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  1. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2009
    Location: France
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    I've written this to help my fellow video-makers to make their purchases :






    Chart PDF file :
    pro%20video%20softwares%20comparative%20board.pdf
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jan 2007
    Location: Republic of Texas
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    Neither Premiere CS4 nor Vegas Pro require an Intermediate codec for HDV, unless you have a system that does not meet the minimum requirements for the software to run HD.

    Those are 2 misleading bits of info I already saw from glancing at your chart.
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  3. Member edDV's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Northern California, USA
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    Yes, for Vegas Pro HDV needs an asterisk. It can be native edited or assisted with an intermediate codec. Same with AVCHD and XDCAM. Vegas Pro also allows use of proxy formats for AVCHD, HDV or XDCAM which is useful for offline editing.

    Looks good. Thank you.
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2009
    Location: France
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    I've modified my chart in order to make it as accurate as possible. Let me know if anything is wrong. I'll correct if necessary. Thanks !
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  5. Member
    Join Date: Jan 2007
    Location: Republic of Texas
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    You've put in a lot of effort, and it actually looks pretty good. Maybe this could end up as a sticky.

    I might suggest on the Intermediate codec comments: instead of "if you want," maybe you could say, "for slower CPUs," or something to that effect.

    All-in-all, it should be very helpful for those who get overwhelmed with the HD editing software choices. (I recall from past threads, you've had to deal with your own HD headaches, especially with Premiere.)

    Many thanks.
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  6. Member edDV's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Northern California, USA
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    I'm not sure if all these programs edit HDV, XDCAM, AVCHD, AVC-Intra natively (for example FCP). Some additional research would discover which programs require an intermediate codec and which natively edit the format. In most cases today, the intermediate codec will perform better but as processors improve, native editing becomes more practical.
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  7. Member fitch.j's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2009
    Location: United Kingdom
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    Intermediates for HDV should be listed as unnecessary.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2009
    Location: France
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    Originally Posted by filmboss80
    You've put in a lot of effort, and it actually looks pretty good. Maybe this could end up as a sticky.
    Have I to say that I do strongly agree with your idea ?

    Originally Posted by filmboss80
    I might suggest on the Intermediate codec comments: instead of "if you want," maybe you could say, "for slower CPUs," or something to that effect.
    Some people do not use such codecs because of slow CPUs but because editing with i-frame codecs help to preserve video quality when it is issued from long GOP formats.


    Originally Posted by edDV
    I'm not sure if all these programs edit HDV, XDCAM, AVCHD, AVC-Intra natively (for example FCP)
    Regarding AVC-intra, FCP is indeed speaking of Native AVC-Intra playback for both AVC-Intra 100 and AVC-Intra 50 ( http://www.apple.com/fr/finalcutstudio/specs/#finalcutpro ).

    Could anybody explain what is native codec playback ?

    As long as I do not know what it is, I add a "?" to my "yes" regarding Native import/export and to my "unnecessary" regarding the need for an intermediate codec.


    Originally Posted by Fitch.j
    Intermediates for HDV should be listed as unnecessary.
    Because HDV is a long GOP (Group of pictures) codec it may necessitate an intermediate i-frame codec in order to preserve quality either to relieve processor.
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  9. Member budwzr's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2007
    Location: City Of Angels
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    Vegas 9 has its own intermediary codec, .mxf. It's basically mpeg2 with Sony markers embedded. No need to buy Cineform.
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  10. Member
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: United Arab Emirates
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    Can the table be updated to cater to the new releases especially Sony vegas 10
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  11. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
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    @budwzr,
    mxf is NOT a codec, it's a container/fileformat (or more correctly, a Super-container, since it can also house the EDL/timelinelayout of assets). It's based on AAF or OMF. It can contain many kinds of assets (both audio & video) and they can be of various codecs, not just MPEG2.
    What's likely happening is that Vegas will ingest, say HDV, and instead of saving the MPEG2video+MP2audio to its native MPEG2_TS, it'll remux it into an MXF. On export, it would remux it back into an MPEG2_TS container.
    No recompression or anything, so it's fairly fast, but then ALL assets, no matter the source, are saved in the same kind of container.

    @Turmap,
    IIRC, AVID MC can also use Cineform as an intermediate, not just DNxHD. It's just that DNxHD comes WITH the AVID, being native to it.
    Also, AVID can make use of a similar Mainconcept plugin to the Premiere one to import AVCHD.

    Scott
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  12. Member budwzr's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2007
    Location: City Of Angels
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    @budwzr, mxf is NOT a codec, it's a container/fileformat
    Yeah, thanks for correcting me. At the time I wrote that, I thought it was something Sony cooked up. I don't use it much, since I got my new laptop, but I remember the smart recompress so I assumed it was Mpeg2.

    I guess the reason I thought that was when it's rendering, text will come on the preview window basically pointing out that no recompression is necessary in certain parts, so I thought they had a way to flag or put markers in there.

    That's the way Vegas does other stuff, they put timeline markers that can be saved if you use a Sony codec, and you're still compatible with the rest of the world.

    My error.
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  13. Member edDV's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Northern California, USA
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    Originally Posted by budwzr View Post
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    @budwzr, mxf is NOT a codec, it's a container/fileformat
    Yeah, thanks for correcting me. At the time I wrote that, I thought it was something Sony cooked up. I don't use it much, since I got my new laptop, but I remember the smart recompress so I assumed it was Mpeg2.
    HDV (tape) format is a subset of XDCAM-HD (BD/BE media) and uses a TS wrapper. XDCAM-EX is the flash ram version and uses a MXF wrapper. All use DV or MPeg2 video codecs. Since HDV is compatible with XDCAM, Sony Vegas is probably handling HDV as XDCAM internally, hence the MXF wrapper. Vegas will smart render all XDCAM/HDV versions natively. I copied this chart from the XDCAM Wikipedia article and highlighted HDV features.

    Click image for larger version

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XDCAM
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