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  1. I have an avi made from another source which has low audio volume. The source, when reviewed has the same levels problem.

    Is there any way to manually adjust the volume from the AVI components?

    If the source is an original disk, what are the steps needed to redo the audio
    with the video?

    I only have any experience using DVDfab and AGK and have not done anything complex with AVI.

    Out curiosity would MKV make the audio editing (volume equalization) any simpler?
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  2. Member
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    The best way is to demux the audio and look at it in an audio editor.

    Sometimes normalizing the file so that the peaks are at -0db will help, other times not.
    The audio editor (such as Audacity) can be used to reduce the dynamic range if necessary,
    then the file can be normalized giving an overall volume increase.

    In either case, looking at the graph in the editor will show you the problem.
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  3. If it's MP3, MP3Gain can be used to boost the volume. You'll have to demux it first, though. And since you didn't bother to tell us what kind of audio it is, all we can do is guess.
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  4. Ok, if you will be patient and not use shortcuts and jargon I may be able to do this.

    First off, the AVI made was done in DVDFab. I would like to do the repair by working on the copy only.

    Alternative is, since I have the original media, I can load that and maybe get the audio onto the hard drive then "demux" normalize, "mux" and replace the faulty audio file in AVI.

    I have a headache. Surely this has come up before and there is no need to reinvent the wheel?

    I'm going to check the original media to see if I can get audio located....


    With the original media in the dvd drive I ran DVDDecrypter. DVDDC made several huge files
    and some smaller ones producing a folder of 6+ gigabites.

    When using DVDFab the whole file with audio and video is just a shade under 1 GB which I prefer and to conserve disk space.

    What would be the next step?

    If there is a guide which can take me from this point only please advise and I will print and continue. If not I need to know what the next step is.

    To normalize I have Audacity (free) and Goldwave (latest version and paid for.)
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    Assuming you have the video_ts folder and have identified the VOB(s) containing the clips you want,
    you can use DGindex to extract the audio from the VOB.
    You'll find the tool in this package:
    http://www.videohelp.com/tools/DGMPGDec
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  6. What will the files be called?

    Yes, I have some vob files, some ones of about the same but slightly different sizes. I tried to play a couple of them in VLC. They have the standard numbering scheme which you call clips.

    The original has a number of audio file formats including Spanish. I'm wondering how I can play them all in VLC to get them sorted.

    I will get the DGindex and do one series of vob with the same numbering scheme; fisr ending in 1 and then ending in 2.

    Also if admins could correct the spelling in the thread it would appreciated.
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    I can't see any other way to do this than what the others are suggesting....demux the audio, adjust the levels accordingly in an audio editor, and remux when you're done.

    What was the source? Is it a dvd-r download? It sounds like it was messed up before it got to you.

    As for reinventing the wheel....that is not what the suggestions are for. It's common practice when adjusting these things yourself. I don't believe there is any "1 click" solution to this issue.
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  8. You still haven't said what kind of audio it is in the final AVI, MP3, AC3, what? If you don't know, open the AVI in MediaInfo or GSpot and check.
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  9. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    You still haven't said what kind of audio it is in the final AVI, MP3, AC3, what? If you don't know, open the AVI in MediaInfo or GSpot and check.
    Ok, I have not used MediaInfo. And I have GSpot on here.

    The story so far is that the uneven audio is on an original factory dvd. I decrypted that with DVDDecrypter as stated. None of this tells me the hidden file types on the original disk n'cest pas? But I haven't used GSpot yet. This file type lingo is giving me a headache.

    I'll give a look at the avi file made from DVDFab.....

    From Gspot:

    0x2000 (Dolby AC3) AC3
    48000Hz 384 kb/s tot , 6 chnls (3/2 .1)


    What's confusing me is all the TS files and stuff contained within them being different or seemingly intractable from one process to another.

    If this is the only how for for doing this (which I find difficult to imagine-- it must have come up before) please show and explain the work flow as a series of actions.

    Up there at where it says use DGIndex on the vob file sounds like a completely different process. And when that is done the manual for DVDindex says you have to go to AVI synth. The process and work flow need to be described in steps, yes?

    I have not run DGIndex yet, but it seems that the file it converts would not go to avi syth but to the normalizing program. Please clarify while I go find the ibuprofen.
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    Are you trying to normailze the audio from the main movie itself?

