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  1. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: United States
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    Hey everyone.. I'm in need of some help. There is not a lot of info on burning dual layer dvd-r's yet. I'm on a brand new macbook pro. I refuse to buy toast. I'm using mac the ripper to back up my personal dvd collection, I'm then using disk utility to create an image, and burn to dvd-9. I don't mind shelling out the extra cash for dvd-9's since my burner is compatible. I feel it's well worth the quality and much easier than taking the extra step to compress. Either I'm not selecting the right image format.. or I'm not burning correctly. Here's a list of problems I'm running into.. Can anyone help me? and yes.. I've searched for days before asking.

    1. Mac the ripper works great. I am doing full disk extractions and I end up with a folder like this: NAME_OF_DVD > VIDEO_TS. My next step should be to create an image of the NAME_OF_DVD folder with disk utility correct? When I do this I get different formats of images to choose from: Compressed, read only, dvd/cd master, and hybrid. Do I use dvd/cd master or hybrid?.. and which folder am I making an image of: NAME_OF_DVD or VIDEO_TS?

    2. I've read a lot of forums that say you need to add an AUDIO_TS folder even if it is empty. Is this true?

    3. Does the image have to contain a certain type of file extension in order to play in stand alone dvd players? example: .iso .dmg .cdr??

    4. Am I making this more difficult than it really is? Can I simply take the folder that mac the ripper spit out and burn it directly on a dual layer dvd-r?

    Any input will help. Thanks in advance! I really planned on experimenting with this until I figured out, but I've already fried 4 dual layer dvd-r's and they are not cheap. I figured I better ask before I go bankrupt.
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2000
    Location: Sweden
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    I changed your topic subject and moved you to our mac section.
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  3. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
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    1. Assuming it fits, and it should, then dvd/cd master for your purposes. Compressed would be if you set a certain parameter or different disc size. Hybrid? Do you really wanna know? Then read this and don't say I didn't warn you. However, I don't have a Mac so I'm out of context here - only inferring.

    2. The, always empty, AUDIO_TS folder was implemented at the dawn of the DvD age with the thinking that you may need that allocation in case developments occur in audio down the road. However, it never was necessary. It's more of a traditional thing really. The old players may be looking for it, but all the new players are fine without it. Just to be safe, you can't go wrong including it (or just making one) since it doesn't hurt and costs 0 extra file size.

    3. These are just hypothetical file formats in a way. ISO is actually a virtual DvD - an actual digital version replica, and image, of a physical DvD. You need a virtual DvD drive on your computer (as if you installed a "real" new drive) that "loads" these like real DvDs. Your computer will actually think it's all physical and act that way. All this is done with software only. Usually an ISO is used for storage on a hard drive (kind of like .zip) and for testing purposes. Not sure how many DvD players can read them, but nevertheless, you don't need to convert to these formats for the players. DMG is similar, but in a Mac context (just like NRG is within Nero's world) and CDR is similar in the world of CD.

    4. All you need to do is copy the completed VIDEO_TS (and the AUDIO_TS if you wish) folder(s) as data onto a disc and Bob's your uncle.

    If you have a DvD that results, or even compresses, below 4GB, experiment with RW media first.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
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  4. Member
    Join Date: May 2004
    Location: chicago
    Search Comp PM
    not having toast makes things more difficult than they should be..i can understand your hatred of Roxio but disk utility isn't a suitable replacement..maybe dragon burn might fill the need...
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  5. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: United States
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    thanks for the info guys! Sorry for posting in the wrong area baldrick. Bob's my uncle? lol... what the hell does that mean?.. I'm good to go? Anyway.. that's probably why I was trashing so many dvdr's.. I was making an image of the video_ts folder and trying to burn through disk utility.. I'll try to burn video_ts directly as data and if that doesn't work I'll try a different burner like dragon burn. If worse comes to worse I'll give in and buy toast, but I really hate to. Well you guys were very helpful I'm at work at the moment, but as soon as I get home I'm going to play around with this some more. Thanks a ton for taking time to help me!
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  6. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
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    Originally Posted by alforra
    Thanks a ton for taking time to help me!
    Forgive my run-in sentences though... happens when you type super fast. But I didn't think you'd mind...
    Originally Posted by alforra
    Bob's my uncle? lol... what the hell does that mean?
    Didn't realize it may be a sarcastic Canadian comment.

