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  1. Member
    Join Date: Mar 2008
    Location: Canada
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    Hi,

    New to the forum. Wanting to convert a .VRO file to some type of format to be burned onto a DVD that can be played on standard DVD players.

    I have a Pioneer DVR-533H-S DVD recorder with hard drive. I make DVD-R discs on the machine and they play fine only on that player, but I want to play them on a standard DVD player as well....not sure what program to use to convert the .VRO file to.

    I've read the previous thread, Editing/converting VRO files (http://forum.videohelp.com/topic347739.html) and did not fully get a confirmation I was comfortable with deciding on...

    Here's a pic of the actual files on the DVD created from my DVD recorder.

    Thanks,
    Kenneth

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  2. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
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    As you have read, you use one of the programs mentioned to import the VRO on to your HDD. Some programs may recognise the VRO extension or at that point rename it to MPG.

    Use a dvd authoring program to then make a disk to play both in stand-alones and PC players.

    TMPGenc dvd author has been mentioned. I do not know how this handles multi-sessions - where there is more than one video file in the VRO.

    If you use Ulead DVD Movie Factory then you can select which movies to import. You do not have to rename them to MPG - the program does it for you. It immediately places the clips in the time line. You can do some basic editing. Create the menu etc etc. Get the 30 day free try-before-you-buy version to see if this serves your purpose.

    If you want to do more editing than just trimming you could try Ulead Video Studio. The import function works exactly the same as with DVD movie factory. It also makes a basic dvd.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
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    Ulead will re-encode everything, TMPGEnc-Author will not. TMPGEnc will give the option of importing all or selected video sessions, as well as keeping chapter points. TMPGEnc also has a very robust editing function that will satisfy most anyone. I have both, and use TMPGEnc exclusively for it's ease of use and high-quality output.
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  4. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
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    Originally Posted by CDan
    Ulead will re-encode everything, TMPGEnc-Author will not. TMPGEnc will give the option of importing all or selected video sessions, as well as keeping chapter points. TMPGEnc also has a very robust editing function that will satisfy most anyone. I have both, and use TMPGEnc exclusively for it's ease of use and high-quality output.
    Absolutely wrong.

    If the source video is dvd-compliant - we are talking about recordings from a DVD-recorder - then NO re-encoding is done.

    I have source VRO files on dvd-r or dvd-rw imported into these programs so I know EXACTLY how they work/
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  5. Member classfour's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2002
    Location: The Heartland, United States
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    TDA, MPEG2VCR will import.
    ;/ l ,[____], Its a Jeep thing,
    l---L---o||||||o- you wouldn't understand.
    (.)_) (.)_)-----)_) "Only In A Jeep"
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Mar 2008
    Location: Canada
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    Wow, thanks so much for all the replies and suggestions.

    I'll try out some of the recommended ideas this weekend. Thanks again.
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  7. Hi! Please let me get absolutely clear on this issue as I am thinking about buying a Panasonic DVD-RAM standalone recorder. Let' say that I record from a VHS tape to a DVD-RAM disc in one session, that is, recording the whole movie to a DVD-RAM disc by pressing "record" and then "stop" when the VHS movie is finished. Regarding the resulting VRO file, can I just change the ending to MPEG, and be absolutely certain that this MPEG file can be used at a later date with most (if not all) DVD authoring sotwares (resulting in VOB, BUP, IFO)?

    I know, you might be thinking why I don't directly input the VRO files to something like "Ulead Video Studio" to end up with a standard DVD-Video on DVD-R, etc. To begin with, I am just interested in having compatible MPEG files for the time being so as to be able to dedicate my time to tranfering my VHS collection in raw form. This pre-supposes that I am not interested in the IFO files, etc., as those can be recreated from the raw MPEG files when I finally decide to authore the files to DVD-R, etc. Also, I would still need to do some editing on the files, and an MPEG file is the best option for editing.