    Would you be prepared to accept 2-channel (mp3 or Ac3) or do you need to retain the original Dolby digital 6 channels?

    If you were able to able to demux the existing DVD audio to your hard drive, somebody here would probably assist with the
    normalizing if you posted it to a file sharing site and made it available.
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  11. Member AlanHK's Avatar
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    It is much better to use the original audio source, rather than after it has been degraded by conversions, and it really doesn't take much longer.

    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    With the original media in the dvd drive I ran DVDDecrypter. DVDDC made several huge files
    and some smaller ones producing a folder of 6+ gigabites.
    "Huge files"? Named what?

    I'd guess either VOB or MPEG, which are more or less the same thing.

    DVD audio is almost always AC3.
    If your DVD is not encypted, you could extract the audio from it directly using PGCdemux.


    Otherwise you'll have to use whatever these "huge files" are.

    Its worth trying to use Audacity, if you have the latest version with ffmpeg filter installed, it can read and write almost any format. It can pull the audio out of most kinds of media files.
    Then you can edit, normalise and whatever you like and save it out as MP3, AAC, AC3, etc, and replace the audio in your video file.

    When I'm using AC3 audio as a source for a video, I usually boost it by about 10 decibels.
    (Actually, I use Wavegain, which uses the Replaygain algorithm to calculate the exact gain. I see there is an Audacity plugin that does this now, though I haven't used it -- http://forum.audacityteam.org/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=63067 )
    Last edited by AlanHK; 8th Jul 2012 at 23:30.
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  12. You probably don't need to worry about using the audio from the DVD if you have an encoded AVI version taken from it. If it was encoded using AutoGK it'll only be one of two things.... the original DVD audio (probably AC3) or it'll have been converted to MP3. If it's MP3 and if the AVI was created using AutoGK then it should have been normalized when AutoGK converted it originally (the volume raised until the peaks are at 0db). And that's really it, unless you want to load the audio into an editor so you can compress the peaks to allow you to raise the volume more that way.

    As you said the original DVD and the AVI have the same low volume, it sounds like AutoGK simply copied the DVD audio rather than convert it, so naturally the volume will be the same. It's probably going to be simpler to extract the audio from the AVI, re-encode it while increasing the volume, and then use the newly encoded version to replace the existing audio in the AVI than it'll be to extract it from the DVD again.

    Well it it's not hard to do with the correct tools, but while it's easy if you've done it before, if you haven't it can be hard to work out where to start. If you want to extract the DVD audio just open the DVD files using AutoGK as if you intend to encode it. Use Advanced Settings to make sure the output format is correct. ie select to either keep the original audio or to convert it to MP3, whichever you want. Don't leave it on "auto". Video settings don't matter. Start the encoding process. AutoGK will extract the DVD audio (it uses DGIndex mentioned earlier to do the work) and if you've selected MP3 as the output it'll convert it to MP3. When it's done with the audio it'll start running a compression test. Abort the encode. Navigate to the AutoGK output directory and the agk_tmp folder created within. Inside the agk_tmp folder will be the original audio plus the converted MP3 version if you chose MP3.

    Instead of using the original DVD you can use your AVI version as the source video using the same process as above. If the AVI audio is MP3 AutoGK will extract it, but it won't change the volume, however if it was encoded using AutoGK in the first place that should already have been done. If the AVI audio is the original AC3 (or DTS) AutoGK will extract it and convert it to MP3 as it would when encoding a DVD. Once you open the AVI with AutoGK it'll tell you what type of audio it contains.

    Now, if you've converted the original AC3 audio to MP3 it's volume will have been increased to maximum. If you kept the original AC3.... not so much.
    If it's MP3 you can open your old AVI with VirtualDubMod (it's in in a subfolder where AutoGK is installed but unfortunately I don't think there's a start menu shortcut), use VirtualDubMod to delete the old audio, add the MP3 version, resave it as a new AVI (selecting Direct Stream Copy for the video when saving) and in a minute or so you'll have a new AVI with the new MP3 audio. Changing audio streams happens using VirtualDubMod's "Streams" menu at the top. Chances are you'll need instructions the first time but I only type with two fingers and they're getting tired. Anyone else???

