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  1. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Hi everyone. I am going to buy my first BR burner and have pretty much narrowed it down to one of the below 2 Pioneer models. I can't find any differences in the 2 other than model number and price, even on Pioneer's website I don't see any difference. I have a couple questions.

    Number one, do any of you know if there is a difference in specs or performance? Secondly, neither of these units come with software. Do I need software, if so can you tell me where to find it? I am running Windows XP Pro, SP3, Athlon 64x2, Dual Core 2.0Ghz processor, 2G Ram DDR3 PC3200, 320GB HD. Thank you very much for your help and I hope everyone has a pleasant evening.

    BDR - 206DBK
    BDR - 206
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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  2. Member fritzi93's Avatar
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    Aren't you over-thinking this, I mean, three threads on the subject? Just busting your chops.

    You could ask at MyCE.com, there's probably someone there who knows specifically and/or can explain the model naming conventions. They're into that stuff over there. But I'd bet on there being no real difference.

    Software? ImgBurn is the essential. I got PowerDVD with my BD-ROM and with my burner, I got the full Cyberlink Suite, including a newer version of PDVD plus BD authoring and a bunch of other useless junk. It's worse than Nero, if you can believe that, and incredibly bloated. I did give it a go, then uninstalled. Both those software discs are in a drawer around here somewhere, but I sure as hell won't use them.

    Apart from ImgBurn, if you need a player, TMT is the only decent one, but it's not free or bundled with anything, AFAIK. I got TME bundled with my HD-PVR, and its player is essentially the same as TMT. But I guess you could get by with a free bundled version of PDVD if necessary. Or just use something like MPCHC to play m2ts files directly bypassing the menus.

    So besides burning software and a player, what else you need depends on what you're going to do. I'm guessing a decrypter too like ANYDVDHD, DVDFab, or DVDFabPasskey, the latter two having free versions that are updated more slowly than the pay version (the former), or with limited functions (the latter). I get by with mostly free programs available in the tools section.

    Good luck.
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  3. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    Aren't you over-thinking this, I mean, three threads on the subject? Just busting your chops.

    You could ask at MyCE.com, there's probably someone there who knows specifically and/or can explain the model naming conventions. They're into that stuff over there. But I'd bet on there being no real difference.

    Software? ImgBurn is the essential. I got PowerDVD with my BD-ROM and with my burner, I got the full Cyberlink Suite, including a newer version of PDVD plus BD authoring and a bunch of other useless junk. It's worse than Nero, if you can believe that, and incredibly bloated. I did give it a go, then uninstalled. Both those software discs are in a drawer around here somewhere, but I sure as hell won't use them.

    Apart from ImgBurn, if you need a player, TMT is the only decent one, but it's not free or bundled with anything, AFAIK. I got TME bundled with my HD-PVR, and its player is essentially the same as TMT. But I guess you could get by with a free bundled version of PDVD if necessary. Or just use something like MPCHC to play m2ts files directly bypassing the menus.

    So besides burning software and a player, what else you need depends on what you're going to do. I'm guessing a decrypter too like ANYDVDHD, DVDFab, or DVDFabPasskey, the latter two having free versions that are updated more slowly than the pay version (the former), or with limited functions (the latter). I get by with mostly free programs available in the tools section.

    Good luck.
    Thanks fritzi93 for that info and the links.

    What I am going to do is, back up copies of my originals (both SD and BD) so the originals do not get destroyed hopefully. So I need software to shrink the originals sometimes (All I ever back up is the movie and 1 audio type? I have been using ImgBurn for several years now for SD Backups and really like it. BR will be totally new to me, have never tried it yet, that's why I am looking for suggestions on a BR burner and BR software. Have still been using ripit4me and DVDShrink to author, sometimes use DVDFAB (Free Version) when necessary. Yes I am like you, I try to use free software where possible if I don't have to sacrifice quality. I want the best backup copy (audio and video) I can get, even if it calls for buying a software to do so. Specs for my computer are in my profile, I think I have all I need there in order to backup BR discs.

