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  1. If I rip a DVD movie to an MPEG file, the resultant frame rate is usually 29.97 fps. Yet I'm told if the original source of the video was "film" as opposed to TV, it was most likely shot at 23.98 fps.

    I know how to get MPEG files into VirtualDub using a third-party filter, and how to encode to XviD, but how can I encode 29.97 fps film video to XviD at the original 23.98 fps? (And do I even want to?)

    Thanks.
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  2. VirtualDub's MPEG source filter always performs the flagged 3:2 pulldown with DVD VOB/MPG files to create 29.97 fps interlaced video. And of course, hard telecined NTSC DVDs will always be 29.97 fps. You can use the IVTC filter to restore the 23.976 fps progressive frames of film sources. And yes, you do want to do that. Many players don't deal properly with interlaced Xvid AVI. And 23.976 fps progressive gives better quality at the same bitrate.
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  3. Will I then also have to process the audio if I restore the frame rate to 23.976 fps?
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  4. Originally Posted by wallywalters View Post
    Will I then also have to process the audio if I restore the frame rate to 23.976 fps?
    No. The length, whether at 23.976fps or 29.97fps, is exactly the same.
    Originally Posted by wallywalters View Post
    If I rip a DVD movie to an MPEG file, the resultant frame rate is usually 29.97 fps. Yet I'm told if the original source of the video was "film" as opposed to TV, it was most likely shot at 23.98 fps.
    Many, if not most, TV shows are shot on film these days. Instead of 'TV', the word you want is 'video'.
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  5. Originally Posted by wallywalters View Post
    Will I then also have to process the audio if I restore the frame rate to 23.976 fps?
    The 23.976 fps source is made into 29.97 fps by repeating fields (just think of it as repeating frames). IVTC throws away those repeated fields. So you end up with 20 percent fewer frames at a 20 percent lower frame rate, exactly the same running time.
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