    The main reason you'd usually keep the original AC3 audio in preference to converting it to MP3 is if it's multichannel and you want to keep it that way, although many DVDs also have a stereo AC3 audio track. Whether it's stereo or multichannel though, if you convert it to MP3 AutoGK will still normalize it for you (increase the volume until the peaks are at 0db). If you want to keep multichannel audio while also raising the volume as much as possible you'll need to convert it "manually" once AutoGK has extracted it for you as AutoGK only "converts" to stereo, but I'll give my typing fingers a rest.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 9th Jul 2012 at 02:47.
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  13. I will try to read through these discussions. For me they are just discussions that show no process. Let's pick one and not get sidetracked on issues that haven't come up.

    From reading quickly I see that the source files from DVDDecrypter will have less degradation than a DVD rip which I have as an AVI. That is already posted as a file share to answer another part of all this text with no process. The AVI is on a file share site and so is availabe for someone who knows the programs to work on it.


    It is late here. I'll look things over again tomorrow but try to stick to process how-to rather than a haystack of program names. Please.
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  14. One other thing I thought of about the haystack of do this and do that programs:

    GSpot shows exactly what type of audio and video are in an AVI file. It's a front end information program. Why can't the normalization or other sound processing be vastly shortened by some sort of program chain available from the front end?

    Example. I learned some things using that MediIndex prog or whatevs mentioned above. It showed the source routines that DVDFab used to create the AVI. AGK is another one I think that installs AVIsynth and a bunch of other programs when it is installed.

    Years ago I tried to play with this (AVI Synth etc.) and either had the wrong equipment (working with a capture card and VHS as I recall) or wasn't smart enough. I can't say I'm any smarter these days.
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  15. @hello_hello

    I am now caught up before bedtime. Where was AutoGK mentioned at all?

    DVDFab was used for the AVI. and DVDDecrypter was used to extract the TS/vob set.
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  16. Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    If it was encoded using AutoGK it'll only be one of two things.... the original DVD audio (probably AC3) or it'll have been converted to MP3.
    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    First off, the AVI made was done in DVDFab.
    I have no idea what audio DVDFab uses or if people have a choice, but either it's the original AC3 or unnormalized MP3. And, yes, if getting MP3 out of AutoGK, it would be normalized. The problem might be if there's some sort of a volume spike in a single spot which might throw out the normalization for the whole thing. In that case you'd need a WAV Editor to fix it.

    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    It is late here. I'll look things over again tomorrow but try to stick to process how-to rather than a haystack of program names. Please.
    For some reason you resolutely refuse to tell us the kind of audio in the AVI, and it was the AVI you originally wanted to fix, not the audio in the source DVD:

    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    Is there any way to manually adjust the volume from the AVI components?
    And if it's MP3, as is common in AVIs (or if you're willing to create an MP3 following hello_hello's instructions), it might be a simple matter to fix.
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  17. Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    @hello_hello

    I am now caught up before bedtime. Where was AutoGK mentioned at all?

    Your first post:
    "I only have any experience using DVDfab and AGK and have not done anything complex with AVI. "

    I guess I foolishly assumed as you mentioned it you're likely to know how to use it and probably have it installed.

    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    DVDFab was used for the AVI. and DVDDecrypter was used to extract the TS/vob set.
    DVD Decrypter could be used to rip the DVD no matter how it was converted to AVI and I had no idea DVDFab could convert DVDs to AVI. Most people (here) only use DVDFab for ripping DVDs. Apparently it's a fairly average video converter.
    I must have missed where you said you used DVDFab for converting and I definitely missed where you posted the info about the AVI audio (#9), although it appears everyone else missed that too.. I think because you mentioned DVDFab I thought it referred to the ripped DVD files. I wish I hadn't missed it as it would have saved me wasting my time with all that typing.

    Given you're not exactly experienced with video converting and you appear to have the original DVD, if it were me I'd either convert the whole thing again (audio and video) using a program which can convert and normalize mutlichannel audio, or with a program which can use your existing AVI as the source, copy the video, re-encode the audio and output them as a new AVI for you.

    The "easiest" program I can think of which can do either is ffcoder. Yes you need need to also install AVIsynth for some "advanced" functionality, and it appears audio normalization is one of them, but ffcoder does all the work so you don't need to know how to use AVIsynth. Someone else may be able to think of an even easier program.

