that, not to try some desperate actions afterwards, time consuming things in post. To shoot good raw material is a preference, not to try to resurrect something afterwards. He shoots wedding, he needs to have lights out if there is not much light out, during dancing for example, I was doing these recordings also, whatever was lit, always had a higher value, etc... So he needs to be adviced to shoot video properly, not to resurrect whatever he's gonna get.
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  10. Member racer-x's Avatar
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    Since this is a wedding photographer, he will likely incorporate special effects such as slo-mo, animated tittles, and of course color grading. Obviously this will require one re-encode and that will be on final export format.
    Never argue with meaningless people over meaningless topics..............
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  11. And for Blu-ray, one has to re-encode anyway, no camcorder shoots Blu-ray specs.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:36.
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  13. Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
    True, but there's always AVCHD which is likely what the camera uses. There are smart-rendering editors for AVCHD. Some can apply special effects without too much damage or heavy re-encoding.
    yes, the camera does use the AVCHD format, but please remember that I am a beginner trying to learn the what to do's & when to do its. With that in mind, what will my next step be to record to blu ray/dvd. I have read that AVCHD can be written to a dvd with near blu ray quality........is that correct.
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  14. Originally Posted by racer-x View Post
    Since this is a wedding photographer, he will likely incorporate special effects such as slo-mo, animated tittles, and of course color grading. Obviously this will require one re-encode and that will be on final export format.
    no........I am not a professional photographer. I just bought this cam corder & practice so that I can create a keepsake for all the family members of the wedding. That is why I need step by step guidance
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    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
    True, but there's always AVCHD which is likely what the camera uses. There are smart-rendering editors for AVCHD. Some can apply special effects without too much damage or heavy re-encoding.
    yes, the camera does use the AVCHD format, but please remember that I am a beginner trying to learn the what to do's & when to do its. With that in mind, what will my next step be to record to blu ray/dvd. I have read that AVCHD can be written to a dvd with near blu ray quality........is that correct.
    You can author HD content on DVD5/9 media, but it won't necessarily be "near blu ray quality" (I guess it depends on how "bad" the blu ray you are comparing it to is), because the allowable safe bitrates are much lower (the transfer rates for the media are lower, less than 1/2 of BD)

    Only certain BD players will be compatible with these "AVCHD" discs, they usually have the label plastered on them . No "regular" DVD player will be able to play it
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 05:36.
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