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  1. Hi all, sorry this more an over simplistic question to ask and I'm guessing there are loads of different view on this. But here goes

    I would like to rip my Blu-ray discs and store them on HD to play on my media center PC. Obviously 50GB is a bit heavy going for storage space. I'm just after an easy method to rip and the best format to store them. Balancing quality against compression.

    Is DivX HD a good format?

    Obviously, I understand the more the compression the more the loss of quality.

    Like I say, ease of ripping and encoding are the key here.

    Any words of wisdom would be most gratefully received.

    Thanks,

    Andy.
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
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    I would use mkv with h264 video and keep the audio(ac3, dts-hd,etc). Around 4-8GB for a movie in 1080p video and you will get very good quality.

    Easiest ripper and converter is probably dvdfab blu-ray ripper. Maybe not the best video quality though.

    Easiest free solution is to rip with dvdfab hddecrypter and convert with vidcoder. Ripbot264 might be a better converter but it's not as simple as vidcoder.
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  3. Thanks for the pointers. What sort of file size can you get down to without sacrificial too much quality?
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  4. Member fritzi93's Avatar
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    I'd say about 8G would be a reasonable compromise for the "average" movie, so long as you re-encode the audio to AC3.

    BDRB is another nice tool. It can output to MKV as well as BD25/9/5.

    Good luck.
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  5. Thanks again guys. I'll have a play.

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  6. Member hech54's Avatar
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    Too much like work. Squash BluRay down to 8GB? I'll just buy the DVD thanks.
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  7. Member dragonkeeper's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by hech54 View Post
    Too much like work. Squash BluRay down to 8GB? I'll just buy the DVD thanks.
    It's been my experience that most people can not tell the diff between the original Blu-ray and BD9 version of the movie while being played. Even at 8gb the quality is much better than you see on DVD, after initially watching the movie the first time in BD, does one necessarily need to watch it again in BD if they merely trying to find something to do to pass time? But if one wants to see the movie in all its HD glory the original is always available and ready to be inserted into the blu-ray player.

    I actually do the same thing but I have several media PCs in my home with a central file server, I no longer have to haunt all over the house to find movies someone neglected to put back on the self. I don't have to leave my bedroom to go down stairs to the theater room to find a movie. All my TV shows, music, and movies are at my finger tips, and readily available to stream to any TV in the house. Was a bit of work to set up, but now all my precious disk are locked away free of greasy finger prints and it's been years since I had a disk mysteriously vanish only to be found later under someones bed or in a couch.

    @strontium_99 Good luck with your endeavor, as stated i do the same thing and to me it is very much worth the effort. I can now find any movie, or favorite TV episodes with a few mouse clicks.
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    Originally Posted by hech54 View Post
    Too much like work. Squash BluRay down to 8GB? I'll just buy the DVD thanks.
    Of course I agree with him completely. Maybe my reason is that so many BRs are just not as good a quality as they should be.

    There has been recent discussion about 120 and 240hz TVs that can make the movie look like Hidef videos rather than film. I watch all my movies that way. The clearer the better. So, I'm not about to re-encode to a lesser bitrate..

    I also transfer all my BRs to MKV immediately. Most of them have never seen the inside of my PS3. This mainly done for 2 reasons. I want to watch the movie not the items that the BR supplier wants to sell me. Secondly, I like subtitles but I don't like them in the middle of my screen and I don't like them to be 3" tall on my big screen tv's.

    I convert all my subtitles to srt and hech54 might say that might also be too much work. However, all my subtitles are now about 1" tall and with all wide screen movies that have upper and lower black bars they now reside in the black bar area below the movie and not inside of the movie. For 168 movies, I have the at the very bottom of the screen.

    Tony
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  9. Member fritzi93's Avatar
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    Well, I'm doing less and less re-encoding myself, for two reasons: I added a lot more hard drive space and I got a Blu-Ray burner. No more AVCHDs.

    I've found many (most?) Blu-Rays don't require re-encoding the video to fit BD25 if you do movie-only and convert the audio to AC3 640 kbps. (For those that do require a re-encode, my newly built 6 core comp will do it in less than an hour). Many of my Blu-Rays have never been played on my set-tops; I hate menus and warnings and trailers and all that other junk so intensely.

    Nevertheless, a Blu-Ray re-encoded to BD9 size (or ~8 GB MKV) can look pretty good. Try it and compare. Now I know edDV can tell, he's a pro, but I have a hard time telling the difference.
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  10. Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    (For those that do require a re-encode, my newly built 6 core comp will do it in less than an hour).
    Does the two extra cores really make that much difference? It normally takes me about 2-2.5 hrs to re-encode.