    It doesn't matter whether you convert the audio from the DVD or the AVI as it's the same audio. I'd have considered downloading the AVI and fixing the audio for you given you've uploaded it, but as you don't seem overly appreciative of the help offered so far and I assume you must have been too busy complaining about the progress of the thread to remember to include a link to it..... I guess not.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 9th Jul 2012 at 11:59.
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  18. [QUOTE=hello_hello;2173141]
    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    I must have missed where you said you used DVDFab for converting and I definitely missed where you posted the info about the AVI audio (#9), although it appears everyone else missed that too..
    Well, I did for sure. My turn to apologize. Yeah, if he wants to keep the AC3 (since it'll have to be reencoded, I think, a decent quality MP3 track might suffice), then it'll have to be run through a WAV Editor to boost the volume and maybe other things. And messing with 6 channels is way harder than is messing with two.

    But I think I remember AlanHK mentioning something about a program that can boost the volume of an AC3 track, similar to the way MP3Gain does for MP3 audio.
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  19. Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    I must have missed where you said you used DVDFab for converting and I definitely missed where you posted the info about the AVI audio (#9), although it appears everyone else missed that too..
    Well, I did for sure. My turn to apologize. Yeah, if he wants to keep the AC3 (since it'll have to be reencoded, I think, a decent quality MP3 track might suffice), then it'll have to be run through a WAV Editor to boost the volume and maybe other things. And messing with 6 channels is way harder than is messing with two.

    But I think I remember AlanHK mentioning something about a program that can boost the volume of an AC3 track, similar to the way MP3Gain does for MP3 audio.
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  20. There seems to be various opinions on whether to use audio from the disk or from the AVI (naming labels aside.)

    Since there seems to be confusion as whether I ever could identify the audio on the disk, I did this:

    First I looked at the box the dvd came in. Nothing there that was helpful. Nothing on the disk either though it of course has the normal printed packaging.

    I opened DVDFab to look at the audio section. It shows what I think is a Dolby symbol followed by AC3/4.

    Also mentioned previously was the manner/style of audio tracks. It occurred to me that
    if front and back speakers were not on my system this would account for the levels problems. I don't know that that is so.

    Simple two channel stereo is the only thing that makes sense. I do not have some "home theater" setup where all that is needed.

    Interesting that videohelp did not know or follow what I said about DVDfab making AVI output. That is done under what is called the Generic tab on the main screen where exotics like ipod and so on are listed. This is the only thing I've ever really understood about it. I would use Nero for a disk copy job.

    And yes I mentioned I had some scant understanding of AGK as well. I have only used that to resize AVI files downward to make them more compact. Haven't really done much with that for some time.


    Now on to a selected method of work. I have answered the question about the audio on the disk which is Dolby AC3/4 using the main screen of an older edition of DVDFab. Does that say what is needed to process the output from DVDDecrypter?

    Gspot gave the output audio as described above asFrom Gspot:

    0x2000 (Dolby AC3) AC3
    48000Hz 384 kb/s tot , 6 chnls (3/2 .1)



    Does that say what is needed to process the AVI output from DVDFab as simple two channel stereo?


    Two questions about two processes.


    @hello_hello:

    Yes, using the original media and doing the normalizing routine in one process would be preferred b/c it sounds the simplest for someone like myself. I do not know what program might do that.


    Maybe we have both learned something today. What remains is settling on how to do the job and staying with it until completion. I mentioned patience would be necessary.
    Last edited by loninappleton; 9th Jul 2012 at 13:29. Reason: typos
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  21. Easiest, perhaps, would be to start over again with the DVD on the hard drive and let AutoGK do it. Open the IFO (or the first VOB, if you don't need subs), and go into the Advanced Settings to choose MP3 audio (and maybe a Fixed Width), and the bitrate you want. It might take a couple of hours to encode and with luck you'll get louder audio when done.

    By the way, have you played the DVD in a standalone DVD player (not in the computer)? The reason I ask is that sometimes the AC3 Filter outputs low-volume audio. This would be true, though, for all DVDs played on the computer, and not just this one. If it sounds louder in the standalone played to a TV set, it might only require (installing and) adjusting a setting in the AC3 Filter.
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  22. Member
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    There is a simple method I've used in the past, if you want to do it manually.

    Install Avisynth, FFdshow, Virtualdub and Lame MP3 ACM, if not already installed. Download DGMPGdec and unpack.
    In FFDshow Audio Decoder Config, set the mixer to 2/0/0 stereo.

