VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 20 of 20
Thread
  1. I thinking of transferring my mini DV tapes to DVD. Not sure what I kind of system I need? Can I use my PC or is there a type of system I can purchase like the Sony DVDirect DVD Recordings? From reading the reviews Sony DvDirect system received poor ratings on the video quality, so I'm hoping PC is my option. Just not sure if it will give good quality picture?


    Is the PC the best method out there for producing excellent quality picture? Also, we are looking into purchasing a new PC and not sure what I need? I do know I will need a 1394 firewire port and an adapter card. What type of processor Intel i5 or i7, memory, graphics card, and what kind of optical drive? What excellent software do you recommend to capture, edit, and transfer?

    Finally, what formats to use? I'm very clueless in this area
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2008
    Location: Twin Peaks
    Search Comp PM
    I have laptop with a mobile processor, 3GB ram, running vista premium. I just hook my camera to it via firewire and turn the camera on and it offers to automatically import the tape. It imports as raw avi files. From that point I can use an editor such as sony movie studio to edit, or convert to a barage of formats. Just really depends on what your intentions are. I have the luxury to having a dvd recorder that can also record from camera via firewire direct to dvd.
    Quote Quote  
  3. How's the quality of the video after you transferred it to your PC or DVD?
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member MJA's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2005
    Location: IL
    Search Comp PM
    deleted
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member MJA's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2005
    Location: IL
    Search Comp PM
    you don't need a powerful PC to transfer from miniDv to PC. just a desktop/laptop with firewire,and a free program like windv .to convert to DVD there are few free ones like dvdflick or a pay-ware like ConvertXtoDvd

    no loss when you transfer to pc,but the quality will not be like the original copy when convert to DVD or any other compressed format

    whats your budget for a new pc?
    Quote Quote  
  6. Under $1,500.00 with monitor.... Is there alot loss when converted to DVD? I know I'm not going to have the best, and I hope we not talking about being really poor quality?
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member yoda313's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2004
    Location: The Animus
    Search Comp PM
    @happyfeet2 - I'm assuming this is a standard defintion mini dv camera correct?

    if it is standard definition than the loss will not be significant depending on how much you put on a disc. The more you put on a disc the lower the bitrate you need and the lower the quality will be.

    (if its high def converting to dvd will be a more dramatic change in quality - it will still look good but obviously it won't be as sharp as the high def original)

    Be warned this can be complex and aggravating at time when editing with a computer.

    If you want ease of use and just get it done than go with a settop dvd recorder. That is your quickest route with the least hassles. You just play on the tape and record onto a blank disc and your done.

    If you have never worked with digital video it can be overwhelming at first. You can learn it but you have to stick with it. If you are not up to learning then going with a settop unit is the best use of your time and money. Less customization that way but less hassles. - you can however rip the completed disc and edit on your computer aftewards if you get the desire to do so.

    Avstodvd is another great freeware program to take your captured dv video and make a dvd with it. And you would burn the disc with imgburn also free.

    And any computer from a single core on up can do standard definition capture and editing with not much hassle. Its just encoding times from dv to dvd that will benefit from a faster computer. And invest in some harddrive space also.
    Donatello - The Shredder? Michelangelo - Maybe all that hardware is for making coleslaw?
    Quote Quote  
  8. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    depends on the camera that recorded the minidv tapes. a good camera like a canon gl2 and using a good encoder and bitrate will produce nearly flawless dvds.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  9. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2008
    Location: Twin Peaks
    Search Comp PM
    The quality I get from both direct transfer to DVD, and PC are quite acceptable.
    Quote Quote  
  10. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Yes, all you need is that firewire port, a firewire cable, and you're good to go.

    To capture, you have my recommendation too for WinDV: free, simple, no installation and very effective. But it captures to DV, not MPEG-2/DvD.

    And I will highly recommend the DV format for this type of capture. DV is ~13GB/hr, but is the highest quality possible regarding this particular project. It's also fully editable with any consumer editor and can be converted to other formats easily, such as MPEG-2/DvD, if you wish.

    Regardless, you should archive the DV as Source (if not your tapes) since conversion to something like MPEG-2 will lose, at least some, quality.

