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  1. Member
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    I am building a new computer and would like to know if there is a preferred motherboard out there for video editing? I just got a new GIGABYTE | GA-Z68X-UD4-B3 Z68 RT and did not get the one with integrated graphics that they also sell. I am planning on getting an Nvidia card. Anyone care to comment? Thanks.
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  2. Member
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    Just put a new box together about a month ago and did get the Gigabite with the integrated audio and video. I suppose separate cards would be better but, the integrated board does the job for me. Works better than I thought it would for editing and watching BRs.

    Tony
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  3. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    weird board. why have a z68 without the chipset's video ports so you can use the onboard graphics of the i3/i5/i7? even the lowly sub $100 z68 motherboards have them.
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  4. Member
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    What cpu did you get and how much memory?
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  5. Member
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    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    weird board. why have a z68 without the chipset's video ports so you can use the onboard graphics of the i3/i5/i7? even the lowly sub $100 z68 motherboards have them.
    Excuse me? Your post is confusing. I am not sure what you are trying to say really. Anyway you could reword this so I can understand what you are trying to say?
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  6. The CPU has onboard graphics.

    The chipset (z68) allows for using the CPU's onboard graphics.

    The board, which supports a CPU with onboard graphics, and has a chipset that supports onboard graphics, has no graphics port.

    That is weird.

    As for your original question, unless you are going to use the CPU's built-in graphics processing features, which few softwares currently support, the mobo has almost nothing to do in terms of video editing, other that being functional. Enough RAM slots, and SATA ports, and it will run the CPU you have chosen, that's about it.
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  7. Member
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    Which will mean more resources. I will never use an onboard graphics chip. Maybe good for some things but as far as I have heard not good for video editing.
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  8. Member
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    video editing doesnt use graphics power. its all cpu man. get a quad core or 6 core cpu.
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  9. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Which edit/encoding software are you using? Check the CPU benchmarks. Get the fastest CPU you can afford. 4GB RAM is usually enough unless your software specifically recommnds more and can back that up with performance tests.

    I'd get a basic AVIVO HD or Purevideo HD card now, then upgrade after the software guys perfect GPU Assist. This could take years. Display cards have quick obsolescence.
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  10. Member
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    Originally Posted by craig198 View Post
    video editing doesnt use graphics power. its all cpu man. get a quad core or 6 core cpu.
    Actually that is not true. Sony Vegas Pro 11 uses the gpu also. The cuda on nvidia and also some of the memory is what I was told from sony. Adobe also uses some gpu. Well, actually this is the rendering part of it but to me that is still the editing part.
    Last edited by ingeborgdot; 12th Sep 2011 at 22:43.
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  11. Member olyteddy's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ingeborgdot View Post
    Originally Posted by craig198 View Post
    video editing doesnt use graphics power. its all cpu man. get a quad core or 6 core cpu.
    Actually that is not true. Sony Vegas Pro 11 uses the gpu also. The cuda on nvidia and also some of the memory is what I was told from sony. Adobe also uses some gpu. Well, actually this is the rendering part of it but to me that is still the editing part.
    And guess what? Most of the stuff that can use CUDA cores can also use Intel HD 2000 & HD 3000 cores.
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  12. Member
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    You lost me there. My ignorance is showing. HD 2000?
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  13. Member edDV's Avatar
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    My point was money should be directed to CPU over display card for most edit/encoding tasks.

