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  1. I have a DVD movie on my hard drive and I would like to know a simple way to delay or advance the sound by (for example) 500ms. I know that VirtualDubMod can easily be used to delay/advance sound in an avi video file, but it can't be used to delay the sound in a DVD. Any ideas on this topic would be appreciated.
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
    Location: Canada
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    Your question is unclear: did you want to advance/delay for playback on your PC? or did you want to re-encode your DVD files to burn on a DVD later?

    For playback on a PC, yes you can easily. The specific steps depends on which software DVD player you are using (e.g. media player classic, VLC...)
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  3. You demux the assets, correct the delay either in the authoring program or using DelayCut, and you remux. It's simple in principle but just takes some time to accomplish.
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  4. I am sorry that I didn't make my question clear. I want to take a DVD movie that is on my hard drive and (using a simple method) delay/advance the sound/audio by, for example, 500 ms, and then have a new DVD movie created where the sound will now be delayed/advanced. I prefer not to re-code ( a 6 hour ordeal on my computer) but if re-coding is the only way, then (still) let me know the simplest way to do this job. Ultimately, I want to burn the DVD to a disk.
    The reason I want to do this is I have a DVD player that always plays the audio on reburnable disks about 800ms late. It is the fault of the DVD player. (Non reburnable disks are played just fine.) Also, I think it is useful to know how to do this job (delay/advance audio directly in DVD).
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  5. I am trying to get a clear way to do this. You said:
    You demux the assets, correct the delay either in the authoring program or using DelayCut, and you remux. It's simple in principle but just takes some time to accomplish.
    So can I use PgcDemux and then separate out the video, sound and subtitles?
    After I have the video, sound and subtitles, how do I delay/advance the sound?
    Then can I use Muxman and input the video, sound and subtitles to make the DVD?
    Or, you said "delay... in the authoring program". What authoring program allows me to delay/advance the sound by up to 1000ms?
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  6. If I want to use DelayCut to delay the audio by, for example 800ms, do I type in 800ms in the "start" box or "end" box or both boxes? (See screen shot.) And should I tick or untick the "original length box? Also, in the "input file" box, can I insert the audio file that PgcDemux generates, or does the audio first have to be converted to another format? Also, what are "CRC errors" and what should I tick in that box?

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  7. I tried using PgcDemux, Delay Cut, Muxman but the subtitles changed color and are difficult to read. Same problem when played with both Media Player Classic and Power DVD. (see screenshot) Does anyone know what is wrong?

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  8. I prefer not to re-code
    Who said anything about reencoding?
    So can I use PgcDemux and then separate out the video, sound and subtitles?
    Yes, that's how I'd do it.
    After I have the video, sound and subtitles, how do I delay/advance the sound?
    I already told you two ways - the authoring program if it allows for that, or DelayCut.
    Then can I use Muxman and input the video, sound and subtitles to make the DVD?
    Yes, and VobBlanker to stick the Muxman reauthored movie back into the original DVD.
    Or, you said "delay... in the authoring program". What authoring program allows me to delay/advance the sound by up to 1000ms?
    Muxman allows for only up to +/- 300 ms, so in your case DelayCut is the better choice. In the Delay section you circled in red, fill in only the Start with the proper delay (positive to make the audio play later and negative to make it play earlier), and leave everything else alone. DelayCut works with the original AC3 audio you got out of PGCDemux.
    Does anyone know what is wrong?
    If you then stick the DVD back into the original DVD, you'll get back your colors. If what Muxman gave you is OK (movie-only backup), to change the colors open it in PGCEdit, double-click the video, and in the CLUT click on the red and blue colors (both probably, but not necessarily, in the top row) and change them to whatever you like.
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  9. Thank you very much for the info. I've got several questions.
    First, why did the process (PgcDemux /Muxman) mess up the subtitle colors? Originally I had nice white subtitles with a black outline that were very easy to read, so I don't understand why the subtitles changed to blue with red outline. I never wanted to change the subtitle colors.
    Second, you said to use PGCEdit to correct the subtitle color problem, but I already had DVDSubEdit on my computer so I wanted to try and use that software. So I opened up the full domain and in the "Subpic Color" box, there were 4 squares ( labeled b,p,e1,e2) that had the strange red and blue colors. Since there are 4 squares, I didn't know what colors I should change the squares, so I loaded another (known good) movie and looked at the squares and so I changed the color of the squares to match that of the known good movie (see screen shot 1 ). However, after doing this, and playing the movie, , the subtitles looked much better, but there was a strange blue tinge on the outline of the subtitles. So I read the DVDSubEdit manual and and did a Shift -Click operation (see screenshot 2, DVDSubEdit manual)
    Just by luck/chance that totally fixed the problem, the subtitles are perfect now, but I don't understand what I did, and I read the manual many times and don't understand the part about the Shift-Click. Could you please explain that part more clearly? And what was the bluish tinge on the outline of the subtitle even after I had changed the 4 squares to either black or white? Alternately, if I want to skip the step with DVDSubEdit and use VobBlanker instead, what are the final steps in using VobBlanker to get the final DVD?
    By the way, I just burned the disk and played it in the DVD player which delays the audio by poor design, and by advancing the audio 800ms, now the audio is perfect when played back on this DVD player. I think this topic (how to delay or advance audio directly in DVD) should be made into a sticky.



