VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 14 of 14
Thread
  1. I had a hard drive crash and found out that I didn't have these video files backed up like I thought. The video files were created using dvdshrink. I then used 7-data recovery which recovered the files but they wont open in dvdshrink or play with my media player. The files have data but only show audio and video _TS files rather than Title 1 in dvdshrink.

    Can I get these files to play again?
    Quote Quote  
  2. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: AZ, USA
    Search Comp PM
    Try playing with VLC player. It works well with damaged files. Check the VIDEO_TS file for the correct size and open it to see if it contains VOBs, IFOs, and BUP files. The VIDEO_TS is the only one with data. If it's the correct size, there may be something there.

    You can use MediaInfo on the files and see what it says about the VOBs.

    If all this fails, you may just have an empty file with the headers telling you the size. You could try a hex editor like the one in VirtualDub Mod.
    If the body of the file is all zeros, there's no data.
    Quote Quote  
  3. unable to reply?
    Quote Quote  
  4. I used MediaInfo to look at one vob file and it says it's 54.6 MiB. That sounds to me like the file is not empty. And the drive crashed and I don't think the files were overwritten.

    I tried using VLC before and the program seems to hang and the screen actually seems to vibrate.

    Can anyone help this newbie figure what comes next?
    Quote Quote  
  5. To what format did u back them up? N what does it say when u play them? Any reports? I am facing a similar problem, so im asking.
    Quote Quote  
  6. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    a vob is usually around 1GB if it's from a movie and not the last vob of a set. 55mb doesn't sound like a complete file from a dvd.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  7. I had lots of crashed HDDs, but never came across any software that can recover 100% files. The only success I have got by changing top electronics card from exact and similar HDD with a person with great precision and high soldering skills. Only the risk involved in this is having both HDD bad if something goes wrong with electronics card like static electricity damages.
    Last edited by enim; 29th Aug 2013 at 13:54.
    Quote Quote  
  8. To aedipuss: The vob is from a file I made of small home movies. The whole _TS file is like 8gb.

    To zenekbezdesek: I don't know what you mean by format. NTSF?


    To enim: How can I be sure that swapping the card is worth a try? Are there symptoms that point to a bad card?
    Quote Quote  
  9. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    you can upload the vob here if you want people to check it. the attachment max file size is now 500mb. (holy crap - when did it get that high?)
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  10. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
    Search Comp PM
    No. As aedipuss states, 55 meg does not sound like a video file unless it is the last vob on the original folder. More likely to be the menu vob.

    Read on the left 'What is DVD' which will tell you what you should be seeing.

    But I would also try other recovery software - Zero Assumption Recovery or Get Data Back to name just two.

    In a word, you did not recover the files since if you had then they would play.
    Quote Quote  
  11. Having someone else fix this doesn't help. I have a large number of files.

    Assuming there is data in the files, what can I do to make them playable?
    Quote Quote  
  12. Member gadgetguy's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2002
    Location: West Mitten, USA
    Search Comp PM
    I have not yet found a recovery software that is successful on video files. After talking with at least two different developers (it's been over a year so I can't remember which ones), they said that the large file size of video files causes them to be addressed differently from the directory. The way theey explained it, the recovery software finds and reads the lost directory which indicates that those files can be recovered, however while the directory properly points to the correct location for smaller files, it only points to mapping information for where the large files are stored. Unfortunately, the recovered directory doesn't know what's a small and what's a larger file so instead of reading the mapping info to recover the video, it recovers the mapping info as a file. There is no video data in that file so there's nothing to play.
    Disclaimer: I don't know how accurate this is because it's my memory of someone else's explanation, but that's as well as I can remember it.
    "Shut up Wesley!" -- Captain Jean-Luc Picard
    Buy My Books
    Quote Quote  
  13. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    Nothing yov,ve said gives any evidence they are even video files anymore. Trash them.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  14. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
    Search Comp PM
    Well I have recovered files of >> 1 gig from un-accessable HDDs and I doubt if storage was contigious. Maybe since the OPs drive crashed here is a different scenario.

    I'll repeat what I said earlier. You must try other software.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads