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  1. Hi.

    I have a m2v video stream and I could see it has a text section inside it, as shown below:

    Code:
    General
    Complete name                    : D:\Work\VideoFile.m2v
    Format                           : MPEG Video
    Format version                   : Version 2
    File size                        : 3.78 GiB
    Duration                         : 1h 37mn
    Overall bit rate                 : 5 544 Kbps
    
    Video
    Format                           : MPEG Video
    Format version                   : Version 2
    Format profile                   : Main@Main
    Format settings, BVOP            : Yes
    Format settings, Matrix          : Default
    Format settings, GOP             : M=3, N=12
    Duration                         : 1h 37mn
    Bit rate mode                    : Variable
    Bit rate                         : 5 316 Kbps
    Nominal bit rate                 : 7 500 Kbps
    Width                            : 720 pixels
    Height                           : 480 pixels
    Display aspect ratio             : 16:9
    Frame rate                       : 23.976 fps
    Standard                         : NTSC
    Color space                      : YUV
    Chroma subsampling               : 4:2:0
    Bit depth                        : 8 bits
    Scan type                        : Progressive
    Scan order                       : 2:3 Pulldown
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)               : 0.642
    Stream size                      : 3.63 GiB (96%)
    
    Text
    ID                               : DVD-2
    Format                           : EIA-608
    Muxing mode                      : DVD-Video
    Stream size                      : 0.00 Byte (0%)
    Using GomPlayer or MPC-HC the subtitle stream doesn't appear.
    So, how I can view or extract that text? Any idea?
    Thank you.
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2004
    Location: California,United States
    Search Comp PM
    Don't know about M2V files but for Vob files I use CCExtractorGUI.
    Seem like it should also work with M2Vs as well.

    Tony
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
    Location: Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Are you sure there is a text stream? Size is reported to be 0.00 bytes

    Where is this from ?
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  4. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    Are you sure there is a text stream? Size is reported to be 0.00 bytes
    Yes, poisondeathray, now I can see that. At first look, reading fast, I thought it was 0%. And because text fills too fewer room than video, it'd be Ok. But you're right. It's 0 bytes

    Now I'm trying to install dotNet 3.5 because I want to test the suggestion from cal_tony, CCExtractor (thx, cal_tony).

    But my dotNet standalone installer is claiming the lack of dotNet 2.0 !!! And can't install before I install 2.0!

    Why this things are that way??? Who was the genius who invented these things like dotNet self-dependant?
    dotNet 4.0 would supply all previous versions, but NOT!
    And I gain the "bonus" having to restart machine at every install. (WinXP-SP3)

    And small programs like this, or rmtpexplorer, or other tiny ones, requires huge dotNets flavours to run...
    Hard to swallow.

    Sorry for bad mood...
    Last edited by jairovital; 13th Apr 2012 at 12:13.
    Thank you.
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  5. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    Where is this from ?
    I'm cleaning my folders and found this m2v. I'm not sure, but I'm almost sure that it came from PGCdemux, because this is the tool I almost always use to rip from DVDs vobs.
    Thank you.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
    Location: Canada
    Search Comp PM
    I think text streams are held within the container (e.g. when it's in VOB, or transport stream for broadcast streams), so when you demux to .m2v it's gone. That's why it reads as zero
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  7. Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
    I think text streams are held within the container (e.g. when it's in VOB, or transport stream for broadcast streams), so when you demux to .m2v it's gone. That's why it reads as zero
    poisondeathray, I was agreeing with you and losing hopes to see any CC or subtitle inside that m2v file, but...

    ...but cal_tony is the winner tonight! And hurray for CCExtractor. It could findd that text, inside an elementary stream, like m2v. MediaInfo had already gave the tip: text stream inside.

    Here is the log:


    Code:
    CCExtractor 0.61, Carlos Fernandez Sanz, Volker Quetschke.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Input: D:\Work\VideoFile.m2v
    [Raw Mode: Broadcast] [Extract: 1] [Stream mode: Autodetect]
    [Program : Auto ] [Hauppage mode: No] [Use MythTV code: Auto]
    [Timing mode: default] [Debug: No] [Buffer input: Yes]
    [Use pic_order_cnt_lsb for H.264: No] [Print CC decoder traces: No]
    [Target format: .srt] [Encoding: Latin-1] [Delay: 0] [Trim lines: No]
    [Add font color data: Yes] [Add font typesetting: Yes]
    [Convert case: No] [Video-edit join: No]
    [Extraction start time: not set (from start)]
    [Extraction end time: not set (to end)]
    [Live stream: No] [Clock frequency: 90000]
    Start credits text: [None]
    Creating D:\Work\VideoFile.srt
    
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Opening file: D:\Work\VideoFile.m2v
    
    File seems to be an elementary stream, enabling ES mode
    
    Analyzing data in general mode
    
    
    New video information found
    [720 * 480] [AR: 03 - 16:9] [FR: 04 - 29.97] [progressive: no]
    
    
    Number of NAL_type_7: 0
    Number of VCL_HRD: 0
    Number of NAL HRD: 0
    Number of jump-in-frames: 0
    Number of num_unexpected_sei_length: 0
    
    Total frames time:      01:37:44:792  (175768 frames at 29.97fps)
    incl. pulldown frames:  00:19:32:905  (35152 frames at 29.97fps)
    
    Min PTS:                01:00:04:000
    Max PTS:                02:37:42:934
    Length:                 01:37:38:934
    
    Initial GOP time:       01:00:04:000
    Final GOP time:         02:37:42:734 +6F
    Diff. GOP length:       01:37:38:734 +6F    (01:37:38:934)
    
    Total user data fields: 11729
    DVD-type user data fields: 11729
    
    Done, processing time = 79 seconds
    Performance (real length/process time) = 74.18
    This is beta software. Report issues to cfsmp3 at gmail...
    I got a file with more than 1500 subtitles (lines), in a CC fashion way, with left and right justified sentences. Also hearing impaired lines.

    One more tool to my toolbox.
    Thank you.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    EIA-608 closed captions are stored in the MPEG-2 GOP user data. In my experience, de-multiplexing by itself does not remove them. I have had to demultiplex many files containing my recorded TV shows to use freeware editors and authoring programs, and could always extract the closed captions afterwards. Re-encoding the video will remove them, and Restream can be used to strip them, if for some reason they have to be eliminated.
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  9. For those who want to see by himself, here one piece of the m2v and its cc attached.
    Thank you.
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  10. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    EIA-608 closed captions are stored in the MPEG-2 GOP user data. In my experience, de-multiplexing by itself does not remove them.
    More good information. It had been a mystery for me where subtitles and Ccaptions are hiding inside vobs, m2v and so on. I know they are images, pictures, but seems they merge itself inside the video stream, carrying timecodes with them. And demux operations keep them intact.

    Very good structure when it was been planned.
    Thank you.
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  11. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by jairovital View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    EIA-608 closed captions are stored in the MPEG-2 GOP user data. In my experience, de-multiplexing by itself does not remove them.
    More good information. It had been a mystery for me where subtitles and Ccaptions are hiding inside vobs, m2v and so on. I know they are images, pictures, but seems they merge itself inside the video stream, carrying timecodes with them. And demux operations keep them intact.

    Very good structure when it was been planned.
    DVD subtitles are stored as images. Closed captions are not stored as images, and are not human readable until decoded, either by a N. American TV or by software.
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  12. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Potplayer shows them:
    Amazing!

    Indeed. One more excellent player! Thx, jagabo.
    When I started this thread I didn't know I would find 2 very cool tools.
    Thank you.
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  13. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    DVD subtitles are stored as images. Closed captions are not stored as images, and are not human readable until decoded, either by a N. American TV or by software.
    Yes. It explains the fact that CCExtractor could get the cc without OCR. It extracted as text, very fast.
    For subtitles, inside vobs, is needed SubRip and OCR tasks to extract them. It makes sense.
    Thank you.
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  14. This PotPlayer is very good! And the best news is that it is the same of GomPlayer, but better. It has the very same hotkeys and better codec/filters management. Beside the fact it can see the Closed Captions living inside elementary videos.

    Great discover!

    I think GomPlayer will have a short life here...
    Thank you.
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  15. I know VLC is a very good one and it has many fans here, but its hotkeys aren't so friendly.
    I use it when something goes wrong.
    It's the survival kit.
    Thank you.
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