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  1. I have recorded several HD tv programs via OTA to my pc. I would now like to create a blu-ray dvd of these recordings to watch on my hd tv. I have a Samsung external blu ray writer/player. Cyberlink software came with the unit. Now all I need is someone to guide me through the process. Do I need to convert the programing on my pc prior to starting the burning process? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated
    Last edited by Baldrick; 6th Jan 2014 at 16:14.
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
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    Post the details from your hd tv files. Use mediainfo, view->text.


    And I changed the thread title.
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    Most likely your Blu-ray player won't play the native recording files from your tuner+dvr software. For example, I use Windows 7 Media Center, which records 1080p hdtv streams as *.wtv files. These are not playable by my (nor most) blu-ray players. So I use MCBuddy to re-package the files to the *.mkv container. Usually I also re-encode the files with a x.264 codec, which reduces disc space. Most (not all) blu-ray players can read these files (AVC video in an MKV container) and play them back.HTH...
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    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    I have recorded several HD tv programs via OTA to my pc. I would now like to create a blu-ray dvd of these recordings to watch on my hd tv. I have a Samsung external blu ray writer/player. Cyberlink software came with the unit. Now all I need is someone to guide me through the process. Do I need to convert the programing on my pc prior to starting the burning process? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated
    The answer depends on the nature of the recordings, which is why Baldric asked for a MediaInfo report, but it also depends on the Blu-Ray player you have. Many (but not all) recent Blu-Ray players can play some types of media files from a DVD or Blu-Ray disc. If so, you may not need to author a Blu-Ray disc. You may only need to move your recordings into a container that the Blu-Ray player recognizes, and burn a data disc containing the new files using ImgBurn.
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  5. Originally Posted by rowkc View Post
    Most likely your Blu-ray player won't play the native recording files from your tuner+dvr software. For example, I use Windows 7 Media Center, which records 1080p hdtv streams as *.wtv files. These are not playable by my (nor most) blu-ray players. So I use MCBuddy to re-package the files to the *.mkv container. Usually I also re-encode the files with a x.264 codec, which reduces disc space. Most (not all) blu-ray players can read these files (AVC video in an MKV container) and play them back.HTH...
    I also have Windows 7 pc with media center installed.
    Is there a simple way to determine the "native recording files"?
    Is the use of MCBuddy simple enough for a beginner?
    Does this reconfiguring still maintain the dolby surrond audio?

    sorry for the simpleton questions, but just trying to get my feet wet

    thanks again
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    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    I also have Windows 7 pc with media center installed.
    Is there a simple way to determine the "native recording files"?
    There is and Baldrick told you EXACTLY how to do it, but it seems that you are not really interested in listening to what you are being told. Baldrick had the mercy on you to dumb down his response to one simple sentence of instructions and one simple sentence of advice for the future and that was still too much for you. Those who have limitless patience will have to deal with you now.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:50.
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    Originally Posted by jman98 View Post
    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    I also have Windows 7 pc with media center installed.
    Is there a simple way to determine the "native recording files"?
    There is and Baldrick told you EXACTLY how to do it, but it seems that you are not really interested in listening to what you are being told. Baldrick had the mercy on you to dumb down his response to one simple sentence of instructions and one simple sentence of advice for the future and that was still too much for you. Those who have limitless patience will have to deal with you now.
    The OP said his recordings are .wtv files. Baldric's advice is good for most file types, but not .wtv files. MediaInfo provides no useful information about the audio or video when used on a .wtv file.


