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  1. I have a JVC DR-MV100B DVD/VCR combo recorder, and the DVD drive refuses to keep closed. I tried putting NO disc in the drive, but it does NOT help. I eventually unplugged it, and that also did nothing. i even pushed it in with my hand, and it just pops right back out. Unfortunately, the 1 yr warranty on it is over, as i bought it in 2008. What's wrong with it? And is it fixable? Some help would be great.

    Thanks in advance.
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2008
    Location: Australia
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    Can you hear a slipping drive belt? When the tray closes, can you see the disc clamp coming down? Can you see the tray trying to contact a limit switch near its end of travel?
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  3. Unplug it for a minute. Always do this with any appliance as it resets it.

    What if you close it & then turn the power off does it stay closed?
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  4. Member orsetto's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2007
    Location: NYC
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    Its probably not fixable at a cost that would make repair worthwhile. A stuck-open tray is usually traceable to either laser failure or a worn belt/gear/clamp as fzabkar suggested. If its a failing laser, you would also see an alert on your TV screen along the lines of "cannot read this disc" (even with no disc loaded). If there is no unusual display, and the tray simply refuses to stay closed, its a mechanical problem in the tray. Something is preventing the tray from telling the recorder it is closed properly, so it reopens immediately assuming you will re-seat the disc or whatever. Most recorder burners these days are not user repairable or replaceable, and the cost at a factory service center is usually $200 or more. You could ask around for a reputable independent service tech: sometimes these guys are able to disassemble a burner and fix minor problems for under $100, but a burner thats already failed once could easily fail again a short time later: its a risk.

    The DRMV100 was the first "not really a JVC" model sold by JVC, its actually an LG with a JVC badge on it. The LG recorders have a poor durability history, the two years use you've had from it are typical, so repair is not really cost effective. None of the other available DVD/VHS combo decks are any better than your JVC, the ones with ATSC digital tuners all have major issues due to the VHS/DVD/timer interface. If you can live without the VHS part, consider replacing your defective recorder with the Magnavox H2160A, the best recorder still on the USA market and recently price reduced to $198 at Wal*Mart's web store. This unit has a very reliable ATSC tuner/timer, a reliable chassis, and user-replaceable burners that cost about $70 direct from mfr (although they are not known to fail). Instead of VHS, the 2160 includes a 160gb hard drive which can record up to 60 hours without having to burn or erase a DVD at all, you only burn a DVD when you want to quickly copy a recording from the HDD to keep for your library. You can connect any VCR to it to make tape copies. Or, for $269 you can Amazon pre-order the latest Magnavox MDR513H, which is the same recorder with a twice larger HDD (120 hour capacity). It will be available the end of this month.
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  5. What's "slipping drive belt", and how does it sound? When it closes, it closes, and i can NOT see anything, unless i open it, i will try that, later. What's "limit switch near the end of it's travel?? When i close it, and turn it off, it does stay closed. I noticed that when i unplug the power to it, and plug it back in, the front display, is blank, it should say "Hello" But when i turn it off and on again, the "hello" display shows up, but the drive still will NOT close, of course.

    When i disconnected the component cables from the back, and plugged ONLY the power cord, it started to work again. However, once i connected the component cables, and turned it on, it was back the same as before, i still have NO clue what's wrong with it, could the eject button be broken somehow? I will open it soon to see if a foreign object or something is in or around the drive, although i really doubt that....In the meantime, are the Magnavox DVD/VCR combo recorders, a good buy? Will they last more than 2 years?
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  6. Sounds like the problem is with the connectors at the back. Were you doing anything with those cables before it started acting up? Try not pushing the component cable all the way in, does that help? Are those connectors moving? There should be some screws in between all the connectors to anchor them. You could re-solder the connectors to the circuit board.
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  7. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: Want my advice? PM me.
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    Combo DVD/VCR units are never a good buy.
    The units commonly fail, regardless of brand. Avoid, avoid, avoid.
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  8. Member orsetto's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2007
    Location: NYC
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    You usually cannot see parts like the tray belt or limit switch simply by opening the lid of the recorder. When you open the top, what does the DVD drive look like? Can you see the tray itself with the gears and the moving disc clamp, when you load a DVD can you see the dvd in the closed tray? If so, it might be possible to service cheaply if you find an independent technician. But I'm pretty sure the DRMV100 uses a burner enclosed in its own sealed case, these generally need to be replaced as an entire module at a ridiculous cost.

