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  1. Okay, so I rip my own Blu-rays to have a digital copy in case the disc scratches or something ever happens. I ripped all 13 movies of Pokémon with MAKEMKV, and kept them in my 1 TB HDD.. thing is I'm running off space. (Don't ask.) And I want to resize all of the 13 movies to a more adequate file size, but I don't want to lose quality. First option is Handbrake wich does a kind of alright job, but it recodes the file and probably touches something.

    Probably can I lower the mbps so the size file will be less? All the movies take up to 250 GB...


    I also have MPEG-2 rips of my own Digimon Tamers DVDs. They all take 70 GB together. Can you tell me how to resize them keeping the quality? Handbrake does it but I still feel it changes something, I dunno, probably resizing down the mbps too?


    Here's the mediainfo of the blu-rips.


    General
    Unique ID : 331341321027730597019100768906295509016 (0xF946046716C795A6640AF354B9B20018)
    Complete name : F:\Pokémon\Películas de Pokémon\Película 8\Pokémon_Lucario_and_the_Mystery_of_Mew_t00.mkv
    Format : Matroska
    Format version : Version 2
    File size : 18.1 GiB
    Duration : 1h 41mn
    Overall bit rate mode : Variable
    Overall bit rate : 25.6 Mbps
    Movie name : Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew
    Encoded date : UTC 2013-10-19 08:43:43
    Writing application : MakeMKV v1.8.5 win(x64-release)
    Writing library : libmakemkv v1.8.5 (1.2.0/1.1.0) win(x64-release)


    Video
    ID : 1
    Format : AVC
    Format/Info : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile : High@L4.1
    Format settings, CABAC : Yes
    Format settings, ReFrames : 2 frames
    Codec ID : V_MPEG4/ISO/AVC
    Duration : 1h 41mn
    Bit rate mode : Variable
    Bit rate : 24.5 Mbps
    Width : 1 920 pixels
    Height : 1 080 pixels
    Display aspect ratio : 16:9
    Frame rate mode : Constant
    Frame rate : 23.976 fps
    Color space : YUV
    Chroma subsampling : 4:2:0
    Bit depth : 8 bits
    Scan type : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame) : 0.492
    Stream size : 17.3 GiB (96%)
    Language : English
    Default : No
    Forced : No


    Audio
    ID : 2
    Format : AC-3
    Format/Info : Audio Coding 3
    Mode extension : CM (complete main)
    Format settings, Endianness : Big
    Codec ID : A_AC3
    Duration : 1h 41mn
    Bit rate mode : Constant
    Bit rate : 640 Kbps
    Channel(s) : 6 channels
    Channel positions : Front: L C R, Side: L R, LFE
    Sampling rate : 48.0 KHz
    Bit depth : 16 bits
    Compression mode : Lossy
    Stream size : 463 MiB (2%)
    Title : 3/2+1
    Language : Japanese
    Default : Yes
    Forced : No


    Menu
    00:00:00.000 : en:Chapter 01
    00:04:57.505 : en:Chapter 02
    00:10:15.948 : en:Chapter 03
    00:14:31.620 : en:Chapter 04
    00:18:13.008 : en:Chapter 05
    00:22:09.328 : en:Chapter 06
    00:25:28.276 : en:Chapter 07
    00:29:22.343 : en:Chapter 08
    00:34:59.097 : en:Chapter 09
    00:39:50.388 : en:Chapter 10
    00:43:28.981 : en:Chapter 11
    00:45:56.712 : en:Chapter 12
    00:50:18.849 : en:Chapter 13
    00:53:45.222 : en:Chapter 14
    00:55:53.433 : en:Chapter 15
    00:59:31.818 : en:Chapter 16
    01:03:23.883 : en:Chapter 17
    01:08:52.503 : en:Chapter 18
    01:14:42.394 : en:Chapter 19
    01:17:28.894 : en:Chapter 20
    01:21:53.742 : en:Chapter 21
    01:26:38.151 : en:Chapter 22
    01:30:54.532 : en:Chapter 23
    01:35:31.225 : en:Chapter 24
    01:39:49.984 : en:Chapter 25
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  2. You cannot make your files smaller without degrading the quality. Handbrake works about as well as any program at reencoding with lower bitrates.
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  3. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    You cannot make your files smaller without degrading the quality. Handbrake works about as well as any program at reencoding with lower bitrates.
    Well, I made a comparison with the original rip and Handbrake resize.. and both images were the same exactly
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2003
    Location: West Texas
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    The same what exactly? The same bitrate, the same file size, the same visual quality?