    A .wtv file has to be converted to something else first before MediaInfo can provide a useful report. MCEBuddy can convert unencrypted .wtv files to .ts format, which MediaInfo can analyze in greater detail.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:51.
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  10. OTA caps are almost certainly MPEG 2 and AC3, and Blu-ray compatible. VideoRedo can remux WTV files to other containers. Windows comes with a program that can remux to DVR-MS. Many editors will work with DVR-MS.
    Last edited by jagabo; 7th Jan 2014 at 15:28.
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    OTA caps are almost certainly MPEG 2 and AC3, and Blu-ray compatible. .
    That depends on location. DTV in N. America is always MPEG 2 and AC3. DTV in other places can be different. The audio may need to be converted in some cases. I think some European countries use H.264 for HD video plus AAC for HD audio or MPEG-2 for SD video plus MPEG-1 layer 2 for SD audio.
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  12. Originally Posted by jman98 View Post
    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    I also have Windows 7 pc with media center installed.
    Is there a simple way to determine the "native recording files"?
    There is and Baldrick told you EXACTLY how to do it, but it seems that you are not really interested in listening to what you are being told. Baldrick had the mercy on you to dumb down his response to one simple sentence of instructions and one simple sentence of advice for the future and that was still too much for you. Those who have limitless patience will have to deal with you now.

    THANK YOU for your holier than thou attitude.......it is greatly appreciated

    As was originally stated.......I am a complete newbie to this process & if I have to depend on jerks like you to learn, then I never will, but I'm sure you came out of the womb knowing it all

    I understood the part about downloading the software, but in some instances, you can right click & get the file extension. That is what I was looking for
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:51.
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  14. Let me explain a little more of what I would like to be able to do

    I have recorded some basketball games via over the air antenna. Since these recordings are in high definition, I would like to convert these recordings to a blu-ray dvd to watch on a large screen tv where I have a Panasonic blu ray dvd player attached. I have an external Samsung blu ray writer connected to my pc via usb. The cyberlink software came with the unit. So I understand that I need to convert the recordings to something other type of file before creating the blu ray. Someone suggested using MCEBuddy to remove the commercials from the recordings. I would like to know which software package will perform this operation for me. Another ?.....if I recorded the halves of the game separately, is there a way to merge them together when creating the blu-ray disc.

    Many thanks to those that would care to share their acquired knowledge with a beginner
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:51.
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  16. Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    in some instances, you can right click & get the file extension. That is what I was looking for
    Open Windows Explorer's "Folder and Search" options. Go to the View tab. Turn off "Hide extensions for know file types". Now you can see all file extension in Explorer.
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    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    I have recorded some basketball games via over the air antenna. Since these recordings are in high definition, I would like to convert these recordings to a blu-ray dvd to watch on a large screen tv where I have a Panasonic blu ray dvd player attached.
    Your Panasonic Blu-Ray player may play some kinds of media files burned as data from BD-R discs discs. Check the manual to see if that is possible. Burning data files to BD-R discs takes less time and effort than creating authored Blu-ray discs with a menu.


    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    So I understand that I need to convert the recordings to something other type of file before creating the blu ray. Someone suggested using MCEBuddy to remove the commercials from the recordings. I would like to know which software package will perform this operation for me. Another ?.....if I recorded the halves of the game separately, is there a way to merge them together when creating the blu-ray disc.?
    Automated commercial removal is frequently innaccurate. I always remove commercials by hand. I recommend using VideoReDo for editing. VideoReDo can also perform automated commercial removal if you really want to do that, as well join video clips together using its Joiner list. VideoReDo's editiors are very good for working with HDTV captures. They both do a better job handling DTV transmission errors than other editing software, and will not re-encode except at cut points, or when correcting transmission errors.
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  18. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    OTA caps are almost certainly MPEG 2 and AC3, and Blu-ray compatible. .
    That depends on location. DTV in N. America is always MPEG 2 and AC3. DTV in other places can be different. The audio may need to be converted in some cases. I think some European countries use H.264 for HD video plus AAC for HD audio or MPEG-2 for SD video plus MPEG-1 layer 2 for SD audio.
    As yet, most HD TV in Europe broadcast in AC3, not AAC. AAC is used by DAB+ (Digital Audio Broadcast Plus), while DAB and SD TV use MP2 and AC3. HD TV video is solely in H.264.
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    AAC is already wide spread, depending on what you are able to receive and to record.
    I already deal with HEVC transmissions.
    *** Now that you have read me, do some other things. ***
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  20. Last night I checked the extension of the recordings & this is what I found
    Windows Recorded TV Show (.wtv)
    rembering that the goal is to create a blu ray version of these recordings that can be viewed on any ones tv that has a blu ray player, do I still need to convert these files.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:51.
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  22. Right click on the file and select Open With -> WTV File Converter. After it's remuxed to DVR-MS use MediaInfo to examine its properties, video and audio codecs.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:52.
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    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    the goal is to create a blu ray version of these recordings that can be viewed on any ones tv that has a blu ray player, do I still need to convert these files.
    You will need to convert your recordings, edit them, and author a Blu-Ray disc. Not all Blu-ray players can play data discs, so burning your recordings to a data disc after converting them from .WTV to something else is no longer an option.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:52.
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  26. Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    Let me explain a little more of what I would like to be able to do