    Olé,

    Carlbert "DM" Lacaye
    Disco Makberto
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
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    Hi! Please let me get absolutely clear on this issue as I am thinking about buying a Panasonic DVD-RAM standalone recorder. Let' say that I record from a VHS tape to a DVD-RAM disc in one session, that is, recording the whole movie to a DVD-RAM disc by pressing "record" and then "stop" when the VHS movie is finished. Regarding the resulting VRO file, can I just change the ending to MPEG, and be absolutely certain that this MPEG file can be used at a later date with most (if not all) DVD authoring sotwares (resulting in VOB, BUP, IFO)?
    VRO and VOB files are wrappers for MPEG2 video, which means that there are additional elements present that you would not find in an actual .mpg file. Maybe they'd still work fine and play fine later if treated as .mpg files, but maybe not. It is probably better not to use this method.

    Panasonic DVD recorders have the ability to record on DVD-RW discs, which are also reusable and usually less expensive. After almost 3 years of using both RAM and DVD-RW with a Pannasonic DVD Recorder, I'd recommend DVD-RW for recording anything one eventually want to save to DVD+-R, with or without editing and authoring. More tools work with VOB files than VRO files.
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  9. Member
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    Originally Posted by Disco Makberto
    Hi! Please let me get absolutely clear on this issue as I am thinking about buying a Panasonic DVD-RAM standalone recorder. Let' say that I record from a VHS tape to a DVD-RAM disc in one session, that is, recording the whole movie to a DVD-RAM disc by pressing "record" and then "stop" when the VHS movie is finished. Regarding the resulting VRO file, can I just change the ending to MPEG, and be absolutely certain that this MPEG file can be used at a later date with most (if not all) DVD authoring sotwares (resulting in VOB, BUP, IFO)?
    I've been doing this for years with my Panny recorder and never had a single issue.
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  10. Hello, usually_quiet and C-Dan!

    The reason why I am mentioning Panasonic recorders and DVD-RAM discs is because I have read many times on the Internet that the best transfer, using a Panasonic recorder, is from VHS to DVD-RAM as opposed to going from VHS to DVD-R, VHS to DVD+R, etc. I don't actually own a Panasonic myself, so I cannot personally backup my assumption, but that is what I have read.

    As for VRO (or VOB) and MPEG files, I bellieve that they are pretty much the same when we are dealing with simple VRO (or VOB) files, that is, a single video part with a single audio part. The issue becomes a problem when we are dealing wih multiple angles, multiple audio, etc., which is extra information that is contained on VRO (or VOB) files but not on MPEG files. However, transfering a plain old unsophisticathed (sp?) VHS tape to VRO and ultimately to MPEG without multiple angles, multiple audio, etc., should be an easy task.

    I don't understand why it has been brought to our attention that a DVD-RAM disc with VRO files should be recorded in one session in order to change the VRO files to MPEG without any issues. Apparently, a DVD-RAM disc with VRO files recorded in multiple sessions whose VRO files have been changed to MPEG files have playback problems, and many times only some parts can be read. Hence we need to record the whole DVD-RAM in one session (if we subsequently change the VRO files to MPEG files).

    Oh, yes! Of course, we can convert the VRO files with softwares (MPEG Streamclip, Womble, etc.) but if a simple file name change is feasible, why bother?

    Carlos "DM" Lacaye
    Disco Makberto
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  11. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
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    Oh, yes! Of course, we can convert the VRO files with softwares (MPEG Streamclip, Womble, etc.) but if a simple file name change is feasible, why bother?
    If you looked at a .VRO, a .VOB. and an .mpg file which all contained exactly the same video and audio (no extra components in the .VOB) they would be different sizes, and the .mpg would be the smallest of the three. In addition VOB's and I think VRO's, can contain chapter information (even if they are created by a camcorder or DVD recorder) while .mpg's don't. If you simply rename files, you are assuming that software and hardware will ignore the differences between what you say the file is, and what it really is, which they are under no obligation to do. You may never run into a problem from that, but you don't know when you will encounter something that is picky about what it will take. Better safe than sorry IMHO.
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  12. Hi, there!

    It is really interesting to know that two VRO (or VOB) and MPEG files with exactly the same video material (no extras) have different sizes. I still don't understand why because they are supposed to be the same.

