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  1. Member
    Join Date: Mar 2006
    Location: United States
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    My camcorders 1394 firewire output connector is wiggly and I sometimes lose connection when uploading video to my Vegas6.

    Anyway.... is there a miniDV player out there with a 1394 firewire output that doesnt cost over $1,000???? I've looked at B&HPhoto and every miniDV player they have is $1,000 or better....geewiz!

    Looking for a solution... Please help.
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  2. How about another miniDV camcorder?

    Or eBay for a used Sony DSR-11 - there's few up there now.
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  3. Get yourself a Canon HV20 for $699. Then you will have miniDV and HDV...
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  4. BuskerAlley.com zoobie's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2005
    Location: Colorado Rocky Mountains
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    $699? That's pretty amazing
    losing half the cam's value the first year is also amazing...
    Author, Producer, Composer, Director - Canon HDV, Konica SLR, LG BD burner
    Handcoder: HTML, PHP, JS, CSS
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  5. Half the value, when that camcorder came out the suggested retail was $999. When it hit the street it was selling at circuit city for $899. So half the value is a great exageration. The camera is a performer, unfortunately consumers have fallen for the HDD models and the DVDr models, which to be honest I think for durability, longevity and archival purposes DV tape is the better solution.

    Anyhow, the person who suggested purchasing a new minidv camcorder was certainly stearing in the right direction, plus for less than the $1000 for the deck you can go HD, plus on a pro level the HV20 can playback tapes from its big brother XH1 with all for audio tracks you can't go wrong.

    Lastly, not to stir a battle hear, he could go with your Sony, but the Canon IMO has better optics, performs better in low light, and IMO is bit over priced for what it is. Lastly the Canon AIF definately out performs just about all the cameras on the market. One other thing on this camera, even though a lot of the software on the market does not offer full support for the 24P feature yet, they will in the near future.

    Anyhow, no matter what is decided, I personally think buying another camcorder is the way to go, even if its a JVC, Sony or Canon.
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  6. By the way, costco has the HV20 for $750 right now. Buying it from costco gives you a 2 year warranty which is not a bad deal. I bought 2 in October from Circuit City for $1400 out the door for a multi cam live event I had to film. The price is definately right.

    Good luck with what you decide.

    http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11212694&search=hv20&Mo=0&cm_re=1_en-...=1&topnav=&s=1
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  7. Member danielheldman's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: United States
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    This one does 1080/24P for $750... NO WAY...
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  8. Member danielheldman's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: United States
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    1/2.7" CMOS Sensor <<< I assume in low light, picture quality will look like XXXX
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  9. You may want to check the reviews, it actually does really well in low light especially in 24P mode...
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  10. Member 2Bdecided's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
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    The reviews are somewhat misleading. By default, the Sony and Canon consumer HD camcorders drop the shutter speed dramatically in low light (it's called "auto slow shutter" on the Canon) giving almost a stop-motion look to the movement in very low light.

    In some reviews, this function is disabled, in others it isn't. That explains some of the bizarre results on camcorderinfo.com.

    Switching the Canon to 24p decreases the shutter speed, so of course it works better in low light - especially compared against another camcorder with the "auto slow shutter" disabled!

    In reality, the laws of physics haven't changed - most sensors are pretty good, and it's the amount of light hitting each pixel that determines the noise - this is down to the lens itself, the size of the pixel (sensor size / number of pixels), the shutter speed, and most importantly the amount of light hitting the subject itself.

    The HV20 is pretty good in low light, but it's a consumer camcorder - not a pro machine. If you can afford a pro machine, get one. If OTOH, you're thinking "I'll get an SD camcorder instead because bigger pixels = less noise" you're missing out on HD and more-but-smaller noise, and IMO making a mistake.

    Cheers,
    David.
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  11. Member danielheldman's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: United States
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    David,

    What about JVC GYHD100A.
    Any comments and modification on this camera?
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