    A typical video edit computer will run through more than one display card vs cpu/motherboard.
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  14. Member
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    Yeah, you are probably right.
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  15. Member
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    edDV or anyone I have a question about computer setup with designating the hdds and setting them up for a purpose. I will have a C drive for the OS and Vegas Pro and a couple of other programs( most of my programs will go on another hdd). How should I set up my other drives and how does this actually work. I want the arrangement of this to be where I get the fastest time with my video editing that I can. That is what is stumping me. Does this make any sense? I hope so.
    Last edited by ingeborgdot; 13th Sep 2011 at 10:25.
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  16. Drive speed is usually only an issue with video capture or when working with uncompressed or losslessly compressed files. Otherwise you're only looking at a few seconds difference here and there.
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  17. Member
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    Is there a place where a person can go to find how to set up a computer for video editing? I just want to make sure that I put my files in the right hdd and render to the right place etc. How do the experts do it? Thanks.
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  18. Member
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    Here is what one place is saying.
    C: Boot drive. 500GB or bigger. A 7200 RPM drive will work just fine. If you want faster bootup and program opens, right now a 10K RPM drive is a better value than SSD, but not as fast.
    D: RAID for Video. Can be internal or external. For External we recommend G-Tech and Glyph.
    • Option 1:A pair of drives RAID 0 gives you performance and value. 2 x 2TB= 4TB of usable space, but no redundancy if a drive fails.
    • Option 2: 4 drives set up as a RAID 5. This gives you performance plus redundancy. 4 x 2TB = 6TB of usable space
    E: Export drive. Single 7200RPM drive. Your exports will go smoother and faster if you output the files to a dedicated physical drive, rather than the D: RAID. Another benefit of having a dedicated E: drive is that you can use it for back-ups, digital photo library, MP3 library, etc.
    (Note: You can also set up a partition or folder on your C: drive for the exports. Not as good as a dedicated drive, but better than exporting to the same drives as your project resides on.)



    I am having a tough time understanding what is going to go on D drive? What is going to go on E drive? Which one should capture go on? Where should I render to? What do they mean when they say exports?

    He then writes back and says.
    You put the OS and all programs on C. You also put your docs and non-medial files on C:
    The D drive is for all your video media. This includes video, audio, photos, projects etc. You import, capture and use this drive for everything related to content creation. We recommend a RAID for the D: Drive
    "The E drive is optional. It is for your export files from your timeline. If you do not have an E: drive we recommend exporting to a folder on the C: Drive"
    Can anyone tell me what he is saying here?

    I mean your final output video that you will then burn to DVD or blu-ray. or upload to the web or iTunes.
    There is no "Back to tape" anymore. Your render files while editing will be on the D: drive with your projects and media
    Last edited by ingeborgdot; 13th Sep 2011 at 14:24.
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  19. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    My usual HDD setup is a small boot drive. I favor a 150GB WD Raptor 10K RPM at present. A SSD about the same size would be maybe better, but more expensive. A large boot drive is just a waste of space, IMO. I only keep my programs on it. Smaller drive defrag quicker and usually has faster access.

    Then I add at least two large HDDs. Mostly WD Black or Samsung 1 - 1.5TB sizes. I don't see a purpose for RAID 0 unless you are editing raw video. And that's rare unless you have pro video equipment. Maybe RAID 1, or better, 5, for redundant storage.

    My present PC used for editing has the 150GB BOOT drive, a 1TB EDIT, two 1TB STORAGE drives, (1 and 2). I also have connected LAN storage for extra storage and archiving. It uses two LCD monitors. One for video and the other for the program page.

    I edit or encode between the large drives. I back up to my LAN hard drives and to Blu-ray media. (25GB)
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  20. Member
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    Okay, two large drives. What program do you use to edit with?

    My main question is where do you put your capture? Where do you put your render? Where do you put your final after authoring with menu and burn to DVD?
    I use Vegas Pro. I capture, edit, render, pick up with architect and author with menu and burn. Capture space, render space, authoring architect space. Does this make sense? Where would you put each one for best possible speeds? Thanks.
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  21. Member
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    My method
    step 1 drive D, step 2 drive E, step 3 back to drive D etc.
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  22. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    here it's c: - operating system/programs drive, d: vegas temp, e: f: g: source destination and storage drives.
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  23. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ingeborgdot View Post
    Here is what one place is saying.
    C: Boot drive. 500GB or bigger. A 7200 RPM drive will work just fine. If you want faster bootup and program opens, right now a 10K RPM drive is a better value than SSD, but not as fast.
    D: RAID for Video. Can be internal or external. For External we recommend G-Tech and Glyph.
    • Option 1:A pair of drives RAID 0 gives you performance and value. 2 x 2TB= 4TB of usable space, but no redundancy if a drive fails.
    • Option 2: 4 drives set up as a RAID 5. This gives you performance plus redundancy. 4 x 2TB = 6TB of usable space
    E: Export drive. Single 7200RPM drive. Your exports will go smoother and faster if you output the files to a dedicated physical drive, rather than the D: RAID. Another benefit of having a dedicated E: drive is that you can use it for back-ups, digital photo library, MP3 library, etc.
    (Note: You can also set up a partition or folder on your C: drive for the exports. Not as good as a dedicated drive, but better than exporting to the same drives as your project resides on.)



