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  1. Member brassplyer's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: United States
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    I'm treating a segment of video for a friend and going to give it back to them in 3 formats - DVD, Blu-Ray and VHS.

    I've only viewed DVD and Blu-Ray on HDTV, I've never had a VCR hooked up to an HDTV. As I understand it, CRT tv's do their own cropping. In VHS playback mode going to an HDTV does the player do overscan to crop out the switching noise at the bottom or will the switching noise be visible on the HDTV?

    How I plan to dub to VHS is by going through a Digital8 Camcorder to a VCR. Ultimately I want to create a VHS tape that's going to provide optimum playback whether played on a CRT 4:3 tv or an HDTV.

    Suggestions?

    Thanks.
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  2. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
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    Is there such a thing as an up-converting VHS player ?

    Up-converting usually only works over hdmi from a player to a HDTV. You will not find hdmi on a vcr.

    Players do not provide for over-scan. That is done by the tv. If you connect a vcr to a HDTV, the tv should provide the over-scan but there could be a setting on it to turn it off.
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  3. Member brassplyer's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    Is there such a thing as an up-converting VHS player ?

    Up-converting usually only works over hdmi from a player to a HDTV. You will not find hdmi on a vcr.

    Players do not provide for over-scan. That is done by the tv. If you connect a vcr to a HDTV, the tv should provide the over-scan but there could be a setting on it to turn it off.
    I've seen these upconverting combo players that I believe do both disc and VHS playback to an HDTV, I could be mistaken.
    Last edited by brassplyer; 28th Dec 2013 at 12:45.
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  4. Overscan is a property of the TV, not the video source. An upscaling player will probably digitize a 704x480 or 720x480 frame (the same as any video capture device) and upscale that to the output resolution.
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  5. Member DB83's Avatar
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    I think they only up-convert the dvd signal. Just like my own combi only sends a s-video signal from dvd and not from the VHS.
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  6. no, it does not include the overscan. the only thing you will get is the head-switching noise seen at the bottom. i just tested my toshiba dr430 1080p upconverter. it is user selectable to 480p, 720p, and 1080i. but i only tested the 720p, and the hs noise is seen.

    i also recently picked up an external video converter, by Panlong, model Lenkeng Lkv363A, its a hardware upconverter, but not tried it yet. thats next on my todo list of hobbies.

    VHELP's - Sample Clips [last: 12.29.06],
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  7. My TV's option to disable overscanning is called "screen fit". It can be enabled/disabled independently for each input. I think overscanning is usually enabled by default. For my TV, disabling overscanning only works for input resolutions of 720p or greater. I suspect that's a fairly standard thing, so unless you are using a VHS player which upscales (I've never met one myself), chances are the TV will overscan and there's nothing you can do about it. Even in 4:3 mode, where the TV displays the 4:3 image by adding black borders to each side of the screen, it still overscans.
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  8. so i tested the Lenkeng Lkv363A unit, its a much better quality upsampler but their seems to be a color levels problem. the blacks seem fine but there is burnout (clipping) in the brights. also, the unit does crop out everything, including vhs head-switching noise.

    VHELP's - Sample Clips [last: 12.29.06],
    my YouTube videos
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