    Bob's Your Uncle. = Voila! = You're good to go.

    You were correct indeed. :P

    And about image files like ISO. They are not meant for DvD players. It's kind of like using fake dentures over real teeth. What's the point?

    They're really a simulation, and kind of like a ZIP file, of an actual DvD really. I use them to test a DvD compilation that I've authored before burning it and some people use them for archiving their collection in a convenient format, like such as on a hard drive. You can name the file anything you want without having to manage dozens of folders all named "VIDEO_TS". And now certain software recognizes them immediately without even having to "load" them through an image drive or virtual drive anymore.

    Now I know some DvD players will read them, but not all. But this could be useful with the higher capacity of blu-ray discs in the future when we can put 5-10 whole DvDs on a disc by just burning the ISO versions of them. Nice thought though.

    Just burn what's inside the ISO - the VIDEO_TS (and AUDIO_TS) onto a blank disc and you're fine.

    Cheers.
    I hate VHS. I always did.
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  7. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2001
    Location: Silver Spring, MD USA
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    Hatred for Toast is causing too many workarounds for you. For everything thats worth (*smile*), Toast is an essential tool for every Mac owner.
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  8. Explorer Case's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2004
    Location: Middle Earth
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    Originally Posted by alforra
    1. Do I use dvd/cd master or hybrid?.. and which folder am I making an image of: NAME_OF_DVD or VIDEO_TS?
    You should use none of these options. The DVD disk image should have the UDF file system v1.02, and the Finder/Disk Utility's options won't give you that. A program like DVD Imager will image your DVD folder into an UDF disk image, which you may burn with Disk Utility.
    You should make an image of the NAME_OF_DVD folder, so that the NAME_OF_DVD will become the disc name. Unless the imaging application states otherwise (e.g. DVD Imager takes a VIDEO_TS folder and automatically adds an empty AUDIO_TS folder and also asks for a disc name).

    Originally Posted by alforra
    2. [...] add an empty AUDIO_TS folder
    For compatibility reasons, that is a good idea. It would suck if one of your clients couldn't run the DVD because of that, now wouldn't it?

    Originally Posted by alforra
    3. Does the image have to contain a certain type of file extension in order to play in stand alone dvd players? example: .iso .dmg .cdr??
    The suffix of image file is only for file-program association on your computer and will not appear on the disc. Stick with the default. You don't burn the image as a data file on the DVD, but burn from the image (as source material) to DVD. You don't burn the image file, but the content of the image file. See the difference?

    Originally Posted by alforra
    4. Am I making this more difficult than it really is? Can I simply take the folder that mac the ripper spit out and burn it directly on a dual layer dvd-r?
    You only need to make an image first if your burning tools do not have options for burning with the UDF file system (or for pre-burning testing purposes). Specialized burning applications like Toast can burn using UDF directly.
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    Well I took a bit of everyone's advice and ran with it. I've burnt my first successful dvd-r and my first successful dual layer dvd-r today.. and guess what. I did it all for free. Looked into alternatives for Toast.. turns out there are a few. I downloaded a program called Burn 1.72. It works great! I'm using mac the ripper and burning with burn 1.72.. tested on 4 different dvd players.. an xbox 360 and 2 computers. Works all around.. I highly suggest getting burn for any of you mac users.. also I read really good reviews on a program called liquid cd. F*CK TOAST!! Thanks all.
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  10. Member terryj's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: N3525.24068, W09734.204
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    No need to Cuss...that can cause you to get bit in the arse
    one day when you might just really need Toast....

    Has happened MANY times before.......
    "Everyone has to learn, so that they can one day teach."
    ------------------------------------------------------
    When I'm not here, Where can I be found?
    Urban Mac User
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  11. Member PuzZLeR's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Location: Toronto Canada
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    A good slogan for Roxio:

    "You're toast without Toast..."

    Yeah, Ok, cheesy, and probably been said before. Couldn't resist though. :P
    I hate VHS. I always did.
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  12. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2006
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    Try DVD Image Utility. Simply drop the DVD folder onto DVD Image Utility and it creates the DVD image file. Then drop the image file onto its icon to then burn it to blank media.
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