    Thanks again for the suggestions and I hope more of you chime in to help as well.
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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  4. Member fritzi93's Avatar
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    For backing up Blu-Rays, BDRebuilder is a good choice.

    I, too, do movie-only and one audio and one sub stream. I hate warning screens, trailers and waiting for a menu to load. It's all wasted space to me, when the movie, at maximum quality, is the thing.

    Typically, I'll extract movie-only with Clown_BD and at the same time convert the audio to AC3 5.1 at 640 kbps, which saves considerable space. (AC3 at that bitrate is supposedly "transparent"). Perhaps half the time the result is small enough to fit on a BDR without re-encoding. For those that require a re-encode with BDRB, you'll still retain maximum possible quality with movie-only and AC3.

    Now, some will object that you don't need the extra step with Clown_BD. But occasionally the main movie will be split into multiple m2ts files, along with PiP and/or structure protection that can confuse BDRB. OTOH, Clown_BD is fully reliable for extracting main movie, even when you have a new release with new protection, and your decrypter does not yet have updates to deal with it. That's my experience anyway.

    If you don't often buy new releases, you can probably get by with DVDFabHDDecrypter, the free version of DVDFab. Or use DVDFabPasskey "Lite". I suspect you can use that (it's driver-level, just run it in the background) and extract main movie with Clown_BD direct from disc.

    Good luck.

    [EDIT] Figure on running an encode overnight with your specs at BDRB defaults. I'd recommend using the High-Speed BD25 option, it's faster without the analysis pass, still good quality. Best to rip and encode to a hard drive separate from your OS drive, if you can.
    Last edited by fritzi93; 3rd Apr 2012 at 19:48.
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  5. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    For backing up Blu-Rays, BDRebuilder is a good choice.

    I, too, do movie-only and one audio and one sub stream. I hate warning screens, trailers and waiting for a menu to load. It's all wasted space to me, when the movie, at maximum quality, is the thing.

    Typically, I'll extract movie-only with Clown_BD and at the same time convert the audio to AC3 5.1 at 640 kbps, which saves considerable space. (AC3 at that bitrate is supposedly "transparent"). Perhaps half the time the result is small enough to fit on a BDR without re-encoding. For those that require a re-encode with BDRB, you'll still retain maximum possible quality with movie-only and AC3.

    Now, some will object that you don't need the extra step with Clown_BD. But occasionally the main movie will be split into multiple m2ts files, along with PiP and/or structure protection that can confuse BDRB. OTOH, Clown_BD is fully reliable for extracting main movie, even when you have a new release with new protection, and your decrypter does not yet have updates to deal with it. That's my experience anyway.

    If you don't often buy new releases, you can probably get by with DVDFabHDDecrypter, the free version of DVDFab. Or use DVDFabPasskey "Lite". I suspect you can use that (it's driver-level, just run it in the background) and extract main movie with Clown_BD direct from disc.

    Good luck.

    [EDIT] Figure on running an encode overnight with your specs at BDRB defaults. I'd recommend using the High-Speed BD25 option, it's faster without the analysis pass, still good quality.
    Thanks again Fritzi93 for the great info. Now this kind of response is what I have been looking for my software suggestions.

    Don't forget the BD burner, what are the differences in these 2 Pioneers, and do you think I am making the right choice?
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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  6. Member Noahtuck's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    BDR - 206DBK
    BDR - 206
    Do you have some links to those ?

    And maybe I missed it, but I did not see it mentioned anywhere, Iwould only use ImgBurn for burning Bluray's, not to mention DVD's.

    And Newegg has this LG Bluray burner on sale for $69.99 with free shipping.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136241&nm_mc=EMC-IGNEFL040312..._-27136241-L0F

    I bought an LG Bluray burner back in nov. 2011 and i have now burned 70+ BDR's without a hitch.
    Last edited by Noahtuck; 3rd Apr 2012 at 19:58.
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  7. Member
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    i believe both are the same...the "BK" part just means black...my guess is the 206 comes with software and the DBK model doesn't. Newegg only has the DBK model Amazon has both but are both the same price. SPecs are the same it looks like

    Potplayer plays BR's fine...that's if you don't really care about menus. MPC HC does also
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  8. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    For backing up Blu-Rays, BDRebuilder is a good choice.