    Open DGindex (dgmpgdec folder) open the VOB(s) and save the project (d2v and ac3 audio)

    Create a simple script like this in Notepad, and save it as newaud.avs or similar.

    LoadPlugin("c:\path_to_dgmpgdec folder\DGDecode.dll")
    vid=MPEG2source("c:\path_to d2v\yourfile.d2v")
    aud=directshowsource("c:\path to ac3\yourfile.ac3",video=no)
    audiodub(vid,aud)

    Open the script in Virtualdub. Set Audio/Full Processing. Then, Audio/Compression.
    Select "Lame MP3" on the left, and choose the bitrate on the right (I suggest 192 CBR). OK out.

    File/Save WAV. This will save a WAV file. Rename the file with the mp3 extension. This is the new audio.
    FFDshow does an excellent job of down-mixing and normalizing the volume.
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  23. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Easiest, perhaps, would be to start over again with the DVD on the hard drive and let AutoGK do it. Open the IFO (or the first VOB, if you don't need subs), and go into the Advanced Settings to choose MP3 audio (and maybe a Fixed Width), and the bitrate you want. It might take a couple of hours to encode and with luck you'll get louder audio when done.

    By the way, have you played the DVD in a standalone DVD player (not in the computer)? The reason I ask is that sometimes the AC3 Filter outputs low-volume audio. This would be true, though, for all DVDs played on the computer, and not just this one. If it sounds louder in the standalone played to a TV set, it might only require (installing and) adjusting a setting in the AC3 Filter.

    I don't usually do long quotes but this seems worthwhile.

    Manono, you are right, I have not tried to play the original disk in my Sony standalone player. I will do so. One thing I learned from viewing some of the AVI last night was that the sound changes at about 11 minutes. But I have still noticed elsewhere in the AVI that levels seem different in the same scene as if being sent to different channels. I only have 2 channel stereo. My receiver amp is a Yamaha RP-U100 which has standard stereo audio outputs.

    I will report back if I can hear any difference in playback, or no.
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  24. Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    There is a simple method I've used in the past, if you want to do it manually.

    Install Avisynth, FFdshow, Virtualdub and Lame MP3 ACM, if not already installed. Download DGMPGdec and unpack.
    In FFDshow Audio Decoder Config, set the mixer to 2/0/0 stereo.

    Open DGindex (dgmpgdec folder) open the VOB(s) and save the project (d2v and ac3 audio)

    Create a simple script like this in Notepad, and save it as newaud.avs or similar.

    LoadPlugin("c:\path_to_dgmpgdec folder\DGDecode.dll")
    vid=MPEG2source("c:\path_to d2v\yourfile.d2v")
    aud=directshowsource("c:\path to ac3\yourfile.ac3",video=no)
    audiodub(vid,aud)

    Open the script in Virtualdub. Set Audio/Full Processing. Then, Audio/Compression.
    Select "Lame MP3" on the left, and choose the bitrate on the right (I suggest 192 CBR). OK out.

    File/Save WAV. This will save a WAV file. Rename the file with the mp3 extension. This is the new audio.
    FFDshow does an excellent job of down-mixing and normalizing the volume.
    Well this seems like a complete solution. I made the quote so I wouldn't lose my place. Because AGK is installed I should have all the components but I will check including LAME. I can follow the procedure above but I get confused about the "start file" to find in the VOB files output from DVDDecrypter. But I believe I can visually inspect vob's with VLC to find opening title sequence.

    --> If a WAV is created how does Humpty get put back together again?
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  25. Update,

    I have replayed the DVD in the stand alone dvd player and manono was right to the best I can tell: the audio in the opening chapters was effected by the transcoding process to AVI.

    Would a redo of the disk using makemkv then handbrake or vidcoder fix the problem without having to resort to wave form normalizing? Or is there another AVI tool, preferably freeware that does not produce the problem?

    Alternatively, I have noticed a volume change in the first three chapters.

    Question: are the "chapters" another word for the 21 (I think) vob files decrypted by DVDDecrypter? If so can they be worked on separately?

    Lots of questions but my knowledge is catching up a bit with my interest.