    I am having a tough time understanding what is going to go on D drive? What is going to go on E drive? Which one should capture go on? Where should I render to? What do they mean when they say exports?

    He then writes back and says.
    You put the OS and all programs on C. You also put your docs and non-medial files on C:
    The D drive is for all your video media. This includes video, audio, photos, projects etc. You import, capture and use this drive for everything related to content creation. We recommend a RAID for the D: Drive
    "The E drive is optional. It is for your export files from your timeline. If you do not have an E: drive we recommend exporting to a folder on the C: Drive"
    Can anyone tell me what he is saying here?

    I mean your final output video that you will then burn to DVD or blu-ray. or upload to the web or iTunes.
    There is no "Back to tape" anymore. Your render files while editing will be on the D: drive with your projects and media
    Following this guy's model, I'd explain it this way (assuming Vegas or Premiere).

    C:\ contains OS and programs

    D:\ is your capture drive, also the location of the temp files ... Vegas calls the temp folder the "Prerendered Files Folder", Premiere calls it the scratch disk. All of your project files go on this disk.

    This drive needs to be a RAID only if you are capturing uncompressed (e.g. from BlackMagic Intensity or Decklink). The number of drives in the RAID depends on the format you are editing. One drive will capture a simple SD stream. Use two drives for uncompressed "Realtime" A/B roll SD. Two drives are enough for simple uncompressed 720 60p, and three for uncompressed 1080 60i.

    Most camcorder, broadcast or digital intermediate formats can be captured to a single drive.

    E:\ would be your "export to" or "render as" destination for timeline encodes.

    Usually this would be a single disk unless exporting uncompressed HD. If editing to uncompressed HD you will need a second RAID for export. Uncompressed HD editing is mainly a post house scenario. You will most likely be exporting in a Blu-Ray format which is fine on a single drive.
    Last edited by edDV; 13th Sep 2011 at 17:37.
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  24. Member
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    Alright, I think I have it, maybe? C-My video program and any important programs I use, + OS
    D is where I capture and set my temp files for vegas
    E is where I render vegas to
    I guess I still wonder where I put my dvd architect rendered files?
    I will have an F for other programs and other things besides.
    What other things can I put on D? E?
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  25. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ingeborgdot View Post
    Alright, I think I have it, maybe? C-My video program and any important programs I use, + OS
    D is where I capture and set my temp files for vegas
    E is where I render vegas to
    I guess I still wonder where I put my dvd architect rendered files?
    I will have an F for other programs and other things besides.
    What other things can I put on D? E?
    D is where you put all captured video and other video/graphics/audio +temp files.

    In Vegas you send "Prerendered Files Folder" to D in Project settings. I make a Vegas_tmp folder.

    where I put my dvd architect rendered files?
    Doesn't matter much because these aren't performance critical. I'd put them on E: for simplicity.

    What other things can I put on D? E?
    First you need to tell us what kinds of source you are capturing to the D drive. Some formats requrie a clean partition at the fast end of the drive.

    E can hold other files.
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  26. Member
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    SD and HDV capture.

    What about temporary file folder in preferences? Where to?
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  27. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ingeborgdot View Post
    SD and HDV capture.

    What about temporary file folder in preferences? Where to?
    DV and HDV are both 25Mb/s (3.5 MB/s) data streams so don't stress the capture drive too much. Just don't do any disk operations on the D drive while capturing.

    Uncompressed SD will stress the D drive. Most people use the Huffyuv codec to lower the bit rate.

    In Vegas Pro you set the temp folder in project settings.

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  28. Member
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    Hey, I have a question about your deinterlace method? I see you have interpolate on. Is that better than blend?
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  29. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ingeborgdot View Post
    Hey, I have a question about your deinterlace method? I see you have interpolate on. Is that better than blend?
    Depends on the material.

    Blend gives typical smear with double vision for fast moving objects.

    Interpolate result is shown in that thread*. A new frame is interpolated from information in both fields. This usually works better for high motion.



    *http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/338074-HD-cam-under-800?
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    Last edited by edDV; 14th Sep 2011 at 08:27.
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  30. Member
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    So for football and basketball the interpolate would be best???
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