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  1. Hi

    I have 37 Blu-ray Movies and animation.

    I boutgh a 22 inch monitor @ 1920x1080 native resolution. LG IPS226

    My hard disk has not enough free space.

    I am beginner in video conversion and ripping.

    I want to rip my Blu-ray Movies to mkv format (x264 and AAC) with VidCoder because it is really simple.

    I want to write my mkv files on a DVD.5 (4.37 GB) Because I have more than 100 DVD.5 blank in home.

    My Question is where resolution is suitable for a 4.37 GB mkv file size. 1080p or 720p?

    1080p is native Blu-ray resolution but 720p is down sampling from original resulation.


    this is my setting for Blu-ray rip:
    ============================
    video Format : H.264 (x264)

    Avg Bit rate : almost 5000 Kbps (2-pass encoding)
    ============================
    Audio Format : AAC (Dolby Pro logic II)

    Bit rate : 160 Kbps
    =============================

    which resolution is suitable for my setting and file size (4.37 GB). 1080p or 720p?

    sorry for my english.
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2000
    Location: Sweden
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    I would use 720p for movies over 2 hours and 1080p for shorter movies.

    Or make a 720p and 1080p and compare yourself. It's you that are going to watch the movies....I guess...
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  3. Lone soldier Cauptain's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2006
    Location: Brazil
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    4k or 5k bitrate (2 hours movie), use 1080p.

    But if movie/anime is largest (3hours or more), try 720pp.



    Claudio
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2004
    Location: Canada
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    zelda65: Do you want these files to play like a regular DVD with a menu? Do you just want the best quality h.264 individual file that you can fit on a 4.7 GB disc? Which of these two do you want to accomplish?
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  5. Member
    Join Date: Mar 2011
    Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
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    Your 22" monitor may have 1080p native resolution but if you're going to sit 5 feet or more away from it you won't be able to tell the difference between 1080p and 720p video unless you have much better than 20:20 vision.
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  6. Thanks to all

    =======================
    Originally Posted by Tom Saurus View Post
    zelda65: Do you want these files to play like a regular DVD with a menu? Do you just want the best quality h.264 individual file that you can fit on a 4.7 GB disc? Which of these two do you want to accomplish?
    I want the best quality h.264 individual file that I can fit on a 4.7 GB disc
    =======================

    Originally Posted by Hoser Rob View Post
    Your 22" monitor may have 1080p native resolution but if you're going to sit 5 feet or more away from it you won't be able to tell the difference between 1080p and 720p video unless you have much better than 20:20 vision.
    I am going to sit 2 feet from 22" monitor.
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  7. In my opinion the majority of Bluray discs don't contain 1080p worth of detail. Maybe 1080p worth of noise, but not "detail" as such. However rather than take my word, or anyone else's word for it, it really comes down to what you can see yourself. Maybe pick a movie you consider to have a high amount of fine detail and re-encode a section of it at both 1080p and 720p to see how much difference you can see. To make it fair, use the same encoder settings each time and use single pass, CRF encoding, rather than 2 pass encoding.

    As many Bluray discs tend to be fairly noisy, you might consider running some sort of noise filter when encoding. I'd not been big on noise filtering until I started encoding Bluray discs, but these days I often run a noise filter before resizing to 720p. As noisy video is harder to compress using a noise filter can help keep the file size down while maintaining quality. I don't use Vidcoder so I don't know what sort of noise filtering it offers.

    Personally I always use CRF encoding because you can pick a quality you're happy with and every encode will be of a fairly consistent quality relative to the source. I generally use x264's default settings and a CRF value of 18 and most/many 720p movie encodes will still come in under DVD5 size. I generally don't keep DTS audio though as that tends to be over 1GB on it's own. I either keep the original AC3 audio or convert the DTS audio to AAC.

    Another option to consider is splitting the encode over more than one DVD, should the CRF value and resolution you use result in a file size larger than DVD5. If your output is MKV you can split the MKV file using MKVMergeGUI to burn it onto two discs. The split MKV can easily be rejoined at a later data.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Mar 2011
    Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
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    You can make pretty damn good 1080p downsized to 720p video in about 1.8 to 2Gb h.264 files.
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