    Guess I'll be hitting newegg up soon...
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  11. Member fritzi93's Avatar
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    Yeah it does. All cores (3.5 GHz OC) going flat out at 97-100% constant. Mind you, I do movie-only in BDRB using one-pass High Speed BD25 setting. Takes about 30-35 minutes at 3.6x or so for the re-encode itself (two-hour movie), the remux and rebuild together take 22-24 minutes. Not counting extraction though, so I guess that puts it over an hour by a little.

    The 6-core Phenom IIs have dropped a good bit in price since the Bulldozer CPUs rolled out. The BE (black edition) CPUs are easy to do a simple multiplier overclock (Core FID in the BIOS). Though I had to also nudge the Core VID a touch from 1.3250 volts to 1.3375 volts to get it stable. Using the stock CPU fan/heatsink, which is pretty decent, although a bit loud. Runs Prime95 now for an hour no problem. It'll do 3.4 GHz stable with only the multiplier overclock.
    Last edited by fritzi93; 28th Oct 2011 at 21:18.
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  12. Member dragonkeeper's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by mrswla View Post
    Does the two extra cores really make that much difference? It normally takes me about 2-2.5 hrs to re-encode.

    Guess I'll be hitting newegg up soon...
    Same here. i would love to be able to shorten my encode times by an hour..

    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    I hate menus and warnings and trailers and all that other junk so intensely.
    Agreed I just wanna watch the friggin movie i just paid $25 dollars for, between load times and all the BS crap they add it takes 3 min or more to get to the movie on some titles.
    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    Nevertheless, a Blu-Ray re-encoded to BD9 size (or ~8 GB MKV) can look pretty good. Try it and compare. Now I know edDV can tell, he's a pro, but I have a hard time telling the difference.
    The only way i can tell is by looking at stills, when the movie is playing it's next to impossible for me to tell the diff and i would like to think I have a good eve.
    Last edited by dragonkeeper; 28th Oct 2011 at 22:16.
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  13. if it helps, I rip my Blu-rays with DVDFab 8 QT. I use avi. H.264. Audiocopy setting. I also rip the other audios and mux them togethere. When the audio is DTS, I use MKV because i notice errors with AVI with it. By the way, the videos end up being between 4-9 GB depending on their lenght, etc. They look very clean.
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  14. Member fritzi93's Avatar
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    Apologies for going a little OT.

    Just to note a couple potential encoding bottlenecks:

    1) The Win7 preferred VC-1 decoder (WMP) seems to be less well-threaded than ffdshow's ffmpeg-mt (multi-thread) decoder for AVC. I get more like 2.5x when encoding VC-1.

    2) Any AviSynth script is going to be a significant bottleneck. Whether you add filters or just do a resize to 720p.
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    Originally Posted by strontium_99 View Post
    Hi all, sorry this more an over simplistic question to ask and I'm guessing there are loads of different view on this. But here goes

    I would like to rip my Blu-ray discs and store them on HD to play on my media center PC. Obviously 50GB is a bit heavy going for storage space. I'm just after an easy method to rip and the best format to store them. Balancing quality against compression.

    Is DivX HD a good format?

    Obviously, I understand the more the compression the more the loss of quality.

    Like I say, ease of ripping and encoding are the key here.

    Any words of wisdom would be most gratefully received.

    Thanks,

    Andy.
    Easiest and quickest is to rip it without re encoding. Should be half the size with no compromise in quality.
    Option A
    Use MakeMKV to create an MKV file

    Option B
    You'll need to be running AnyDVD or DVD Passkey in the background.

    1 - Load the Blu-Ray into BDinfo and locate the correct playlist
    2 - Load the playlist into TSMuxer
    3 - Select the correct language TruHD audio track and click "Downconvert HD Audio"
    or
    3a - If available, select the correct language AC3 track; Most BRs don't include the multi-channel Eng AC3 track.
    4 - Check .m2ts as the destination file type and select the destination file name.
    5 - Go

    Either method should take about 30-45 minutes. You'll get a 15-25GB .m2ts file that is full HD quality with full DTS or AC3, multi-channel audio.

    If you want an even smaller file, use Ripbot264 or Handbrake to compress the file you made in step 1. The defult settings (high profile) are pretty good from either program, just make sure to select a CQ/CRF setting of 18 or lower.

    To give you any further advice invites a long-winded discussion into which one of the 9,000 h264 settings should be tweaked for best quality v. size v. encode time.

    I could offer more advice if I new what you were going to be using for playback.
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  16. Thanks for the in depth guide. Nice one.
    I'll try it out today.
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  17. Member
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    i usualy use ripbot. it converts to mp4, mkv, avchd disk.easly croping denoising and deinterlancing.you can select output size.there is no hard to select anything
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