    I have recorded some basketball games via over the air antenna. Since these recordings are in high definition, I would like to convert these recordings to a blu-ray dvd to watch on a large screen tv where I have a Panasonic blu ray dvd player attached. I have an external Samsung blu ray writer connected to my pc via usb. The cyberlink software came with the unit. So I understand that I need to convert the recordings to something other type of file before creating the blu ray. Someone suggested using MCEBuddy to remove the commercials from the recordings. I would like to know which software package will perform this operation for me. Another ?.....if I recorded the halves of the game separately, is there a way to merge them together when creating the blu-ray disc.

    Many thanks to those that would care to share their acquired knowledge with a beginner

    My suggestion... if your final goal is to do only what I have specifically highlighted in the quote above, then consider this: you may not have to burn a blu-ray BD-R to watch those basketball games. You just might be able to simply copy the games to a USB flash drive and play from that.

    Check the specs of your Panasonic Blu-ray player unit. Most likely it has either a USB 2.0 and/or SD card reader input, and can play back HD content from those types of media. If this is the case with your Blu-ray player, then you are not restricted to BD-R as the target media for the content you want to play on that Panasonic unit.

    I record over-the-air HDTV (specifically, terrestrial ATSC in the US), and I can bring the programs and watch them with friends by copying the program (after editing out commercials -- for this I use VideoReDo) onto a USB flash drive or SD card. I plug the USB flash drive into my friend's Blu-ray player (via its front USB 2.0 port) and it can read and display the folders/files stored on the USB flash drive. Use the <L><R>/<U><D> buttons on the Blu-ray player's remote control to navigate to the file you wish to play, then press <SEL> or <ENTER> or <OK>.

    You may want to see if this is an option for you before resigning yourself to learn how to properly author and burn a blu-ray disc. Simply copying the content to a USB flashdrive or SD card and playing from that is much much easier IMHO.
    Last edited by PartingShot; 9th Jan 2014 at 21:26.
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  27. Originally Posted by PartingShot View Post
    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    Let me explain a little more of what I would like to be able to do

    I have recorded some basketball games via over the air antenna. Since these recordings are in high definition, I would like to convert these recordings to a blu-ray dvd to watch on a large screen tv where I have a Panasonic blu ray dvd player attached. I have an external Samsung blu ray writer connected to my pc via usb. The cyberlink software came with the unit. So I understand that I need to convert the recordings to something other type of file before creating the blu ray. Someone suggested using MCEBuddy to remove the commercials from the recordings. I would like to know which software package will perform this operation for me. Another ?.....if I recorded the halves of the game separately, is there a way to merge them together when creating the blu-ray disc.

    Many thanks to those that would care to share their acquired knowledge with a beginner

    My suggestion... if your final goal is to do only what I have specifically highlighted in the quote above, then consider this: you may not have to burn a blu-ray BD-R to watch those basketball games. You just might be able to simply copy the games to a USB flash drive and play from that.