    To convert (after your edits) DV-> MPEG-2->DvD, I'd personally do it in two steps for best results.

    Use a good encoder, like HC Encoder (free) for DV -> MPEG-2.

    Use a lossless author tool for MPEG-2 -> DvD. I personally use payware solutions, but DvD Flick seems to be a free favored one on this Forum (but I haven't used it myself).

    Yes, DV tapes -> DV conversion is not that CPU intensive. DV -> MPEG-2 can be, depending.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
    Quote Quote  
  11. Member MJA's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2005
    Location: IL
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Happyfeet2 View Post
    Under $1,500.00 with monitor.... Is there alot loss when converted to DVD? I know I'm not going to have the best, and I hope we not talking about being really poor quality?
    that's a lot of money for a PC.what are u going to use it for?


    few quick deals search

    http://www.techbargains.com/news_displayItem.cfm/245733
    Quote Quote  
  12. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
    Search Comp PM
    If one wants to purchase a modern hexa-core beast for H.264 HD encoding, or any of a number of other reasons, then so be it, but yeah, it's not necessary for this project.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
    Quote Quote  
  13. Member Verify's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    There are several ways to get from mini DV tapes to DVD depending on the amount of time and money you want to spend and the quality of the final DVD.

    1. Use a professional service (http://www.digitalfaq.com/services/video-conversion-tape-to-dvd.htm)
    Some Pluses: lowest cost for just a few tapes, you don’t need to know anything, and you will get the best possible quality
    Some Minuses: gets expensive for multiple tapes, unless you send a back-up of the tape the original could be lost in the mail, and you won’t get completely custom menus and editing.

    2. Use a computer (lots of information on this site)
    Some Pluses: complete control of the whole process, a learning experience, and can be very satisfying experience.
    Some Minuses: BIG learning curve, very time consuming, and can be really frustrating.

    3. Use a dedicated DVD recorder (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=12244086#post12244086)
    Some Pluses: little to learn, relative simple to do, and doesn’t require much time.
    Some Minuses: no special effects, very simple editing and menus, and OK quality.

    As mentioned in the previous posts, the above mostly addresses standard definition DV; if you have Hi-def tapes, then everything gets more ‘interesting.’

    Consider the complete process in going from tape to DVD using a computer:

    1. Capture: getting the DV information from the tape to a file on the computer (most a firewire port and WinDV).

    2. Editing the DV file: lots of software possibilities from free to expensive (this site has lots of recommendation and information).

    3. Converting the edited file from DV format to MPEG-2 : requires an encoder ( most editors include one; some are better than others).

    4. Authoring: creating titles, menus, adding special effects (fades, wipes, etc.)

    5. Burning: writing the edited video and authored information to the DVD (most use ImgBurn ).

    Some recommend an ‘all-in-one’ program (for example VideoStudio) others using individual program optimized for each step in the process to give more complete control and to allow lots of processing (noise removal, de-blocking, etc. – a whole study in its self).

    So, again as mentioned in previous posts, first determine which format you have (standard or hi-def) then decide on how much time and money you want to spend, and then make a choice.

    P.S. (to the pros) I’m NOT an expert in this area but have been reading this site a lot and playing around a bit, so I think that the above information is reasonable correct, but if not please let the OP and I know!
    Last edited by Verify; 8th Mar 2011 at 13:18. Reason: Fix font
    Andrew Jackson: "It's a poor mind that can only think of one way to spell a word."
    Quote Quote  
  14. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Verify
    Use a computer (lots of information on this site)
    Some Pluses: complete control of the whole process, a learning experience, and can be very satisfying experience.
    Some Minuses: BIG learning curve, very time consuming, and can be really frustrating.
    This I can relate to my VHS->Digital experience too. Lots to learn, lots of redoing along the way - capturing, editing, encoding, etc. Despite this, and even though I abhor VHS in general, I'm very much enjoying the process now - especially with the excellent results I'm now getting.