    The tray belt (if it has one) is the diameter of a penny and usually hidden in the bowels of the tray mechanics, not easy to replace. The limit switch is a tiny metal spring, which is flattened by the back of the tray once it is closed all the way, or by the disc clamp as it locks down, this tells the recorder all is well with the tray. All it takes is one little mechanical screwup, and these interlocks fail: the tray belt affects the full closing, which stalls the disc clamp by a hair, which doesn't press the limit switch, which informs the recorder the tray is not closed right. The end, throw the recorder in the trash.

    HOWEVER: you have provided new information in your last post indicating this is more likely to be an overall electrical problem in the recorder. If the tray opens and closes normally with only the power cord attached, but starts hanging as soon as you plug in the component cables, then there is a short circuit or loose solder joints in the back panel. Either the weight of the component cables pulls on the panel creating a short, or the cables themselves create a confusing circuit causing the recorder to malfunction. A messed-up back panel board is a lost cause, if the recorder is out of warranty throw it away unless you can find a tech who can repair it cheaply (under $100). You could try using a different set of component cables: there's a small chance the cables themselves may be the problem, and the tray issue will stop if you use different cables. Don't overlook the television either: its component inputs might have an issue sending a faulty signal back into the recorder. Try the tray with the component cables disconnected from the TV.

    The Magnavox DVD/VHS combos are more-or-less identical to the Toshiba combos, neither is very good. That factory puts more effort into its flagship DVD/HDD recorders like the Mag H2160, their DVD/VHS models are built as disposable fodder for superstore weekend sale promotions. Thats not to say you couldn't buy one and have it work for you for a year or so, but they just aren't reliable or good. How important is a tuner to you? Do you get your TV from a cable box or satellite box? If so, consider the tuner-less Panasonic DMR-EA38, which is the only truly rugged, reasonably decent DVD/VHS combo available in North America. You connect your cable/satellite decoder line outs to its line inputs, using the box as the tuner. Unfortunately the DRM-EA38 is hard to find and costs $229 minimum, not a good value compared to the far more versatile Magnavox H2160 with hard disk.

    DVD/VHS combos are like hybrid automobiles: they seem like a good idea if you don't get stung by the hidden flaws. They work for some people but screw others terribly, individual units vary wildly in quality and performance, and repairs are an expensive joke.
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  9. No, i disconnected the component cables from back of the TV, that did NOT change a thing. At least, now i know the TV is fine. Next, i'll switch sides on the component cables, and see if that helps, otherwise i'll try to get a new set of comp cables, though i doubt that'll do much. Still have NOT had time to open it up, i may be able to do that tomorrow....

    I have cable TV, and, AFAIK, it does NOT require a box. I also get satellite, and that DOES use a box, so i reckon i still need a tuner, right? Don't i need a tuner to record from cable, box or no box? I really just need to put some camcorder tapes onto a DVD, can i do that with my PC?
    Last edited by seskanda; 7th Jul 2010 at 03:37.
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  10. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    did you try kicking it?
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  11. Member orsetto's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2007
    Location: NYC
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    Cable is going thru a major transition all across the USA at present. Most regions have done away with "no box" cable, I'm surprised you haven't been forced to accept a "free" decoder box yet. A tunerless recorder like the Panasonic DMR-EA38 cannot record from a bare cable wire: you would need to request the (probably free) basic box. Your satellite box would connect via line outputs, as it probably does now with your existing recorder.

    If all you need to do are some camcorder tapes, you can use your PC assuming it came with video inputs. If it did not, you would have to shop for a video encoding board or a USB video box, either of which can cost as much or more than a cheap DVD/VHS combo recorder (and open a whole new can of technical worms you may not want to deal with). Just go to Wal*Mart and buy whatever Magnavox DVD/VHS they have on sale for $99-$119. It won't be wonderful but should hold up at least long enough to copy a couple dozen camcorder tapes. After that all bets are off, it may be a good recorder for TV or it may not. Choose a model with a tuner if you plan to continue recording from your "boxless" cable service, if not a tunerless version will be MUCH more reliable (of two identical models, the one with the tuner will be the biggest pain in the a**).
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  12. Most all units have a trim attached to the DVD drive tray On some models the closing of the tray can be governed by an adjustment
    On other unit’s the trim may be fixed and ANY Slight obstruction to the tray closing will cause it to immediately open
    On some I had to open the unit and push the drive as far forward as possible.

    The drive could very well be defective But this can be an easy fix that is worth a try
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