    I, too, do movie-only and one audio and one sub stream. I hate warning screens, trailers and waiting for a menu to load. It's all wasted space to me, when the movie, at maximum quality, is the thing.

    Typically, I'll extract movie-only with Clown_BD and at the same time convert the audio to AC3 5.1 at 640 kbps, which saves considerable space. (AC3 at that bitrate is supposedly "transparent"). Perhaps half the time the result is small enough to fit on a BDR without re-encoding. For those that require a re-encode with BDRB, you'll still retain maximum possible quality with movie-only and AC3.

    Now, some will object that you don't need the extra step with Clown_BD. But occasionally the main movie will be split into multiple m2ts files, along with PiP and/or structure protection that can confuse BDRB. OTOH, Clown_BD is fully reliable for extracting main movie, even when you have a new release with new protection, and your decrypter does not yet have updates to deal with it. That's my experience anyway.

    If you don't often buy new releases, you can probably get by with DVDFabHDDecrypter, the free version of DVDFab. Or use DVDFabPasskey "Lite". I suspect you can use that (it's driver-level, just run it in the background) and extract main movie with Clown_BD direct from disc.

    Good luck.

    [EDIT] Figure on running an encode overnight with your specs at BDRB defaults. I'd recommend using the High-Speed BD25 option, it's faster without the analysis pass, still good quality.
    Thanks again Fritzi93 for the great info. Now this kind of response is what I have been looking for my software suggestions.

    Don't forget the BD burner, what are the differences in these 2 Pioneers, and do you think I am making the right choice?
    I just googled both numbers, but there were so many sites I really don't remember the addresses to the ones I clicked on, sorry I can't help more.
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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  9. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    I would get the Pioneer -- not the LG.
    The Pioneer works quite nicely.

    It's $87 right now: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004ILKH64/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=thdifa-20&link...SIN=B004ILKH64
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  10. BuskerAlley.com zoobie's Avatar
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    one may be an OEM drive so it's got no software or cables included and the other may be retail with cables and possibly software included
    Author, Producer, Composer, Director - Sony AVCHD & HDV, Konica SLR, LG BD burner
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  11. Member
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    The BDR-206 and BDR-206DBK are both OEM drives. Pioneer's product page for the BDR-206 doesn't provide much technical information, but there is probably some difference between it and the BDR-206DBK that accounts for the fact the Pioneer charges less for the BDR-206.

    The BDR-2206 (or BDR-2206B5PK at Amazon) is Pioneer's retail package in the series, and includes bundled software, but I couldn't find anything that said it includes a SATA cable or screws. The BDR-2206 can also read from and write to DVD-RAM discs, which is something the BDR-206DBK can't do based on the manufacturer's spec sheet.

    Pioneer also has a newer BD burner, the BDR-207DBK, available for about the same price as the BDR-206DBK.

    If bundled software, a SATA cable, and screws aren't needed, then buying a bare OEM burner might save a few dollars.
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  12. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Where would I buy the software and cable or cables and what is the model number of the cable(s) that I would need?
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Where would I buy the software and cable or cables and what is the model number of the cable(s) that I would need?
    This is the only source I found selling Pioneer's bundled software for its 206 series drives as a separate purchase http://www.meritline.com/pioneer-bd-solution-blu-ray-burner-software---p-68724.aspx

    I saw a review at the same site for the BDR-207 drive which hinted that this particular OEM bundled software won't install unless a Pioneer drive is installed, and the software's validation process did not recognize the BDR-207.

