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  1. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2010
    Location: Romania
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    I'm working with PAL DV video in Premiere Pro CS3. After I import the dv clips in premiere, I edit them, I correct their tonality, and I remove their color cast. After that, I export the movie with debugmode frameserver, and I use avisynth and x264 to encode them to H.264.

    Some clips have alot of noise because they were recorded in low light.

    I don't know when it is best to denoise the clips: before importing them in Premiere Pro, of after I export the movie with debugmode framesever, using denoise filters in avisynth. Does the noise affect color correction in Premiere ?
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
    Location: Canada
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    Originally Posted by codemaster View Post
    I'm working with PAL DV video in Premiere Pro CS3. After I import the dv clips in premiere, I edit them, I correct their tonality, and I remove their color cast. After that, I export the movie with debugmode frameserver, and I use avisynth and x264 to encode them to H.264.

    Some clips have alot of noise because they were recorded in low light.

    I don't know when it is best to denoise the clips: before importing them in Premiere Pro, of after I export the movie with debugmode framesever, using denoise filters in avisynth. Does the noise affect color correction in Premiere ?
    Yes it does.

    Noise affects the limits to which you can push or adjust footage in color grading . The most common example - When you boost shadow areas, noise will often be revealed. It's usually very bad with low light DV footage

    Overdenosing can be just as bad - when you overdenoise 8bit video, often you will reveal banding along gradients. People often dither and add back fine noise or use grain

    When to do it? It's usually best to do it as you are color correcting because otherwise you don't know how much to denoise or what areas to denoise. This is harder to do with a frameserver setup, easier to do if you have a denoiser right in premiere (e.g. neat video plugin for premiere) . It's also easier to apply through masks when you do it in premeire (so specific areas of a frame get filtered); harder to do in avisynth . It depends on what needs to be done specifically, but you could make your adjustments in PP , then filter afterwards to clean it up in avisynth
    Last edited by poisondeathray; 26th Apr 2012 at 13:33.
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