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  1. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2009
    Location: United States
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    Hi all, Iím new to this forum and new to video editing and not very computer savvy. Please help!
    Hereís the story: I just bought a new PC from a friend that had Adobe Premiere Pro 7 on it and I wanted to start editing some home videos of my son. I have a Sony Handycam DCR SR-45 and all the video clips from that get imported to my PC as MPEG files. I tried importing those files into Premiere Pro and it crashes every time. I did some research and read that Premiere Pro does not work well with MPEG files, and that it works best with DV-AVI Type 2 files. So I did some research on that also and found that there are some freeware out there that converts MPEG files to DV-AVI Type 2 files. I chose to go with MPEG Streamclip to try the conversion. I downloaded it successfully with the Quicktime Alternative and all that, but when I loaded the MPEG video from my sony handycam into streamclip and was ready to convert it, I was lost. I guess I was hoping that it would be as simple as choosing from a dropdown menu and one of the choices would be DV-AVI Type 2. I didnít see anything like that, maybe Iím missing something, can anyone help?
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  2. Hi & welcome

    If you are planning to burn the files to a DVD eventually, you would be better off leaving them in the mpeg format. DVD is mpeg2 basically, meaning if you were to convert to DV & then edit, you would then have to reconvert to mpeg again, thus loosing quality twice, my suggestion is, use an mpeg editor, check the tools list to the <----left. MPEG StreamClip is an mpeg editor along with many others.

    Correct me if this is not what you are planning on doing.

    Denis
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  3. Member
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    Thank you for your reply.
    Yes I am planning on burning onto a DVD. Premiere Pro keeps crashing everytime I import the MPEG files though. I used MPEG Streamclip and did a test conversion, I went to 'Export AVI' in the File Menu and played around with some of the settings (didn't know what I was doing) and when I imported that file into PPro it worked, I was able to edit the clip with ease but the audio was all messed up.
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  4. Let me start again...........What editing do you want to do with the mpeg files that you have, do you just want to cut & join or do you want to do some other type of editing?
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  5. Member
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    I want to do the basic cutting and joining, I also want to add music and sound effects from other sources, add effects, add text, color correct, replace images within a video clip if possible. I'm a creative person so I really want the video to look as cool as a movie or music video would look- using Adobe Premiere because that's all I have. And yes, please dumb everything down for me.
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  6. can you play the cam mpegs? try media player classic. is the sound working? the video has ac-3 audio and premiere 7 may not like it or you may not have an ac-3 codec on the computer. pp7 should work with mpeg-2.
    Extensive video format support
    Import and work with MPEG-1, MPEG-2, DV, AVI, Windows Media 9 Series, and QuickTime formats.
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  7. Member
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    Yeah the MPEGs from the camcorder work fine when played in real player, audio and everything. Basically what I'm trying to ask is: What can I do with the MPEG files (from my Sony handycam) to make them work in Premiere Pro using MPEG Streamclip?
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  8. i'd go a different way. use the free pgcdemux to demux the mpeg-2 into separate .mpv and ac3 streams. then import into pp7. then if pp7 doesn't like the ac3 you could convert it to stereo pcm wav and import it that way.
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  9. Member turk690's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2003
    Location: ON, Canada
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    to MAdNEZ, there is no such thing as Adobe Premiere Pro 7. There is (from when I started using it) Adobe Premiere 5.1c, 6.0, 6.5, then Premiere Pro 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, CS3 then CS4. Adobe also put out a watered down version called Premiere Elements (which I don't use and so have no idea exactly what versions there are past and current). Exactly what version do you have?
    It has been said Premiere is a bit klutzy with native MPEG editing, but from Pro 2.0 above, various SD resolution clips I have imported from certain camcorders (notably *.mod from Canon FS100, processed to bonafide *.mpg via Womble MPEG-VCR) have scrubbed decently on my PC. In fact, note that, with the proper hardware Premiere Pro 2.0 and above IS designed for natively editing HDV, which is full-flavored MPEG-2.
    And we come to your hardware: what does it consist of? You have to have decent specs for this as minimum: Core2Duo 3GHz, 4GB DDR2 SDRAM, nVidia 9xxxGT graphics card, separate HDDs for system and capture (defragmented, etc.), etc.
    Stop feeling suicidal just because he unfriended you on fezbuk.
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  10. i don't know which one it is but, there was a pp referred to as 7.0 from about 2003.

