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  1. Member dzsoul's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Philippines
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    I have Samsung LCD TV 32" fullHD(1080p) series5 and the problem is, it would never turn on no matter how i click the power button on the remote or even on the TV.

    of course, the TV is plugged (im not that stupid) and the red light is on.

    well actually, this has happened a month ago. I tried turning on the TV when it only blinked or showed the screen less than a second and turned off. then after that, it won't turn on anymore....so,

    all i did was trying to turn it on again and again, also using the dvd player (coz when you turn on the dvd player the tv also turns on normally). tried several times to turn on the dvd player but it is the only one that would turn on, i could even play a DVD with all the sounds on the menu but the TV won't turn on, until, i took a while, the DVD player turn on ALONG with the TV.

    recently, it happened again. but again, i did the same thing. trying to turn on the TV with the power button, then repeatedly turning on the dvd player, hoping the TV will also turn on. then it worked again.


    What could be causing this and how can i fix this?
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: United Kingdom
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    Couple of thing to try
    1. Disconnect the DVD player from the TV and see if the TV switches on and off OK - The DVD player might be overriding the TV's normal control.
    2. Check that HDMI control is set to "off" for both the TV and DVD player. The TV will no longer switch on automatically when the DVD player is turned on, but that might be what's causing your problem.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2009
    Location: United States
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    Apparently, certain Samsung LCD models have been experiencing a turn on problem due to faulty capacitors on the power supply board. See this thread http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=847465&page=629 or this link
    http://www.crovean.net/samsung-lcd-tv-power-up-problem for info related to this problem.
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  4. Member MOVIEGEEK's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2002
    Location: CA,USA
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    Samsungs are notorious for faulty power supply boards, especially if it was made from 2005-2008.
    If you are knowledgeable in electronics you could replace the capacitors yourself:
    http://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=62360
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  5. Member dzsoul's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Philippines
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    actually i have no idea on replacing capacitors...

    but what is the cause of having these capacitors to go bad, aside from being faulty in the first place? was it caused by overuse/overheat?

    i am still under warranty can i make samsung replace it for me?
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  6. Member edDV's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Northern California, USA
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    Originally Posted by dzsoul
    actually i have no idea on replacing capacitors...

    but what is the cause of having these capacitors to go bad, aside from being faulty in the first place? was it caused by overuse/overheat?

    i am still under warranty can i make samsung replace it for me?
    Yes you can. Call them about the nearest repair center. Get it fixed while it is still in warranty.
    Recommends: Kiva.org - Loans that change lives.
    http://www.kiva.org/about
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  7. Always Watching guns1inger's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2004
    Location: Miskatonic U
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    One of the issues with leaving a device in standby mode is that capacitors can dry out. While you still have power to them, they are OK. But if you lose power, they won't charge up properly, and therefore your device won't turn on.
    Read my blog here.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Jan 2010
    Location: Canada
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    Hi, just joined and saying hi to all, background is I repair TVs for a living at TV shop and see all kinds of brands.

    Samsung and other top brands engineered the SMPSes rather well that cooling by air convection kept hot spots to a absolute miniumum and components are widely spaced apart for the same reason. It is simply *certain kind of* bad capacitors used. Not standby cooking, also affected "bad" capacitors for other run voltage supplies. Again, caps on these good SMPSes were not baked at all.

    Just go ahead and get capacitors replaced with quality capacitors. Be cautious with repair shops, they don't use proper capacitors. For this reason I specified low esr 105C with long life caps, I had to special order from *different supplier* outside of our usual supplier. My co-worker attempted to use what they got from our supplier and only lasted 3 months on a general purpose capacitors. Our supplier cared less despite repeated messages sent there.

    Other makers especially generic LCD TVs used smaller SMPS that is more packed tightly and using poor caps. Supposed to use UCC, Rubycons, Samxon (certain series line has to be specified) and Panasonic are *preferred*, anything else capacitors will not last long. And equally worse, some SMPS in these generic TVs is poorly engineered that they sometimes dies final death if key capacitor decayed to critical point. Better SMPSes ones self-protect till repair is preformed to restore SMPS function with new quality caps.

    Cheers, Wizard
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2010
    Location: Pensacola, FL
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    Originally Posted by dzsoul View Post
    I have Samsung LCD TV 32" fullHD(1080p) series5 and the problem is, it would never turn on no matter how i click the power button on the remote or even on the TV.

    of course, the TV is plugged (im not that stupid) and the red light is on.

    well actually, this has happened a month ago. I tried turning on the TV when it only blinked or showed the screen less than a second and turned off. then after that, it won't turn on anymore....so,

    all i did was trying to turn it on again and again, also using the dvd player (coz when you turn on the dvd player the tv also turns on normally). tried several times to turn on the dvd player but it is the only one that would turn on, i could even play a DVD with all the sounds on the menu but the TV won't turn on, until, i took a while, the DVD player turn on ALONG with the TV.

    recently, it happened again. but again, i did the same thing. trying to turn on the TV with the power button, then repeatedly turning on the dvd player, hoping the TV will also turn on. then it worked again.