    If you are replacing an existing SATA optical drive, then you won't need to buy any cables or screws. Otherwise, a standard SATA data cable is what you need for a full-height internal BD drive. If all the SATA power connections from your power supply are in use, but you have a IDE/Molex power connector available, you will need a Molex to SATA power adapter cable. The screws for mounting optical drives as well as both types of cables can be found online at Amazon, NewEgg, TigerDirect, and Directron, and at many other stores selling computer parts.
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  14. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Where would I buy the software and cable or cables and what is the model number of the cable(s) that I would need?
    This is the only source I found selling Pioneer's bundled software for its 206 series drives as a separate purchase http://www.meritline.com/pioneer-bd-solution-blu-ray-burner-software---p-68724.aspx

    Thanks usually for this link.


    I saw a review at the same site for the BDR-207 drive which hinted that this particular OEM bundled software won't install unless a Pioneer drive is installed, and the software's validation process did not recognize the BDR-207.

    If you are replacing an existing SATA optical drive, then you won't need to buy any cables or screws. Otherwise, a standard SATA data cable is what you need for a full-height internal BD drive. If all the SATA power connections from your power supply are in use, but you have a IDE/Molex power connector available, you will need a Molex to SATA power adapter cable. The screws for mounting optical drives as well as both types of cables can be found online at Amazon, NewEgg, TigerDirect, and Directron, and at many other stores selling computer parts.

    I am removing my defective Pioneer 111L (God rest its soul, it was great for about 3-4 years). I assume that was a SATA cable on my 111L, is there any way of identifying it as such?
    Thanks again Usually for this info. Don't think I would ever buy a software package that works with just one brand of burners? Have a wonderful evening.
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Where would I buy the software and cable or cables and what is the model number of the cable(s) that I would need?
    This is the only source I found selling Pioneer's bundled software for its 206 series drives as a separate purchase http://www.meritline.com/pioneer-bd-solution-blu-ray-burner-software---p-68724.aspx

    Thanks usually for this link.


    I saw a review at the same site for the BDR-207 drive which hinted that this particular OEM bundled software won't install unless a Pioneer drive is installed, and the software's validation process did not recognize the BDR-207.

    If you are replacing an existing SATA optical drive, then you won't need to buy any cables or screws. Otherwise, a standard SATA data cable is what you need for a full-height internal BD drive. If all the SATA power connections from your power supply are in use, but you have a IDE/Molex power connector available, you will need a Molex to SATA power adapter cable. The screws for mounting optical drives as well as both types of cables can be found online at Amazon, NewEgg, TigerDirect, and Directron, and at many other stores selling computer parts.

    I am removing my defective Pioneer 111L (God rest its soul, it was great for about 3-4 years). I assume that was a SATA cable on my 111L, is there any way of identifying it as such?
    Thanks again Usually for this info. Don't think I would ever buy a software package that works with just one brand of burners? Have a wonderful evening.
    These days, I can easily believe there is such a thing as OEM bundled software that will only install when specific drives from one manufacturer are installed. OEM bundled software is almost always older software, sometimes it is even a stripped-down version of that, but at $13, the disc I linked to is cheap and provides some basic functionality for a BDR-206DBK.

    Current BD player software is expensive by comparison. Cyberlink's PowerDVD 12 costs $50, $80 or $90 depending on the version. Total Media Theatre 5 costs $100, and Corel WinDVD 11 is $60.

    The Pioneer 111L may be an ATAPI/IDE burner. I can't find a reference that tells me what interface it has. Look for a picture of a SATA II data cable using Google. If that is what you see when you open the case, you have a SATA drive. If you see a ribbon cable instead, it isn't a SATA drive and you may need the two cables I mentioned, but you won't need screws.

    [Edit]If you presently have an IDE drive, make sure you have a SATA connection available on the motherboard to use for a new drive.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 4th Apr 2012 at 19:07.
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  16. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Where would I buy the software and cable or cables and what is the model number of the cable(s) that I would need?
    This is the only source I found selling Pioneer's bundled software for its 206 series drives as a separate purchase http://www.meritline.com/pioneer-bd-solution-blu-ray-burner-software---p-68724.aspx

    Thanks usually for this link.


