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  1. Member blinky88's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Australia
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    Need advise about the removal of Arctic Silver from the pins on a CPU. Upon receipt of a CPU I purchased on e'Bay, I found one bent pin and an off white paste aound the sides and covering several of the pins. I haven't had need to use Arctic Silver and really don't know what it looks like, that said, from reading other threads about thermal paste I am guessing it is Arctic Silver. I am going to attempt to remove it ..but.. need advise on the best method. Any advise would be very much appreciated.
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  2. Member wtsinnc's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2006
    Location: United States
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    Here is a link to the Arctic Silver website. I found LOTS more using Google.

    http://209.85.215.104/search?q=cache:j8BEnIoDJTYJ:www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appinstruct...lnk&cd=1&gl=us
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  3. Member
    Join Date: May 2001
    Location: United States
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    Use a small acid brush (cut off some of the bristle so the length is only about twice the length of the pins) and iso alcohol to clean it off. It is non-conductive, so even if it all doesn't come off, it shouldn't hurt the device.
    ICBM target coordinates:
    26 14' 10.16"N -- 80 16' 0.91"W
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  4. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: USA
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    I use a new soft toothbrush and 99% isopropyl alcohol. Arctic Silver is grey in color. You probably have a ceramic based compound. Be careful, as the alcohol can make the die slippery and you don't want to drop it.
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  5. Member
    Join Date: Jan 2006
    Location: United States
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    The pins should have no paste of any kind because arctic silver and other thermal compounds should be applied only to the top surface of CPU and not to under side where pins are. I once bent a couple of pins on a CPU and had some difficulty getting them properly aligned, and I'd recommend returning it to seller if permitted.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: May 2001
    Location: United States
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    Originally Posted by bevills1
    The pins should have no paste of any kind because arctic silver and other thermal compounds should be applied only to the top surface of CPU and not to under side where pins are. I once bent a couple of pins on a CPU and had some difficulty getting them properly aligned, and I'd recommend returning it to seller if permitted.
    Yeah, but it would depend on:

    1) The "degreeness" of the bent pin,
    2) the eBay cost of the part,
    3) the cost to ship back the part,
    4) the "hassle" factor.

    A "slightly bent" pin should be no problem to correct. A "flattened" pin would probably be a lost cause (they are tempered, so their "bend-back" ability is low).

    And bevills1 is correct - no thermal compound belongs underneath the CPU where the pins are. But I assumed that this was just an application error.
    ICBM target coordinates:
    26 14' 10.16"N -- 80 16' 0.91"W
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  7. Member blinky88's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Australia
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    Thanks for all the replies, appreciated. Yes, I believe everyone would understand there should be no paste on the pins, however, that is the condition. And yes, I did google and found lots of comments, that said, over time I believe the members on this site can more often than not offer a little more than other sources. To SLK001, I believe you have the method I will run with, sounds good to me, I had intended to use a toothbrush. I think I will try to return it unless I can come to some agreement about a refund which may give me the incentive to have a go and fix it. The bent pin is my only remaining concern, it is around 45 degrees, I don't know just how brittle these pins are.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2003
    Location: USA
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    White paste is not Arctic Silver. That sounds like the less expensive Thermal compound. I believe it is a Titanium Dioxide compound.
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  9. Member
    Join Date: May 2001
    Location: United States
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    One thing that I would do prior to making a decision as to whether or not to send the CPU back or to try to bend the pin back, would be to go to the CPU manufacturer's site and download the spec sheet (specifically, the pin-out) for that particular CPU and check to see what function that pin performs. If it was a ground (VSS) or a N/C or a RESERVED, then I would feel more secure in attempting a "bend-back" - if it broke off, the effects of the damage would be minimal.

    You must show GREAT CARE when trying to bend the pin back that you don't damage OTHER pins in the process. The best way to straighten a pin is with a small diameter tube with a hole size that will just fit over the pin. Slowly correct the pins positioning until it aligns both with the pins in its row and column.

    It's not hard to do, but it's also not trivial.
    ICBM target coordinates:
    26 14' 10.16"N -- 80 16' 0.91"W
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  10. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: USA
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    I've straightened a few CPU pins that I bent myself. SLK001's method with a small tube is the method I used. Sometimes a tube off a canned air sprayer is small enough, or a similar plastic spray tube. As long as the pin doesn't have a sharp kink, there's a good chance of success.
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  11. Member tonydead's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2005
    Location: Colorado
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    Originally Posted by redwudz
    I've straightened a few CPU pins that I bent myself. SLK001's method with a small tube is the method I used. Sometimes a tube off a canned air sprayer is small enough, or a similar plastic spray tube. As long as the pin doesn't have a sharp kink, there's a good chance of success.
    Use a mechanical pencil tip (w/o the led of course).
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  12. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2003
    Location: USA
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    BTW for removing arctc silver or any other heat sink compound I guess I go simple. I use a Kleenex and wipe it off. If it has hardened I use a Thumbnail to carefully scrape it off then polish with the Kleenex. Of course that only works when it is not in the pins. I also do it with the CPU in a socket to avoid bending the pins.

    Now that the new Socket 775 CPUs have no pins it is so much better than the old days when we used to get the occasional new OEM CPU with a slightly bent pin or two.

    Intel has shifted a easily damaged part of the CPU off of the CPU and onto the Mobo maker with socket 775.

    We've always used a medical instrument (forceps)? for straightening as well as easy jumper changing. Something like these.

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  13. Member
    Join Date: Feb 2004
    Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
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    Originally Posted by TBoneit
    We've always used a medical instrument (forceps)? for straightening as well as easy jumper changing. Something like these.
    Hemostats. Handy tools to have.
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  14. Member blinky88's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Australia
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    Thank you all for suggestions. I decided to return it and spoke to the seller today by phone and he is going to refund money paid.
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