    What could be causing this and how can i fix this?
    I had the same problem with my Samsung 26" LCD and a friend of mine had a similar issue with his 40" LCD. I did a little research and found that it was likely an electrolytic capacitor. When I took the back off of the TV I could see the blown capacitor. It was $1.40 to fix.

    I recorded how I fixed it, although I've never done a tutorial before so bare with me. It might be able to help ya out.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWKlex7kA7A
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  10. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2010
    Location: Toronto, Canada
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    I had the same problem. Called Samsung customer service and had a TV repair person at my house the same night to fix it totally free of charge and two years after warranty expired.
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  11. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2011
    Location: california
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    OK. This is what the problem is. I have the exact same tv and have experienced the exact same problem with mine. As a matter of fact, i am going through it for the second time as i write this now. About a year ago, our tv did the same thing. I called samsung, and explained what the tv was doing. At that point they advised me that it was no longer under warranty. However, For this issue i was entitled to a one time free repair. I'm now realizing that they have obviously been having problems with this particular tv. So they had me call their repair office (it was a sub-contractor pro-tronic i beleive the name is) and set up a time to come to my house. The guy showed up on time and was very quick about making the repair. You should know that the problem with our tv was a blown capacitor on an 8 by 8 inch circit board that i did see for myself. He all ready had the replacement board in his tool pouch when he came to the door. It took about 15 mins start to finish to replace. Worked great For about 2 months! WTF? Same crap. Won't come on. I was P#ssed off! I called again just today, and this time i have to pay for it. I won't know how much until i talk to the repairman when he calls. But believe this. I WILL be expecting at least a year warranty for the repair. Because who's to say this won't happen again in another month? You should do the same especially for the parts cost. Because they obviously used crappy parts to do my repair. Here is their number to call. 1-800-samsung. Make sure you have the model # and serial # when you call. Good luck to you.
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  12. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2011
    Location: california
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    Wow! I just watched a girl on youtube fix the exact same problem by replacing the capacitor herself!!! I'm going to radio shack right now to get the part for $1.40. Here is the link for her video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWKlex7kA7A
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  13. Samsung Series 3/330 HD LCD TV 32 ON/OFF remote and TV switch problem

    When our TV would not turn on, even if plugged in just by itself, I went online.

    In my search to see what was the matter, I found this Forum.

    I was stunned of so many customers with the exact same problem without proper Samsung response. It was reported by many that the issue was ‘the blown Capacitors’.

    I called Samsung and they read me their generic statement which basically said that the Company was not responsible and that my tv problem was attributed to the ‘normal wear and tear’. The best I was offered was a $120 repair, I would also have to pay for the one way shipment cost. I said I would consider their offer.

    Before closing, I requested to leave a complaint and specifically asked if I may do so. I was reassured that I could and that my complaint would be taken down by the same person.

    In the complaint I enumerated several points: I do not recall the order exactly, but in it I tried to address these specific points. I mentioned that I considered it disrespectful on the part of the company to ‘insult my intelligence’ with their broad-sweeping statement that it was not their fault, in light of so many internet complaint about the exact same ON/OFF problems with the same new tv’s. I mentioned that there were clearly many customers (I estimate in the 100’s). I mentioned that charging anything to repair this problem is unjust and irresponsible. Or, sweeping everyone with the same generic statement, in light of the fact that my 3y.o. tv just sat in the tv room and was not often watched. And that I’m displeased with the overall company performance in the field. That if they believed that these breakdowns in the relatively new tv’s were all attributed to the ‘normal wear and tear’ they must have a really low level of confidence in their product.

    Afterwards, I asked if my complaint was recorded and if it will be transferred to the appropriate chain of command, and was reassured that it was in fact so. Leaving the phone, I realized that the ‘prepared’ generic ‘no-fault’ company statement, meant that Samsung was in fact keenly aware of the ON/OFF issue with their tv’s, but refused to take the responsibility for their faulty wiring.

    Minutes later, I decided to call back the same customer relations number. I wanted to update the complaint letter by adding that if I did not hear of Samsung taking their responsibility within several days I would strongly consider sending a memo to the US Dep. of Consumer Affairs. Additionally, I wanted to have my former complaint read to me, to see how it sounded and to ask for an update on its status.

    In response I was read something to the effect: ‘The customer refuses to pay $120’.

