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  1. Member
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    I didn't see many things around this in the forums. I would like to know if possible and how to copy the movies recorded on my DVR to my PC.
    I recently got DirecTV and the DVR is the latest HR-24-100. Looking at the back it has the following connections available:

    -S-VIDEO
    -Ethernet
    -SATA
    -USB

    is it possible to "connect" to the program inside the DVR and kind of copy files over to my laptop?
    How my recorded programs can be transferred?
    Will the high def shows keep their resolution?

    Thanks for pointing me to a step-by-step guide, if any is available.
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  2. Member v491138's Avatar
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    I'm only posting this so that I get emails so I can follow this.
    I think I'll learn something from the replies.
    Thanks.
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  3. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by geek2330 View Post
    I didn't see many things around this in the forums. I would like to know if possible and how to copy the movies recorded on my DVR to my PC.
    I recently got DirecTV and the DVR is the latest HR-24-100. Looking at the back it has the following connections available:

    -S-VIDEO
    -Ethernet
    -SATA
    -USB

    is it possible to "connect" to the program inside the DVR and kind of copy files over to my laptop?
    How my recorded programs can be transferred?
    Will the high def shows keep their resolution?

    Thanks for pointing me to a step-by-step guide, if any is available.
    S-Video at SD analog resolution (approx 640x480 at best).
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  4. Member
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    The Hauppage PVR is the easiest way to transfer to your PC.
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  5. As an HD DVR, it also has HDMI and component outputs. Depending on your goals, there is hardware that can record from those outputs in real time at HD resolutions.

    Files cannot be copied from the hard drive of DirecTV DVRs to a computer. It is possible with older Dish Network hardware, but of course that doesn't matter here.
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  6. Member v491138's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by mobie29 View Post
    The Hauppage PVR is the easiest way to transfer to your PC.
    That would be fine for making new recordings, but would it really be the best way to get video currently recorded on the DVR he has into the computer?
    Just a thought here, but wouldn't that ethernet be a way to make that DVR part of his home network and down load the video files directly from the DVRs harddrive? I believe that is the sort of solution sought. I just do not know if that would work or if another way to access the files directly is needed such as connecting a SATA drive to that connection on the DVR and copying to that and then connecting it to the computer to copy from that drive. Doesn't sound quite right to me, but then that is why I got into this. I want to know how to do this too. I would think that the SATA would be eSATA. That would make a little more sense. Then just use an eSATA external drive to move the files. Using a NexStar case would insure that it would connect to the computer via USB if no eSATA were on it. Then again, perhaps the USB could be used with an external USB drive or flash drive. I really do not know, but IF any of those options work, perhaps the network connect would as well and that would likely be the simplest, if not the fastest. I know the SATA route would require an external drive, but might not the USB port be a direct connection? I've ideas, but no way to try them and I'd really like to know the best answer.
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  7. Member
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    Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    As an HD DVR, it also has HDMI and component outputs. Depending on your goals, there is hardware that can record from those outputs in real time at HD resolutions.

    Files cannot be copied from the hard drive of DirecTV DVRs to a computer. It is possible with older Dish Network hardware, but of course that doesn't matter here.

    I didn't see an extra HDMI connection on my unit.

    Has anyone really done this and is there a step-by-step guide somewhere?
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  8. Member v491138's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    As an HD DVR, it also has HDMI and component outputs. Depending on your goals, there is hardware that can record from those outputs in real time at HD resolutions.

    Files cannot be copied from the hard drive of DirecTV DVRs to a computer. It is possible with older Dish Network hardware, but of course that doesn't matter here.
    Then what are the ethernet and USB connections for?
    I know I do not understand the SATA connector. eSATA yes, but not SATA.
    And BTW folks, but where is the user/owners manual? <G>
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  9. Member
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    The ethernet connection is to allow you to stream recordings to your computer from the DVR and to other Direct boxes in other rooms. As far as I can remember, the files themselves are not accessible. The eSATA is to attach another, preferably larger, hard drive. The drive attached to the eSATA becomes the default drive for the DVR.
    I have always transferred my files, by the s-vhs connection, to my dvd recorder, to archive. While it is an analog connection, the source is HD. This makes some pretty decent recordings. (Yes, you have to do it in real time, which is a PITA. I normally do it overnight, so it is not too disruptive.)
    BTW, the owners manual is really not helpful.
    Geek2330, have you tried going to the forum on the Direct site? Someone there may be able to give you some tips.
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  10. Member
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    thanks for the info PhoneMatt.

    I also checked the manual and it is a SATA port, not eSATA, and the manual says it is to connect an external hard drive and no more info.