    Yes, after changing VRO to MPEG, chaper information will be lost. But I am okay with that because I would keep the MPEG files as sort of intermediate files before authoring. When I do authoring, then I would add chapter information, menus, etc.

    You are right that one never knows which authoring program will accept renamed MPEG files coming from VRO files. However, quite a few do like Ulead, Tmpeg, etc.

    If I encounter something picky, as you are kindly pointing out, well, I suppose I can rename the files back to VRO, and restart from there.

    Re: link

    Excellent point when mentioning that it is better to use Panasonic DVD-RAM discs when dealing with a Panasonic recorder. I will just do that.

    As for dubbing, yes, the more we are approaching real time, the less likely it is to encounter dubbing problems.

    Thansk to all,

    CAL
    Disco Makberto
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  13. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
    Location: United States
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    I presume oldfart13 is referring us to Panasonic Movie Album. From what I have read about it, this program is intended to be used only with Panasonic DVD burners installed on a PC, and with Panasonic or Hitachi camcorders. It may be very helpful to people who have the right hardware to use it, but unfortunately for me, I am not one of them.

    At this point, I am OK with that. Since both MPEG Streamclip and Project X accept and demultiplex VRO files, they are all I really need. Demultiplexed video and audeo files are what I prefer for editing and authoring.


    Disco Makberto wrote:
    Yes, after changing VRO to MPEG, chaper information will be lost. But I am okay with that because I would keep the MPEG files as sort of intermediate files before authoring. When I do authoring, then I would add chapter information, menus, etc.
    You are missing my point. The problem is not that this information is lost, but that it is still embedded in the re-named files, where it shouldn't be. You are depending upon your authoring software to recognize that, and remove any old chapter information that is present, in addition to creating new chapters.

    If Ulead and TDA work for you with renamed files, and the DVD's they create play correctly, great. However, it is my understanding that Ulead and TDA also work with .VRO files that have not been renamed.
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  14. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2000
    Location: Canada
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    The Movie Album software has worked with all my burners, not just the Panasonic one. That included several LGs and Pioneers. TDA will also work with other files, including VROs, VOBs, Mpegs, etc. as well as files from HDD DVD recorders such as Liteon and Daytek. I'm doing one right now from my Daytek 950-S DVD recorder's hard drive directly to the computer via an external USB 2.0 drive enclosure. TDA sees all the files on the drive as separate programs. I haven't had occassion to use the demux video and audio method in a long time. I used to when I was doing conversions to SVCD but that was years ago.
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  15. Member
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    Originally Posted by oldfart13
    The Movie Album software has worked with all my burners, not just the Panasonic one. That included several LGs and Pioneers. TDA will also work with other files, including VROs, VOBs, Mpegs, etc. as well as files from HDD DVD recorders such as Liteon and Daytek. I'm doing one right now from my Daytek 950-S DVD recorder's hard drive directly to the computer via an external USB 2.0 drive enclosure. TDA sees all the files on the drive as separate programs. I haven't had occassion to use the demux video and audio method in a long time. I used to when I was doing conversions to SVCD but that was years ago.
    My budget for this hobby is tiny. Hence I use freeware tools for authoring/editing that either require, or work best, with demultiplexed files. I tried TDA when I became interested in editing/authoring for DVD, and I think it is a great program in most respects, but can't justify the expense for myself.

    Panasonic Movie Album is within my budget, but the only DVD-RAM discs I have are 3X, which you say are problematic in http://forum.videohelp.com/topic341861.html?highlight=panasonic%20movie%20album.
    Maybe the latest version of Panasonic Movie Album would address this, though at this point, I just don't think I have a real need for this software. If you think it would be of use to you, Panasonic still provides updates to the program via its website for those who already own it.
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  16. >You are missing my point. The problem is not that this information is lost, but that it is still embedded in the re-named files, >where it shouldn't be. You are depending upon your authoring software to recognize that, and remove any old chapter >information that is present, in addition to creating new chapters.

    Point well taken, and usually_quiet is right! I wasn't taking into account that the information is still embedded in the renamed files.