    I asked if that was all that was noted in my complaint and was told, Yes. Upon which time I said that that was not my complaint, in response, I was ‘escalated’ to the higher authority. Upon which time I was apologized to and was able to ‘rerecord’ my complaint. I was then asked if I wished to call back to hear back my complaint, but I had no stomach to play their game any further. I asked that Samsung simply do what was responsible and either replace my TV or not charge for repairs, the only two options I would consider Just on their part. I was told that I would be reached within 24 hours.

    I was reached by Samsung's Executive Customer Relations division. I was politely informed that Samsung will neither replace the tv or repair it without charge.

    To date I’ve received no written apology from Samsung Corporation for lying to me in the first place.

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  14. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2011
    Location: california
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    Did you consider fixing it yourself. It really was an easy fix. Or at least diagnose the problem by inspecting the capacitors.
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  15. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2011
    Location: california
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    Here was the link to fix it yourself. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWKlex7kA7A
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  16. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2003
    Location: USA
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    The TV set went bad again because he replaced it with a board with the exact same capacitors that went bad originally. Visit http://www.badcaps.net/ to learn how to replace it again. You don't want to use GP capacitors from somewhere like Radio Shack they won't last.

    They will be able to help you get the proper parts for a permanent fix. God chance that a search of the site will find other messages about the same model Samsung. There are tutorials and tips on how to change the bad capacitors.
    If I'd known I was going to live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself.
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  17. Member turk690's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2003
    Location: ON, Canada
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    On separate threads elsewhere in this forum, I have commented about capacitor issues. Dead electrolytic capacitors are not unique to Samsung, or even to LCD TVs. Anyone who has any electronics with these in it (namely, ALL types of electronic equipment) will have to contend with them eventually becoming defective, and by association, how you square with the complexities of repair, if it goes there. That electrolytic capacitors are doomed to a grotesque, leaky, smelly death from the moment they are powered on doesn't hurt Samsung or its ilk: replacing them is a potential revenue stream, in terms of the arm-and-leg prices you have to fork over to the repair personalities (like me ), or eventually giving up and purchasing a new LCD TV altogether.
    One thing I found out: this is a wholly professional field. I have gone out of my way to show to people with even an iota of technical balls how to pinpoint out these evil electrolytic capacitors and how to replace them, probably like how the mentioned tutorials on YouTube and elsewhere purport to. But I'm very rarely successful, which makes me question how effective likewise those tutorial videos are. Just as not everyone can fold an origami duck or fly an ultra-light, not everyone can wield a Weller on one hand and a 97-3 lead-free solder on the other to tackle these evil capacitors that have caused him to miss House for the umpteenth time.
    One way of looking at this is like this: what you don't know won't hurt you. Imagine this: lots of critical things you do every day involves electronics--the controller of that elevator you rode to your 13th floor office, same with your subway train, or the cash you withdrew from the ATM, the PSUs of the blade servers that run Google... In every single one of them, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of frail, unpredictable, boiling hot, potentially close to dying electrolytic capacitors all lined up in a row, the Weakest Link in the Chain. Makes the Samsung LCD teevee case quite banal in comparison, don't you think? No less important, at least from samsung customer's POV, but so there...
    Stop feeling suicidal just because he unfriended you on fezbuk.
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  18. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2003
    Location: USA
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    The way I look at it is that Samsung saved a few pennies by using lower quality electrolytic capacitors. Isn't it just amazing how the bulging failed capacitors are almost always the cheap brand or the cheap line from a brand name manufacturer.

    The truth is that unfortunately if you put out two otherwise identical models and one was $20 more and stated that all critical parts were long life most people would buy the cheaper one anyway.

    All it would take is for the power supply makers to switch over to using Polymer capacitors that almost never fail instead of Electrolytic capacitors, much like the better motherboard makers have done.

    Example: Dell SX280s had all electrolytic capacitors until they started to fail prematurely. They replaced those with Polymers in the areas prone to failure. Problem solved. They saved a few pennies at manufacture time and paid for it in Warranty costs and disgruntled customers.