    You might want to try the animation preset in the x264 tune options within the Video tab.

    If you want to hit a specific file size, you could also try VidCoder instead of Handbrake. It is basically a different interface for the same program, but does offer some extra options. But going smaller you will lose some video quality as already noted.
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  5. Originally Posted by PonyoBellanote View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    You cannot make your files smaller without degrading the quality. Handbrake works about as well as any program at reencoding with lower bitrates.
    Well, I made a comparison with the original rip and Handbrake resize.. and both images were the same exactly
    They may have been close enough for you -- but they were not exactly the same quality. In any case, you now have a solution that works for you.
    Last edited by jagabo; 4th Jan 2014 at 11:46.
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  6. Originally Posted by Kerry56 View Post
    The same what exactly? The same bitrate, the same file size, the same visual quality?

    You might want to try the animation preset in the x264 tune options within the Video tab.

    If you want to hit a specific file size, you could also try VidCoder instead of Handbrake. It is basically a different interface for the same program, but does offer some extra options. But going smaller you will lose some video quality as already noted.
    I want to keep the same visual quality, and lower the bitrate, thinking that makes the file heavy and will resize it without losing much quality.
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  7. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
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    Of course if you lower the bitrate the filesize is smaller. That is how it works filesize = length*bitrate.

    But no one can advise how low to go. Only you can judge visual quality.
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  8. Originally Posted by PonyoBellanote View Post
    resize it without losing much quality.
    And there's the issue: how much quality are you willing to lose. That's a question only you can answer. I usually reencode DVDs with x264 at CRF=18 (for storage on my NAS). That usually gives a bitrate between 1000 and 2000 kbps, depending on the particular video. If you know what to look for and look very closely you'll see some degradation of the picture. But it's fine for every day watching.
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  9. Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    Of course if you lower the bitrate the filesize is smaller. That is how it works filesize = length*bitrate.

    But no one can advise how low to go. Only you can judge visual quality.
    So how do I lower vibrate without touching quality?
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  10. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by PonyoBellanote View Post
    resize it without losing much quality.
    And there's the issue: how much quality are you willing to lose. That's a question only you can answer. I usually reencode DVDs with x264 at CRF=18 (for storage on my NAS). That usually gives a bitrate between 1000 and 2000 kbps, depending on the particular video. If you know what to look for and look very closely you'll see some degradation of the picture. But it's fine for every day watching.
    What if I choose 20?
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  11. Overall, I don't mind losing A BIT of quality, I already have assumed that re-encoding takes a bit of quality.
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  12. Originally Posted by PonyoBellanote View Post
    So how do I lower vibrate without touching quality?
    Nobody can answer that. The number varies with every video.

    Originally Posted by PonyoBellanote View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    I usually reencode DVDs with x264 at CRF=18
    What if I choose 20?
    Then you'll get smaller files with less quality. Low CRF values give better quality and larger files. High CRF values give lower quality and smaller files. You need to encode some video at different CRF values to determine what CRF gives you the quality you want. Then you can encode all your videos at that CRF. One of first places you'll notice problems is in dark grainy areas -- you'll start seeing posterization artifacts there.

    In short:

    Bitrate based encoding lets you specify the size of the resulting video but you don't know what the quality will be.

    CRF based encoding lets you specify the quality but you don't know what the size will be.
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