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  1. Member
    Join Date: May 2003
    Location: Peterborough, England
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    Apologies in advance but I know absolutely nothing about Macs. I shot video of a meeting for a friends company and produced a DVD of it which they want to send out to the shareholders instead of minutes of the meeting. The DVD is standard PAL (720x576) SD and has been authored as a playable DVD. They now wish to make copies of it to distribute but have just called me to say they don't know how. Apparently when they put the DVD in a computer it opens iTunes and starts to play but is there anything on a Mac that will allow them to do a straight disc copy?
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2000
    Location: Sweden
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    DVDfab?

    edit: Or I don't think the dvd has any copy protection so ignore everything I wrote. I haven't had any mac with a dvd writer so I don't know what they use to make standard dvd backups.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: May 2003
    Location: Peterborough, England
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    No, home produced DVD so no copy protection, no region code (or region code 0).
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
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    Macs are awful systems to try to copy DVDs on. You have my sympathies. Here's a guide. You will need to do the first and third methods here.
    http://www.wikihow.com/Copy-Your-DVDs-With-Mac-OS-X

    Note that if the source DVD is dual layer then all bets are off. I have an older iMac and although it can play commercial dual layer DVDs fine and it can play dual layer DVDs (Verbatim DVD+R DL) that I burn on a different computer running Windows without problems, it has NEVER been able to correctly burn a dual layer DVD. My iMac is about 5 years old so maybe the burner drives are better now, but I mention this as a warning. If your source DVD is single layer then you should be fine, although the method in my link is a bit more painful than doing this under Windows.
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  5. Member
    Join Date: May 2003
    Location: Peterborough, England
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    Fortunately it isn't me that's going to be doing it. They want 180 copies of the DVD and asked me if I would be prepared to do it for them. My usual method, on a PC, is to create an iso image and burn with Imgburn but I won't do more than about 20 at a time as it gets far too boring sitting there feeding the burner. There was no way I was going to do 180! So I supplied one disc and they decided that they could get the office junior to feed the machine instead.

    I'll print off your link and take it to them. Check that it works and leave them to it......
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
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    It's good that someone else will have to make the 180 copies because I can promise you that with that many consumer burned discs, some of the recipients won't be able to play them because they either have 10 year old DVD players that don't like the discs, are idiots, or the office junior will simply botch a few and not realize it. You definitely don't want to receive the crap that will come from the angry people who can't play the discs.
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  7. Member
    Join Date: May 2003
    Location: Peterborough, England
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    That's right. I make a point of using nothing but Taiyo Yuden DVD-R discs and have only ever had about 3 that wouldn't play on a standalone (all Philips incidentally) so I provided them with a DVD+R and no problem. I suspect here that they will be using whatever they can lay their hands on for the cheapest price so who knows what sort of crap they will get.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: May 2012
    Location: texas
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    If this is going to be a regular thing, they might be better off getting a cheap copy tower. I've got a 7 disc duplicator that i got used for 250. the time saved is worth every penny. nothing more complicated than loading the master and the blanks then hitting copy
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  9. Member
    Join Date: May 2003
    Location: Peterborough, England
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    This is probably something that will happen once a year so I'm not sure a copy tower would be worthwhile. Following the guide that jman linked to, they are now feeding blank discs into a machine and are setting up a second one next to it so two can be done at once. They've got TDK DVD+R discs, no idea what they are like but should be reasonable, and I persuaded them against putting labels on them, as we all know that a perfectly good burn can be ruined by a bit of sticky paper.......
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  10. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
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    TDK's discs are pure crap unless maybe they were bought in Japan. TDK sometimes used Taiyo Yuden to make their discs, but only for Japan. They may not do that any more. If they got bought in the UK they're crap. Expect a decent amount of problems like coasters, bad burns, etc. Many many years ago TDK used top manufacturers everywhere for their discs, but they were one of the very first companies to abandon the best manufacturers for the cheap and crappy ones with the exception of the Japanese market where they did continue to use TY for a while (they may or may not still use them there - I have no idea).

    Note that people with VERY old DVD players may also have problems with DVD+R in general.
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  11. Member crjackson's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2002
    Location: Charlotte, NC
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    Just my 2 but I do this all the time on my Mac Pro. It's not much different than on a Windows PC, and I've never had a bad burn using toast and Verbatim DL media.
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