    Isn't amazing how the older Pentium 2, & 3 motherboards never had capacitor issues. Oh wait they were actually built to last.
    If I'd known I was going to live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself.
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  19. Member turk690's Avatar
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    Location: ON, Canada
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    Originally Posted by TBoneit View Post
    Isn't amazing how the older Pentium 2, & 3 motherboards never had capacitor issues. Oh wait they were actually built to last.
    Older Pentium MOBOs were not immune to these capacitor issues. But it was less mainly because the conditions in there were probably not as hot. In my experience the worst were Pentium D MOBOs were the processor heatsinks were so hot I couldn't touch them while the PC was on, and with only 50% of CPU activity at that. I convinced some people with Pentium desktops to replace them with Core2Duo when these came out; I suppose with hardly any capacitor replacements done Intel is telling the truth that Core2Duos were way cooler...
    Stop feeling suicidal just because he unfriended you on fezbuk.
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  20. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2011
    Location: Chicago,IL
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    My Samsung 32" LN32A3300JID purchased in June 2008 developed this problem this week - worked fine Sunday, wouldn't turn on Wednesday. The power button on the bottom middle has a red light, but nothing happens either using the button or remote. Not under warranty, but I've reviewed this forum and repair videos on uTube, and I'm grateful for information on what to look for to fix it - first TV I've ever had that has broken! My husband does electrical work, so as soon as we get the TV off its mount to find the exact capacitor type, we'll give it a try. Thanks to all - thought I was going to have to pitch my newest TV!
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  21. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
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    nlb55 - If we helped you, there's no need to add to the thread just to say thanks. If everybody did that some of the threads would start stretching into hundreds of posts.
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  22. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2003
    Location: USA
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    Just read reply #16 from me. Do not get the capacitors from Radio shack for example. They will be General purpose capacitors and most likely be rated at 85% Centigrade and not at 105%. People have used them and they worked, for how long is the question. Why go through all that work just to do it again.

    One other thing some have done is order the exact same model board that has the defective capacitors on it from Ebay for example and then fix theirs at their leisure as a spare. Depends on the price of the replacement board of course. Others did not want to buy all the equipment nor wait for a replacement board to ship and had it done locally. Where I am, Local computer repair, we do Monitor repairs and Motherboards for bad capacitors. I would charge $49 if you brought it in and $99 if we had to remove and re-install computer boards and computer monitors. TV board repairs you would have to bring in the board.

    When handling the electronics parts of the TV be careful you don't build up static electricity and damage something that way.
    If I'd known I was going to live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself.
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  23. Long back we had similar issue with our old (discarded) TV. TV would not turn -on even if the power cord is plugged. So, I called my sweet-n-sour heart (and stupid sometimes too!, sometimes?, i doubt!) to get some idea. The idea finally i got was why don't you put your two fingers in power-outlet socket and really feel if, is there any power or not?. I asked honey you first. But we both could not dare.

    Finally, I called my friend - a TV Tech (pro) who figured-out particular power regulator gate/switch chip in power-supply section is internally fused and does not turn-on other circuitry. He got the parts and fixed it.
    Last edited by Bonie81; 26th Nov 2011 at 10:10.
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  24. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2007
    Location: United States
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    hi guys - I have a Samsung Plasma 42" - PN42B450 and had a similar problem with no power but blinking red light. This issue sadly was probably was my own fault as I was working the power cables and inadvertently turned off the power strip and then turned it on and off a couple times as I was fumbling about. The other devices to the power strip, such as the cable box and bluray player, did turn on but not the Samsung

    I opened up the back, after reading numerous internet complaints, to check the capacitors and they were all fine. No "bumps" , no blown caps, no oozing liquid. People complain that the blinking red light is accompanied by ticking or clicking noises, but mine is silent.

    so what could it be?? There are 2 small fuses on the powerboard but they look ok, although they are not transparent so cant see inside. I am befuddled!
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  25. Member
    Join Date: Mar 2008
    Location: United States
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    Have you tried actually unplugging the TV from the electricity completely, leave it like that for 30 minutes
    and plugging it back in?
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  26. Member
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    Location: United States
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    hi dave - yes, I read that unplugging may help so I unplugged overnight and plugged back in but no luck.

    Reply # 23 indicates a type of power internal fuse or something.. maybe that is it?? 90% of replies (been googling for a couple of days now) on the internet indicate bad capacitor but mine look ok
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  27. Member
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    Usually there is a code in the blknking. For example, it blinks 5 times, then a pause and the pattern repeats.
    Is there a pattern?
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  28. Member
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    the red blinking is continuous at almost precisely 1 second intervals
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  29. Member MOVIEGEEK's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by texas1 View Post
    Reply # 23 indicates a type of power internal fuse or something.. maybe that is it?? 90% of replies (been googling for a couple of days now) on the internet indicate bad capacitor but mine look ok
    You can't always tell when an electrolytic capacitor goes bad, you could pull each one and test it but it's best to take it to a Samsung repair shop.
    I can't believe there wasn't a class action lawsuit seeing how many Samsung owners have had problems.

    BTW: www.partsexpress.com sells quality capacitors.
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  30. Hi all,
    As many of you, I started having issues with my Samsung LCD 40".

    The TV set has been working fine for the past 2 years, but since I came back from abroad after 15 days off, I am able to turn it on sporadically only.

    Upon pressing the on/off switch, the TV makes the clicking noise and the intro song, the screen kinda turns on (but is still black) and no image appears. The on/off led then starts blinking and sound works fine. http://youtu.be/mtYxzxAXroE

    I tried to open the TV set to check for popped resistors but apparently everything is fine, which seems to rule out a power supply issue.

    If you guys have any ideas I would really appreciate.

    Cheers
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