    I saw a review at the same site for the BDR-207 drive which hinted that this particular OEM bundled software won't install unless a Pioneer drive is installed, and the software's validation process did not recognize the BDR-207.

    If you are replacing an existing SATA optical drive, then you won't need to buy any cables or screws. Otherwise, a standard SATA data cable is what you need for a full-height internal BD drive. If all the SATA power connections from your power supply are in use, but you have a IDE/Molex power connector available, you will need a Molex to SATA power adapter cable. The screws for mounting optical drives as well as both types of cables can be found online at Amazon, NewEgg, TigerDirect, and Directron, and at many other stores selling computer parts.

    I am removing my defective Pioneer 111L (God rest its soul, it was great for about 3-4 years). I assume that was a SATA cable on my 111L, is there any way of identifying it as such?
    Thanks again Usually for this info. Don't think I would ever buy a software package that works with just one brand of burners? Have a wonderful evening.
    These days, I can easily believe there is such a thing as OEM bundled software that will only install when specific drives from one manufacturer are installed. OEM bundled software is almost always older software, sometimes it is even a stripped-down version of that, but at $13, the disc I linked to is cheap and provides some basic functionality for a BDR-206DBK.

    Current BD player software is expensive by comparison. Cyberlink's PowerDVD 12 costs $50, $80 or $90 depending on the version. Total Media Theatre 5 costs $100, and Corel WinDVD 11 is $60.

    The Pioneer 111L may be an ATAPI/IDE burner. I can't find a reference that tells me what interface it has. Look for a picture of a SATA II data cable using Google. If that is what you see when you open the case, you have a SATA drive. If you see a ribbon cable instead, it isn't a SATA drive and you may need the two cables I mentioned, but you won't need screws.
    Thanks again, Usually, some great info and insight that I need to know, really appreciate the help and your time. Have a pleasant evening.
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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    Oh, I have one more piece of advice. Given your PC specs, you need to download and run Cyberlink BD and 3D Advisor. It will tell you if your setup meets the basic criteria required for Blu-Ray Player software. http://www.cyberlink.com/stat/bd-support/enu/index.jsp
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  18. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Thanks a million usually, glad you thought of that, thank you.
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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  19. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    The software is usually a waste. VLC works fine for playing video.
    And if you're really hard up, you can buy a SATA cable for less than $1.

    "Retail packages" are for newbies.
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  20. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    The software is usually a waste. VLC works fine for playing video.
    And if you're really hard up, you can buy a SATA cable for less than $1.

    "Retail packages" are for newbies.
    Thanks Lordsmurf, I kind of thought that but just wanted to confirm. Have a wonderful day.
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    The software is usually a waste. VLC works fine for playing video.
    And if you're really hard up, you can buy a SATA cable for less than $1.

    "Retail packages" are for newbies.
    Thanks Lordsmurf, I kind of thought that but just wanted to confirm. Have a wonderful day.
    You must rip the disc first then use VLC to or MPCHC to play .m2ts files. VLC and MPCHC do not work for playing Blu-Ray discs directly.
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  22. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    One thing I need to mention is this. I do not intend on watching blu-ray movies on my computer. Therefore I don't want to buy a bunch of unnecessary equipment such as an HD 3D monitor. Yes I want to backup my BR and BR 3D movies but that is for the kids room and the HT room.

    After checking with Cyberlink BD and 3D Advisor to see if my computer is ready for BR this is what it said:

    Basic BR Disc Playback 3D Content Playback Support

    CPU - AMD 6 4x2 Du. Co. 3800 Upgrade Upgrade
    GPU Upgrade Upgrade
    Graphics Card Upgrade Upgrade
    Sys. Memory Pass Pass
    Oper. Sys. Pass Pass
    Graphics Card Driver Pass Pass
    Viewsonic 20" Std. Mon. Upgrade Upgrade

    I really don't think I need to upgrade anything but the CPU (Maybe the Mother Board) and buy a BR burner to just burn backups. Would someone tell me if I am right or wrong and what do I really need to get this done. According to Cyberlink I might as well buy a whole new computer it sounds like. Thanks for the help and input guys.
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  23. Member golfnut's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    The software is usually a waste. VLC works fine for playing video.
    And if you're really hard up, you can buy a SATA cable for less than $1.

