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  1. I have here a DVD recorded in -VR format. (The DVD is a -RW if that's relevant.) This is apparently a standard format but nothing that I have seems to recognize it. (Not only can nothing convert it, nothing can play it either!) Any suggestions? Thanks!
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  2. Member orsetto's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2007
    Location: NYC
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    Most -VR discs were burned on standalone DVD recorders, each of which has its own proprietary implementation of -VR. These discs will usually only play in the same brand/model series of recorder.

    Using a PC, there are some software hacks that occasionally work. The most common recommendation is to use ISObuster, but people neglect to mention that software won't do a friggin thing for you until you pay the license fee, and even then it isn't the most intuitive program in the world to use. Some have had success "finalizing" this type of disc using the Nero suite, but I would not try this with a DVD-RW disc (these may use an incompatible scheme depending on the recorder that burned them).

    My personal quick-n-dirty solution is to use CyberLink PowerDVD player. I have found this software player will locate and play the video files on almost any variation of unfinalized or goofy VR dvd. It was often bundled with new PCs, but if you don't already have it the purchase cost is ridiculous. Instead, download the free trial version and use that: play the DVD analog out from your PC into an external DVD recorder or another PC capture system. Then dispose of the CyberLink trial software: it is bloaty and not needed on your PC after the trial period expires.
    Last edited by orsetto; 28th Dec 2013 at 12:13.
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  3. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Some older versions of Nero would allow you to read the disk and transfer the video content to your HDD in a standard mpeg format.

    VideoRedo will do likewise.

    A 'quick-fix' that sometimes works is to copy the .vro file from the disk to your HDD and rename it as XXXXXXXX.mpg. That will not give you a standard mpg but may allow you to import it in to other programs.
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  4. Member
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    If ISOBuster and other conversion methods fail, the -VR mode discs may be CPRM encrypted. (CPRM encryption is used when recording channels that have copy-once protection onto DVD-RW or DVD-RAM media.) This situation is apparently very common for DVD-RW discs recorded in Japan, but less common elsewhere as it can be difficult to find the required CPRM-compliant DVD-RW media in other countries. relcprm.exe is used to break the encryption. See http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/326725-How-to-decrypt-and-copy-CPRM-VRO-files
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  5. Thanks for your replies. First, the dvd is not Japanese and was dubbed from an old noncommercial tape. I doubt that it's encrypted in any way.

    Giving VR_MOVIE.VRO an mpg extension does nothing, and the results are exactly the same with any software that's attempted to process it: the first 35 seconds or so can be read but then nothing. Software either gives up or hangs after that point.

    Is it possible that there is something in the VR_MANGR.IFO file that indicates at what point in the VRO file the video continues? BTW, the video is a straight dub, no editing of the source.
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    Last edited by sanlyn; 19th Mar 2014 at 09:52.
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  7. Member
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    Originally Posted by vcats View Post
    Thanks for your replies. First, the dvd is not Japanese and was dubbed from an old noncommercial tape. I doubt that it's encrypted in any way.

    Giving VR_MOVIE.VRO an mpg extension does nothing, and the results are exactly the same with any software that's attempted to process it: the first 35 seconds or so can be read but then nothing. Software either gives up or hangs after that point.

    Is it possible that there is something in the VR_MANGR.IFO file that indicates at what point in the VRO file the video continues? BTW, the video is a straight dub, no editing of the source.
    I think it is more likely that this was not a good burn to begin with, or if the disc was made more than a few months ago, the data has started to loose integrity. DVD-RW is not for long-term storage. DVD-RW discs will sometimes be readable for a few years, but they can become unreadable much sooner.
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