    Check the specs of your Panasonic Blu-ray player unit. Most likely it has either a USB 2.0 and/or SD card reader input, and can play back HD content from those types of media. If this is the case with your Blu-ray player, then you are not restricted to BD-R as the target media for the content you want to play on that Panasonic unit.

    I record over-the-air HDTV (specifically, terrestrial ATSC in the US), and I can bring the programs and watch them with friends by copying the program (after editing out commercials -- for this I use VideoReDo) onto a USB flash drive or SD card. I plug the USB flash drive into my friend's Blu-ray player (via its front USB 2.0 port) and it can read and display the folders/files stored on the USB flash drive. Use the <L><R>/<U><D> buttons on the Blu-ray player's remote control to navigate to the file you wish to play, then press <SEL> or <ENTER> or <OK>.

    You may want to see if this is an option for you before resigning yourself to learn how to properly author and burn a blu-ray disc. Simply copying the content to a USB flashdrive or SD card and playing from that is much much easier IMHO.
    this would seem simpler, but if you are just copying the file in the same format why would it work on a flash drive & not other media.
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  28. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Right click on the file and select Open With -> WTV File Converter. After it's remuxed to DVR-MS use MediaInfo to examine its properties, video and audio codecs.
    Will I have to download & install WTV File Converter or is it installed as part of Windows 7?

    I did a search and this is already available for use.
    Last edited by bnewt; 10th Jan 2014 at 11:46.
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  29. Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Right click on the file and select Open With -> WTV File Converter. After it's remuxed to DVR-MS use MediaInfo to examine its properties, video and audio codecs.
    Will I have to download & install WTV File Converter or is it installed as part of Windows 7?
    Why don't you try it and find out? Just how long does it take you to right click on a file?
    Last edited by jagabo; 10th Jan 2014 at 10:34.
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    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    Originally Posted by PartingShot View Post
    Originally Posted by bnewt View Post
    Let me explain a little more of what I would like to be able to do

    I have recorded some basketball games via over the air antenna. Since these recordings are in high definition, I would like to convert these recordings to a blu-ray dvd to watch on a large screen tv where I have a Panasonic blu ray dvd player attached. I have an external Samsung blu ray writer connected to my pc via usb. The cyberlink software came with the unit. So I understand that I need to convert the recordings to something other type of file before creating the blu ray. Someone suggested using MCEBuddy to remove the commercials from the recordings. I would like to know which software package will perform this operation for me. Another ?.....if I recorded the halves of the game separately, is there a way to merge them together when creating the blu-ray disc.

    Many thanks to those that would care to share their acquired knowledge with a beginner

    My suggestion... if your final goal is to do only what I have specifically highlighted in the quote above, then consider this: you may not have to burn a blu-ray BD-R to watch those basketball games. You just might be able to simply copy the games to a USB flash drive and play from that.

    Check the specs of your Panasonic Blu-ray player unit. Most likely it has either a USB 2.0 and/or SD card reader input, and can play back HD content from those types of media. If this is the case with your Blu-ray player, then you are not restricted to BD-R as the target media for the content you want to play on that Panasonic unit.

    I record over-the-air HDTV (specifically, terrestrial ATSC in the US), and I can bring the programs and watch them with friends by copying the program (after editing out commercials -- for this I use VideoReDo) onto a USB flash drive or SD card. I plug the USB flash drive into my friend's Blu-ray player (via its front USB 2.0 port) and it can read and display the folders/files stored on the USB flash drive. Use the <L><R>/<U><D> buttons on the Blu-ray player's remote control to navigate to the file you wish to play, then press <SEL> or <ENTER> or <OK>.

    You may want to see if this is an option for you before resigning yourself to learn how to properly author and burn a blu-ray disc. Simply copying the content to a USB flashdrive or SD card and playing from that is much much easier IMHO.
    this would seem simpler, but if you are just copying the file in the same format why would it work on a flash drive & not other media.
    It probably does work on other media, but you have to check the manual to find out what playback options are supported. ...or post the model number for your Panasonic Blu-Ray player so someone else can attempt to download the manual and check it for you.
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