    "Retail packages" are for newbies.
    Thanks Lordsmurf, I kind of thought that but just wanted to confirm. Have a wonderful day.
    You must rip the disc first then use VLC to or MPCHC to play .m2ts files. VLC and MPCHC do not work for playing Blu-Ray discs directly.
    Thanks usually_quiet, that's a good point for most but I do not watch any kind of movies, SD or BR, on my computer. My 10' screen and projector and 7.2 setup definitely have me spoiled.
    Thank You,

    GolfNut
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    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by golfnut View Post
    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    The software is usually a waste. VLC works fine for playing video.
    And if you're really hard up, you can buy a SATA cable for less than $1.

    "Retail packages" are for newbies.
    Thanks Lordsmurf, I kind of thought that but just wanted to confirm. Have a wonderful day.
    You must rip the disc first then use VLC to or MPCHC to play .m2ts files. VLC and MPCHC do not work for playing Blu-Ray discs directly.
    Thanks usually_quiet, that's a good point for most but I do not watch any kind of movies, SD or BR, on my computer. My 10' screen and projector and 7.2 setup definitely have me spoiled.
    You may want to to watch at least some of the ripped Blu-ray before burning, to be sure the ripping process was successful. If the movie is already decrypted, then the CPU isn't won't be used for decryption during playback and you won't need an HDCP compliant monitor and video card. However if the the GPU is an older one and doesn't have the capability to decode H.264 video, then the burden will fall on your CPU. You may need a new video card in that case. Also, at least some releases of VLC use VLC's own internal codecs which make the CPU do the work of decoding unless you enable GPU hardware acceleration. I can't remember what policy MPCHC has regarding GPU hardware decoding for video.
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  25. Member [_chef_]'s Avatar
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    The BDR-2206 is the BDR-206D for the NA market only, bundled with software, means retail package.
    Like iwthin DVD burner days, 206 means drive with DVD-RAM write capabilities, 206D without, OEM drive is the wrong term.
    They either are sold as BULK or RETAIL. BK just means BLACK, also SV drives are rarely available, SV means SILVER.
    The BDR-206M however was the first BD XL capable burner on the market.

    Even more confusion with the 207 drives, depending on where you live or where you buy your drive(s).
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    I got the BDR-207EBK (european market), which is equal to the 207M or 2207 of the NA market. This is a great drive, evolution of the 206M, at a lower price...
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    Originally Posted by [_chef_] View Post
    The BDR-2206 is the BDR-206D for the NA market only, bundled with software, means retail package. Like iwthin DVD burner days, 206 means drive with DVD-RAM write capabilities, 206D without
    The specs at Pioneer's US website say the BDR-2206 sold in the US can both read from and write to DVD-RAM. See http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Computer/Computer+Drives/BDR-2206

    Originally Posted by [_chef_] View Post
    OEM drive is the wrong term. They either are sold as BULK or RETAIL.
    Typically, "bulk " and "OEM" are used interchangeably to mean a bare drive sold without accessories by major retailers in the US like newegg. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827151244 Maybe you should write to all of them and tell them to re-write the descriptions in their catalog to meet your standard of correctness.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 23rd Apr 2012 at 19:19.
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  28. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
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    Originally Posted by ND-Mir View Post
    I got the BDR-207EBK (european market), which is equal to the 207M or 2207 of the NA market. This is a great drive, evolution of the 206M, at a lower price...
    The BDR-2207 retail package isn't available in the US yet. I hope it shows up soon.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 24th Apr 2012 at 09:12. Reason: correct a typing mistake
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