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  11. Member turk690's Avatar
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    to minidv2dvd, that is a picture of the Adobe Premiere Pro 1.0 box. You can probably say that Adobe Premiere Pro 1.0 is the same thing as Adobe Premiere 7.0. However, Adobe never used '7' (yet) in referring to any of its Premiere incarnations officially. While Adobe can be taken to task for introducing monikers and incontinuities in version numbering like this, greater blame for the resulting confusion should be placed on people who make ads like these without bothering to check just what it is being offered. This IS NOT a toy; it's a professional non-linear editing program that currently costs two front teeth and an earlobe (CS4). Adobe, along with sellers and distributors who commit such banal mistakes as version misreporting should be given a good solid wallop on the head with a guthrah.
    to MAdNEZ, if Adobe Premiere Pro 1.0 indeed is what you have, tough luck trying to import and edit MPEG on it. If you're just starting out, I suggest you spruce out your hardware and get the latest version of Premiere Elements to complement your SR45. Baby steps.
    Stop feeling suicidal just because he unfriended you on fezbuk.
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  12. Member
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    That Horse logo is exactly what comes up on the screen I guess I have PP 1.0. What can I use to convert my MPEGs so that they function on my version of PP?
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  13. ouch. you have a double whammy there. not only isn't mpeg-2 acceptable, i don't think pp1 will accept your ac-3 audio either. the way i'd go is to convert to a lossless code like huffyuv. if you don't have it it's free, click on it's name and download and install. next you'll need a front end to simplify things. mediacoder will convert mpeg-2 with ac3 audio to huffyuv with pcm wav audio that any editor should accept. don't forget to de-interlace as part of the conversion. the trade off is that the file size is going to be 10x as big as the mpeg-2.
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  14. Member
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    Damn that's a lot of work, should I just invest in another program like Final Cut Pro, or upgrade to Premiere Pro CS4? Would those work better with MPEG's and AC3 audio? I don't want to get Elements because I know it's limited and I know eventually I'd like to start making music videos for some up-coming pop singers that I know. After I learn all this technical stuff of course! What do you think, can Elements do what I need or should I invest in the professional level programs?
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  15. Member turk690's Avatar
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    to MAdNEZ, Premiere Pro CS4 is well and dandy if you can get it. It will natively open and edit MPEG and AC3. But any non-linear editing program in and of itself is only half the story. Required hardware is just as important, if not MORE important. The Premiere Pro 1.0 vintage your PC came with almost tells me you have a Pentium 4. This processor WILL NOT do. You have to get a mainstream Core 2 Duo at the very least (>3GHz), mounted on an Intel-chipset motherboard (preferably NOT VIA, or other non-Intel chipset), at least 4GB RAM and at least an nVidia 9500GT GPU, 2 separate HDDs (one system and programs, the other capture and editing).
    The NLE will only be as good as the hardware it runs on. For example, while it is possible to natively open and edit AVCHD hi-def files in CS4, even on PC with the specs I've mentioned, scrubbing the timeline will be worse than plodding on treacle. Adobe themselves point this out, although they toe the line at having to tell you that any realistic AVCHD workflow must include an intermediate codec, such as Cineform.
    That you will only capture and edit SD MPEG-2 doesn't remove the emphasis on suitable hardware.
    Stop feeling suicidal just because he unfriended you on fezbuk.
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  16. Member
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    OK so Elements for making music videos then? Thanks for everyone input on this issue.
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