    The Ethernet port is solely to provide internet access to the system in order to watch PPV or the Cinema.
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  11. Member v491138's Avatar
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    If that "SATA" port is for an external hard drive, then it really must be eSATA.
    No big deal unless you can move video from the internal drive to the external drive, as I have noted earlier.
    We settled the ethernet. Only for recording PPV from the internet. No access to what is already recorded.
    Sounds like the SATA connection is not going to work, but that might not be correct.
    That sounds like the USB or an analog connect is only option. What is the USB for?
    Sounds like that Haupauge PDVR card is best option. It's interesting.
    Last edited by v491138; 24th Jun 2011 at 09:29.
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  12. Member
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    The manual says that the USB 2.0 is "For future use"
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  13. Member
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    I'm telling you the best way is to use the Hauppage device in this case. You have to do it in realtime but it is less headaches.
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  14. Member v491138's Avatar
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    From what I've read here, the Haupauge PDVR adapter is the way to go.
    Thanks all.
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  15. Member
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    ok, so the question about this Haupauge PDVR is if that device has an internal hard drive or has a DVD burner.....once you plug it into your DirectTV high-def DVR using Component cables how does it record the show or movie into a DVD?
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  16. Member edDV's Avatar
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    The Hauppauge 1212 HD PVR records component HD to AVC h.264 in 1920x1080 or 1280x720p to a computer's hard drive.

    For 720x480i DVD why not just record off the analog S-Video port?


    BTW: the SATA eSATA port allows adding a larger capacity external drive for DVR recording. The drives are custom formatted (not FAT32 or NTFS) and recorded files are encrypted. There is no way to access these files from a computer and the encryption is tied to your account and that particular box. You can't move the drive to another similar DVR and read the files. They will want you to reformat.
    Last edited by edDV; 24th Jun 2011 at 14:24.
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  17. Member
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    the HD-PVR is just a capture device that plugs into the computer. Then you need to turn that capture into whatever your final destination is be it BluRay, DVD, MKV, AVI etc. I just leave them alone and play them from my WD media player.
    If I'd known I was going to live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself.
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  18. Originally Posted by geek2330 View Post
    I didn't see an extra HDMI connection on my unit.
    Right, I didn't say an extra one. You can split the HDMI output with no quality loss if you wanted to capture from it while watching on TV, with the appropriate hardware. I'm guessing HDCP is active since this is a newer box.

    If you're fine with the realtime capture method, what is your goal for storage format, how will you be playing it back, and what are your PC specs?
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  19. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    Originally Posted by geek2330 View Post
    I didn't see an extra HDMI connection on my unit.
    Right, I didn't say an extra one. You can split the HDMI output with no quality loss if you wanted to capture from it while watching on TV, with the appropriate hardware. I'm guessing HDCP is active since this is a newer box.

    If you're fine with the realtime capture method, what is your goal for storage format, how will you be playing it back, and what are your PC specs?
    Are you saying DirecTV doesn't use HDCP authentication?
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  20. Member
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    what is HDCP?
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  21. Member edDV's Avatar
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    OK this is a way newbie thread so some facts of life are needed. DirectTV has no desire to let you record from your DVR disc content, in fact they take extreme measures to prevent you from doing so. More than that, you can't imagine post 2012 proposals which cut the requirement for any analog output. This will obsolete your HDTV investment if enacted.

    Sure they could output on HDMI, Ethernet, or USB but that isn't what they want to do.

    HDCP
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-bandwidth_Digital_Content_Protection
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  22. Originally Posted by edDV View Post
    Are you saying DirecTV doesn't use HDCP authentication?
    I said "I'm guessing HDCP is active since this is a newer box." Several people in a Colossus HD PVR thread elsewhere have said that the HR20 doesn't use HDCP, but that model is several years old. The HR24 no doubt uses it. In that case, the AVerTV card is the appropriate hardware if an HDMI capture is desired. OP doesn't seem to be interested in answering any of my questions though.
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  23. Member
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    There is a way to do it, but you will have to spend some cash. I am trying to do something similar at the moment, and am in the process of acquiring the parts to do it. To do it elegantly, you need four things:

    (1) a HDMI matrix splitter, preferrably one that outputs at least 500ma current on at least one of its output ports
    (2) a HDFury (either a model 2 or 3, avoid the model 1)
    (3) a Hauppauge HD PVR (or a Hauppauge Colossus, I am going with the HD PVR)
    (4) a Laptop or computer fairly close to the set top box.

    Plug the STB into the matrix splitter. Plug one of the matrix splitter's outputs into your TV. Plug the other output into the HDFury and, if you aren't getting at least 500ma current then connect the Fury's power supply as well. Plug the Fury's component outputs into the HD PVR's component inputs. Plug the HD PVR's USB connection into the laptop. If you have any other HDMI sources you might want to capture, plug them into the matrix splitter as well.

    They you can watch what is on the STB, and capture it in HD (albeit in real time) to your heart's content.