    Elsewhere I was doing some wiki reading to straighten out what I don't know. That is a daunting task as well, but I d/led Avanti and ffmpeg in case they are needed. Please advise if there is a better GUI for ffmepg than Avanti from current releases.
    Last edited by loninappleton; 9th Jul 2012 at 16:57. Reason: clarity
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  26. Member
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    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post

    --> If a WAV is created how does Humpty get put back together again?
    Do you mean add the new wav (or MP3) back to the existing AVI file ?
    It's extremely simple, accomplished in Virtualdub with the minimum of fuss.

    Open the avi. video/direct stream copy . Audio/audio from other file (point to the new audio file)

    File/save as avi
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  27. Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    Yes, using the original media and doing the normalizing routine in one process would be preferred b/c it sounds the simplest for someone like myself. I do not know what program might do that.
    Well I typed a long post which included an explanation of AutoGK and the fact it normalizes audio when converting it to MP3, yet you asked what AutoGK had to do with it. I explained you could use AutoGK on the original DVD files or using your existing AVI if it contained the same AC3 audio. At the time though, you still hadn't managed to answer the question as to whether you wanted to keep the multichannel audio or whether stereo was fine.

    Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
    Well this seems like a complete solution. I made the quote so I wouldn't lose my place. Because AGK is installed I should have all the components but I will check including LAME. I can follow the procedure above but I get confused about the "start file" to find in the VOB files output from DVDDecrypter. But I believe I can visually inspect vob's with VLC to find opening title sequence.

    --> If a WAV is created how does Humpty get put back together again?
    And I recall also explaining you could use AutoGK to perform the above task for you because they're the tools it uses, how you could use your current AVI as the source (as it contains the original AC3 and you don't need to re-encode the video), and it turns out it's a process you're obviously familiar with given you now say you've used it to re-encode AVIs in the past.
    I explained where to find the audio after AutoGK extracts it, along with where to find the encoded MP3 version it creates.
    I explained where to find VirtualDubMod on your hard drive and roughly how to use it to open your existing AVI and replace the AC3 audio with the encoded MP3 version. Thankfully I didn't bother typing detailed instructions on how to use VirtualDubMod.

    Personally I doubt there's any need to be adjusting the volume chapter by chapter. The player might be performing some sort of volume leveling making them sound different when you play them individually. Just normalize the whole audio as one complete file and see what it's like. If for some extremely unusual reason that's not good enough, worry about doing it another way then.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 10th Jul 2012 at 01:23.
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  28. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    But I think I remember AlanHK mentioning something about a program that can boost the volume of an AC3 track, similar to the way MP3Gain does for MP3 audio.
    Unlike MP3Gain it must re-encode the audio, and it uses AVIsynth which may be too scary, but I'll take a guess you're thinking of AC3Gain. http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/258002-Mini-How-To-Increase-Your-AC3-Volume
    It seems to also apply dynamic range compression, which in this case may be a good thing, or not...

    And of course you'd have to manually use VirtualDubMod to extract the audio from the existing AVI, run AC3Gain, then use VirtualDubMod to replace the original AC3 with the newly encoded version.
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  29. Yep, that's the one I was thinking of. Good, thanks for explaining. So it doesn't work at all like MP3Gain. Too bad, as that's a handy little program.
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  30. I am back and going to take a stab at using AGK to do this task.

    @hello_hello I apologize for reading past what was said earlier about AGK. It is simply better to present the ideas in small chunks for someone who is trying to absorb a lot of things all at once. I will likely go back and read the whole thread again. HH, because your knowledge seems so thorough on this, a stick how-to might be a good idea. Early on I asked if there were any guides. The long post indeed has a lot of what we've found (I hope) is needed.

    And I did mention patience early on. Reminds me a bit of Baldrick.


    AGK does not auto install DIVX so I had to do that this morning. It gave a prompt to do so. This board is relatively new and when setting up I did an install from scratch. There may be other things still needed.

    I will run AGK on the AVI file made in DVDFab. We've determined with GSpot that the AVI contains AC3 audio so (from above):

    "Instead of using the original DVD you can use your AVI version as the source video using the same process as above. If the AVI audio is MP3 AutoGK will extract it, but it won't change the volume, however if it was encoded using AutoGK in the first place that should already have been done. If the AVI audio is the original AC3 (or DTS) AutoGK will extract it and convert it to MP3 as it would when encoding a DVD. Once you open the AVI with AutoGK it'll tell you what type of audio it contains."

    This will be as far as I go because the next series of procedures should be done one at a time. I have not done these things before in AGK. Back in a while.
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