    Following a different approach, then, I need to find a better way to change the files from VRO to MPEG without any re-encoding and/or re-editing.

    As I am dinning out right now, I will post again some hours from now.

    CAL
    Disco Makberto

    P.S.: No, I am not interested in "creating new chapters". I am just interested in changing the files from VRO to MPEG and keep them as MPEG for a long time. At this stage, although I will do it eventually, I have no interest in editing and/or authoring. Thanks!
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  17. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
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    Originally Posted by Disco Makberto
    P.S.: No, I am not interested in "creating new chapters". I am just interested in changing the files from VRO to MPEG and keep them as MPEG for a long time. At this stage, although I will do it eventually, I have no interest in editing and/or authoring. Thanks!
    While I will use it as a demultiplexer, MPEG Streamclip also allows one to convert a .VRO (or a .VOB set) on a DVD disc to an .mpg on a hard drive. When I tried it for conversion to .mpg, it did not re-encode anything. It just stripped away unwanted bits of information as it wrote the new file to my hard drive. This takes longer than copying from disc to hard drive, plus changing the file extension from .VRO to .mpg, but only minutes longer. The resulting .mpg was a little smaller than the original .VRO too, which is always a plus when storing things on a hard drive. You can even choose to create a .mpg using only part of a VRO, if you don't want to save all of it.
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  18. Hello, usually-quiet!

    This is exactly what I was trying to achieve, and I didn't know it was as straightforward as you are saying, so thanks very much for the information. You know, as a matter of fact, your method saves me one step because I was thinking about ripping the VRO file from the DVD-RAM disc to the hard drive prior to the convertion to MPEG.

    While we are at it, do you know of a tutorial for MPEG Streamclip and the process you are mentioning? I have been trying to find one but unsuccessfully. Alternatively, if it were not too much to ask, could you please let me know briefly how to go from VRO on the DVD-RAM disc to MPEG on the hard drive?

    'Till next time,

    Carlos Albert "DM"
    Disco Makberto
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  19. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2000
    Location: Canada
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    The 3X doscs are problematic only in the LG H22L burner. They record fine in my E80H Panasonic recorder as well, they work fine in my friend's LG H11 burner and my old LG 4163 burner.
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  20. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
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    Originally Posted by Disco Makberto
    While we are at it, do you know of a tutorial for MPEG Streamclip and the process you are mentioning? I have been trying to find one but unsuccessfully. Alternatively, if it were not too much to ask, could you please let me know briefly how to go from VRO on the DVD-RAM disc to MPEG on the hard drive?
    The download for the official version of MPEG Streamclip (1.1) comes with an English language guide in both .rtf and .pdf format. It also includes an Italian laguage guide in .rtf format. The beta version only includes release notes.

    I did not need to change any of the program's default settings. These are the steps I followed:

    1. Open MPEG Streamclip.

    2. Left click on "File" in the menu bar and select "Open Files"

    3. Navigate to the drive containing the DVD-RAM disc. Open the drive, then open the DVD_RTAV folder and select VR_MOVIE.VRO.

    4. After the file loads, allow MPEG Streamclip to "Fix Timecode Breaks" if it found any.

    5. To convert the whole .VRO file: That is selected by default, so go directly to step 6. To convert only part of the VRO file, follow the official guide's instructions for editing.

    6. Left click on "File" in the menu bar and select "Convert to MPEG". (This program allows a second kind of .mpg conversion, "Convert to Headed MPEG", but if one is dealing with files from a DVD recorder, that option appears to be useful only for those who author with Nero Vision.)

    7. Navigate to the hard drive folder where the .mpg file will be saved and type in a name for the the file.

    8. Wait for MPEG streamclip to finish.

    Originally Posted by oldfart13
    The 3X doscs are problematic only in the LG H22L burner. They record fine in my E80H Panasonic recorder as well, they work fine in my friend's LG H11 burner and my old LG 4163 burner.
    Good to know that if I run into a situation where I need Panasonic Movie Album, it will probably work for me.
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  21. All perfect, usually_quiet! Thanks a lot!

    CAL
    DM
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