    A cheaper slightly less elegant solution is to dispense with the splitter, and connect the HD PVR's component outputs to the TV. But then you will almost certainly need a power supply on the Fury, will have to have the Fury and HD PVR power to watch TV, and will suffer slight quality loss. You will, however, save circa $75-100 USD (?? - it's a saving of about $200 NZ Dollars).
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  24. Member
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    Originally Posted by vaporeon800 View Post
    Originally Posted by edDV View Post
    Are you saying DirecTV doesn't use HDCP authentication?
    I said "I'm guessing HDCP is active since this is a newer box." Several people in a Colossus HD PVR thread elsewhere have said that the HR20 doesn't use HDCP, but that model is several years old. The HR24 no doubt uses it. In that case, the AVerTV card is the appropriate hardware if an HDMI capture is desired. OP doesn't seem to be interested in answering any of my questions though.
    my final goal would be to have any movies recorded in the DVR then copied elsewhere (another hard drive) and then be able to burn those in DVD media as the hard drive gets full. I would then like to be able to watch those burned DVDs as needed.
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  25. Originally Posted by Chopmeister View Post
    I am trying to do something similar at the moment, and am in the process of acquiring the parts to do it. To do it elegantly, you need four things:

    (1) a HDMI matrix splitter, preferrably one that outputs at least 500ma current on at least one of its output ports
    (2) a HDFury (either a model 2 or 3, avoid the model 1)
    (3) a Hauppauge HD PVR (or a Hauppauge Colossus, I am going with the HD PVR)
    (4) a Laptop or computer fairly close to the set top box.

    Plug the STB into the matrix splitter. Plug one of the matrix splitter's outputs into your TV. Plug the other output into the HDFury and, if you aren't getting at least 500ma current then connect the Fury's power supply as well. Plug the Fury's component outputs into the HD PVR's component inputs. Plug the HD PVR's USB connection into the laptop. If you have any other HDMI sources you might want to capture, plug them into the matrix splitter as well.

    They you can watch what is on the STB, and capture it in HD (albeit in real time) to your heart's content.
    Perhaps the situation is different in NZ, but OP's box has component output already so there's no need for items 1 or 2 to use the Hauppauge box.

    Actually, I thought there were proper methods to grab DVB-S2 streams in your land. But if you drop the laptop requirement and have a fairly powerful PC, you can use the AVerTV PCIe card and an ordinary powered HDMI splitter to capture HDCP-protected content (no HDFury). I am using this setup (old drivers and free third-party software). ~$120 all-in including moderately long cables.

    Originally Posted by geek2330 View Post
    my final goal would be to have any movies recorded in the DVR then copied elsewhere (another hard drive) and then be able to burn those in DVD media as the hard drive gets full. I would then like to be able to watch those burned DVDs as needed.
    I'm going to assume you mean the standard DVD-Video format that any DVD player will play. In that case, running an S-video cable to a reasonably priced USB stick should provide fine enough SD results for you. Again, this will be realtime recording and any overlays on the screen will become part of the recorded image.
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  26. Member lacywest's Avatar
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    I use to have a Panasonic EH50 with a 100 GB harddrive in it and recorded the stuff I had on my Directv HR10-250 but the Drawer stopped working ... so I switched to the Panasonic EZ27 ... I just use the S-Video output from my Directv box. Or I record with the Digital tuner built in to the EZ27.

    I also have a Hauppauge HD-PVR and use it too ... when the PC is in the bedroom ... which it is not at the moment ... it does record in HD. I use the video component ... Red Blue Green ... video connections.
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  27. Member
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    The situation is indeed different in NZ - we have one dominant pay TV provider and their boxes output HD video over HDMI with HDCP only. They have component outputs, but for movies and premium sport etc they output SD video only - hence the need to take the HDMI output and strip the HDCP. You can indeed grab DVB-S2 streams properly, but these are in SD only - the HD feeds are pay tv and encrypted. I don't mind paying for these, and in fact I do, I just object to not being able to store them and transfer them around my network as I wish. There are HD free-to-air terrestrial transmissions, but you can't buy accredited boxes that output this signal over anything but HDMI with HDCP. Unaccredited boxes will save the files so you can access them, but the audio is HE-AAC v2, which is a pain in the backside to work with - so much so that I have given up on it.

    I didn't know about using old drivers on the AVerTV PCIe card - and have already paid for the Fury and Hauppauge HD PVR. In fact, I haven't seen the AVerTV PCIe card on sale here......
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  28. Too bad. The version sold there is more expensive, but it includes a DVB-T tuner. Oh well.

    No idea if this still works three years on, but it's what I had in mind regarding the satellite DVB feeds. Sadly the only people who know how to do this stuff tend to be the freeloaders.
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