    Originally Posted by Verify
    P.S. (to the pros) Iím NOT an expert in this area but have been reading this site a lot and playing around a bit, so I think that the above information is reasonable correct, but if not please let the OP and I know!
    I'm not a Mod or a Pro, but I've been around here long enough to have the opinion that your information is rather accurate and well-summarized. Well done.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
    Quote Quote  
  15. Thanks for the info! I looked at my tapes and they are the standard definition, which I believe is good? I will only be burning about 15 to 30 minutes of tape on a DVD. As far as editing software, what do you recommend? Cyberlink Powerdirector 9 deluxe received good reviews or do I stick with Adobe Creative Suite 5? Looking for software that is easy, fun, and does a great job at editing!

    I guess it is the capturing that is confusing to me, and I will need to read more on this. Thanks for listing the complete process in going from tape to DVD using a computer. I think I really would like to use the computer - it will be my hobby. I would like to add titles and effects! How different if I was using the high definition tapes? Easier process? By the way I have a Sony DCR-HC48 camcorder - I don't think it takes high definition tapes?

    Again thanks for the responses.

    Quote Quote  
  16. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2008
    Location: Twin Peaks
    Search Comp PM
    You might look at Sony Movie Studio for editing it's a nice linear editor for the price, that, and Adobe Premier Elements have great functionality. By Adobe Creative Suite 5 are you refering to the production premium suite? I just bought that for my new PC it's expensive, but has great stuff and a learning curve.
    Quote Quote  
  17. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
    Search Comp PM
    The capturing isn't that hard. If you have your firewire port and cable ready it's real easy with WinDV. Just leave your computer alone during the process to be safe.

    For editing software it doesn't really matter with DV so much. Any good consumer editor worth its salt can import, cut, join, add effects, etc and export the result with a form of "smart render" (where applicable) easily for DV.

    Unfortunately, I do not know of a good editor that is free, but many are not expensive, and have free trials. Look into products from Sony, Adobe, VideoStudio, Cyberlink, ... , there's enough good choices.

    For the "fun factor", this is something you have to feel for yourself. And yes, this is rather important since you may spend some time with this.

    Yes, storing 20 min/DvD-R, as data, does sound correct to archive DV sized video. You can still make regular DvDs out of this if you want to share with friends, etc, but you should keep the DV as your Source. (For backup, make copies of your DV data discs or keep your tapes, or both).

    Also, I doubt your Sony is HD.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
    Quote Quote  
  18. Two quick questions - when do I convert over to MPEG 2 format? After the editing is done? From what I read - MPEG 2 format is the best format?

    Thanks!
    Quote Quote  
  19. Member yoda313's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2004
    Location: The Animus
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Happyfeet2 View Post
    Two quick questions - when do I convert over to MPEG 2 format? After the editing is done? From what I read - MPEG 2 format is the best format?

    Thanks!
    Yes convert after editing.

    There is no "best format". There is just what is most ideal for a given situation.

    For creating dvd it HAS to be in mpeg2 in order to be authored properly.
    Donatello - The Shredder? Michelangelo - Maybe all that hardware is for making coleslaw?
    Quote Quote  
  20. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Happyfeet2
    ...when do I convert over to MPEG 2 format? After the editing is done?
    Yes I agree with Yoda that it's always best, especially with DV, to edit before converting to more compressed formats (like MPEG-2).

    However, all is not lost if you didn't. Today, MPEG editing is very good, but you'd need a separate, and dedicated, MPEG editor for good results, such as Womble, VideoReDo or TMPGEnc MPEG Editor. You can still edit MPEG with those DV editors mentioned, but they will likely re-encode the whole result with MPEG, killing time/quality. Just make sure you use the right tool with each format.

    Originally Posted by Happyfeet2
    From what I read - MPEG 2 format is the best format?
    MPEG-2 is not the best format for capturing DV tapes. It's much smaller in file size but quality will visibly suffer. (However, if capturing VHS then MPEG-2 starts to show some advantages over DV, but not for DV Tapes).

    And yeah, as Yoda says, you've got no choice if you want DvD. You will need MPEG-2 for this regardless.

    But capture in DV for best quality to archive, and encode with a good MPEG-2 encoder from that Source afterwards for DV->MPEG-2/DvD.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads