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  1. I have a Canon Vixia HF S200 HD camcorder. I have my settings set for AVCHDvideo quality. Now when playing back footage on my computer after it's uploaded the video quality is awesome. I pit a few clips together for some buddies and when I tried burning to a DVD the file was too large and wouldn't burn. Now when I first starting editing the footage I had the option to choose which format I wanted it in, so naturally I chose the AVCHD because I wanted highest quality. So I understand that AVCHD is 1080, but is 1080 not DVD and only Blu Ray? If so is DVD only 720? I use Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum just as an FYI. Is there any way to convert this to DVD format, it's not a huge deal if not, I can redo the video, I would just like to know where I went wrong. If so, what would I need to do to be able to burn and use Blu Ray? Thanks!
    Aaron
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Dvd is neither 1080 nor 720, it is 480 (or 576 if PAL).

    If you go DVD, you should be encoding MPEG2.

    How much - in terms of program length (minutes) is your material?

    Scott
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  3. Only 2 minutes, not long at all.
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  4. Member edDV's Avatar
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    In Vegas MS Platinum you can export to DVD (MPeg2 720x480) or Sony AVC (for 1920x1080 Blu-Ray) under "Render as".
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  5. Awesome, now what all do I need to be able to burn, and watch my video in true 1080? Also, is the MPeg2 the highest quality you can have for a DVD?
    Last edited by Johnson32; 10th Apr 2012 at 12:31.
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  6. Member yoda313's Avatar
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    You need to either make an avchd on dvdr or get a bluray burner and burn as an authored bluray to bluray recordable discs.

    Edit - that is for physical media playback - if you have a device that can playback h264 in a mp4 or mkv file than you can simply output the file that way. Though not all devices will playback camera files as is. Some reencoding may be necessary. And if its a really large file (over 4gb) you will have to use ntfs or split the file (as units like the ps3 can only read fat32 usb drives). But if you have a recent bluray player you might be able to read h264 files on a ntfs drive - read your manual to be sure.

    oh and avchd can only be played on "most" bluray players including the ps3 and of course computers. They won't play on dvd players.
    Donatello - The Shredder? Michelangelo - Maybe all that hardware is for making coleslaw?
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  7. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    ??

    First you say:
    I pit (sic) a few clips together for some buddies and when I tried burning to a DVD the file was too large and wouldn't burn.
    Then you say:
    Only 2 minutes, not long at all.
    It is PHYSICALLY IMPOSSIBLE to make a 2 minute-long video be unable to fit a DVD- EVEN at the highest BD rates, let alone DVD rates! (40Mbps max = 600MB for 2 minutes).

    So either the 1st thing you said is wrong/confused, or the 2nd. I'm guessing the 2nd, especially if you were editig clips together. What would the TOTAL, EDITED length be?

    To clear up some other confusion, note that AVCHD is, in most cases, a special SUBSET of the BD spec. IOW, it's meant for BD discs (or DVD discs at a reduced bitrate/timelength***), and has a similar structure to BD, and is USUALLY meant for HD video not SD.

    To be able to see true HD from your footage, you need to:

    1. Edit your material (as 1080, throughout the chain)
    2. Render to 1080 ("AVCHD template" or similar) h.264. (don't forget the audio in your calculations or steps either - AC-3 or PCM).
    3. Author to BDMV (if you truly have a BD burner) or AVCHD (if you only have a DVD burner, regardless of what it plays)
    4. Burn, using ImgBurn or the burning engine in your authoring app.

    ***Note that if this is burning to DVD, your max bitrate is 18Mbps for all streams combined.

    If you want HD AND you want it on DVD, the only way is to use AVCHD, or WMV9HD (or some other proprietary HD file that you can play on your PC only). Otherwise, you're SOL.

    I was led to believe from your 1st post that you were looking at SD/DVD alternatives to your HD originals...

    Scott
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  8. Member yoda313's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by cornucopia
    It is PHYSICALLY IMPOSSIBLE to make a 2 minute-long video be unable to fit a DVD- EVEN at the highest BD rates, let alone DVD rates! (40Mbps max = 600MB for 2 minutes).
    Is there any chance a 3d camera would make larger files? I don't know since I don't have one. Or is it just the same output but different internal data for the 3d?
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  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Yes, the new 3D portion of the AVCDHD 2.0 spec has an upper limit of 28Mbps. Think of it as a lite, consumer version of the BD3D spec. Note that AVCHD 2.0 DOES NOT officially support DVD as a medium of playback - BD only (or possibly USB/HDD).

    Instead of the standard AVC (h.264) codec, you would have MVC (3D-supported version of AVC) which is USUALLY backward-compatible for 1 of the 2 streams (L?), but NOT for the other (R?). On BD3D these exist within the M2TS & SIFF transport streams (with hard links to remove redundancy and maintain 2D compatibility). Don't know how they exist on AVCHD, but I would think it is similar...

    Scott
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  10. I must have done something wrong, because when I originally tried burning my video to a DVD it said that the file was too large, and it is only 2 minutes long. So everything I said before was correct, but I must have done something wrong. I burnt my DVD as a MPEG 2 and it burnt fine and worked well. Since your saying that even at the highest quality I could still make that short of a video fit on a DVD, what is quality called? I have a whole list of things I can convert the video to to burn it. I believe you that it will fit, I must just be confused.
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  11. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Johnson32 View Post
    I must have done something wrong, because when I originally tried burning my video to a DVD it said that the file was too large, and it is only 2 minutes long. So everything I said before was correct, but I must have done something wrong. I burnt my DVD as a MPEG 2 and it burnt fine and worked well. Since your saying that even at the highest quality I could still make that short of a video fit on a DVD, what is quality called? I have a whole list of things I can convert the video to to burn it. I believe you that it will fit, I must just be confused.
    Too large in file size or too large for frame size? DVD (for DVD player) is limited to 720x576. A DVD player will reject anything larger. A standard DVD must be MPeg2 at total bit rate max of ~9.8 Mbps (1x speed). Some players will also play Divx/Xvid/Wmv as files not as authored DVD.

    Be clear if you are trying to play an AVCHD file on a Blu-Ray player? There are several ways to do this depending on the capabilities of the player. All players support authored h.264 in m2ts wrapper (bdmv folder on BDR media) with a variety of audio codecs. Some players support AVCHD disc on DVDR media (BDMV folder) with more restricted bit rates. Figure ~ 20 minutes per layer.

    Media players, computers and some Blu-ray players can play certain types of HD files directly. You can burn files to DVDR or BDR discs with Imgburn. Or play them off a USB flash drive or via Ethernet from a server.

    Be specific what you are trying to do.
    Last edited by edDV; 10th Apr 2012 at 15:06.
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  12. I'm sorry, i'm completely new at this. Sometime in the future I would like to have full HD 1080 footage being played on TV. When I render off of Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum I have a bunch of different options on what I can render to. I chose MPeg2 for a DVD, and it worked fine. Now what would I have to render to, to be able to have 1080 HD footage on a Blu Ray disk?
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  13. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    1080i or 1080p (depending upon your source), using h.264 (aka AVC) in M2TS (MPEG2 Transport Stream) or MP4 container (maybe others, depending on what your authoring app will accept).
    Rates:
    <=18Mbps (if going to DVD media), <=24Mbps (if going to BD media), <=28Mbps (if 3D/AVCHD2), or <=40Mbps (if going to BD media as BDMV), or <=48Mbps (if going to BD media as 3DBD).
    Don't forget - Audio as AC-3 (aka Dolby Digital) <=640kbps, or LPCM (similar to WAV), 2ch, 48kHz, 16bit.

    Then, author these assets in your authoring app of choice (if you've got VegasMSHDP, you should have DVDArchitect!) to either AVCHD format or BDMV/BDAV format. There are a few differences that depend on your licensing and on how complicated you are making the project/program.

    Then, burn to BD (R or RE depending on how long you plan on keeping this stuff).

    Unless you've got some SPECIAL DVD player, the only thing you can play on DVD players is SD material (aka Standard DVD-Video/MPEG2).
    Whether playing AVCHDonDVD, AVCHDonBD, BDMVonBD, etc, those all require using BD players to be able to support HD playback.

    Scott
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  14. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Johnson32 View Post
    I'm sorry, i'm completely new at this. Sometime in the future I would like to have full HD 1080 footage being played on TV. When I render off of Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum I have a bunch of different options on what I can render to. I chose MPeg2 for a DVD, and it worked fine. Now what would I have to render to, to be able to have 1080 HD footage on a Blu Ray disk?
    Do you have a DVDR writer?

    Do you have a Blu-ray BDR writer?

    Do you have a Blu-ray player? Make and model?

    If others want to see it, what is their Blu-ray player?

    This will narrow your encoding options. The DVDA program that came with Vegas will render and burn a Blu-Ray compliant disc playable by all. Done. I seldom use it because I'm mostly burning for myself and my players.
    Last edited by edDV; 10th Apr 2012 at 20:41.
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