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  10. Member AlanHK's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2006
    Location: Hong Kong
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    Originally Posted by jimdagys
    the subtitles are perfect now, but I don't understand what I did
    As I understand it (no claims of expertise), subtitles have 4 colours defined in the CLUT, stored in the IFO. However, there is no rule for which of the 4 colours is used for outline, fill, background and transparency (I think). So colour 1 might be the fill in one subtitle, but the outline in another. So two subtitles can both refer to the same IFO and CLUT, but have different appearances because they are using the colours differently.

    This is one of the things DVDSubedit can fix.
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  11. First, why did the process (PgcDemux /Muxman) mess up the subtitle colors?
    It didn't. The IFOs (and the CLUT) it created gave you the BMP colors as contained in the SUP file. Subtitle colors are overlayed on top of the BMP colors. At least I think that's what happens. Since Muxman has no way to know what the colors were on the original retail DVD (again, they're not defined in the SUP file), you don't get the colors you want. I did say, however, that if you were to replace the DVD back into the original, you'd get your colors back, as the original Casablanca DVD CLUT defines the subtitle colors. Or you can define them again using DVDSubEdit or (easier, I think) PGCEdit. Or you can do a copy and paste of the CLUT from the original into the Muxman authored DVD, also using PGCEdit.
    Alternately, if I want to skip the step with DVDSubEdit and use VobBlanker instead, what are the final steps in using VobBlanker to get the final DVD?
    Open the original retail DVD in VobBlanker. Highlight the movie so it appears in the lower screen. Highlight it in the lower screen and hit the "Replace" button to the right. Scroll to your Muxman authored DVD and click on the VTS_01_0.IFO. Give it an Output folder and Process.
    I think this topic (how to delay or advance audio directly in DVD) should be made into a sticky.
    Do you really think a lot of people have defective DVD players like yours and need to do this? And what about when you finally replace your piece-of-junk player with a decent player and suddenly all your DVDs play with out-of-synch audio? Or if you lend out one of the DVDs to a friend and he complains about the audio you purposely messed up?
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  12. Thank you very very much for the info, esp on VobBlanker. For an experiment, I am going to use Muxman to get the screwed up colored subtitles again and then try to follow your instructions and use VobBlanker to fix without using DVDSub Edit. At first I was confused when you said, "replace the DVD back into the original", but now I think I got the idea.
    As far as replacing the DVD player,
    the DVD player was thrown out by someone else because they didn't select the correct option in audio setup, and therefore couldn't get the English voice, so I think this DVD player is special because I saved it from the landfill. My previous DVD player would not play DVD reburnable disks at all.
    I also want to experiment a bit more with DVDSub Edit and the CLUT to see if I can better figure out what I did.
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  13. Member AlanHK's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2006
    Location: Hong Kong
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    Originally Posted by manono
    And what about when you finally replace your piece-of-junk player with a decent player and suddenly all your DVDs play with out-of-synch audio? Or if you lend out one of the DVDs to a friend and he complains about the audio you purposely messed up?
    I think it would be wise to make the new videos with two soundtracks; the original one, and as a second soundtrack, the time-shifted one.

    Thus in the future you can use the DVD in a "normal" player. For now, just select the alternate soundtrack.

    If there's not enough space for a second soundtrack, though there probaly is, you could squeeze them down by compressing them, to say 128k AC3. (Use ffmpeggui, eg.) Standard DVDs seem to be at least twice that, but 128k is still fine unless you have a symphony concert.
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  14. Interesting idea about adding a second soundtrack. By the way I figured out completely how to solve the subtitle color problems. I use DVDSub Edit file>open full domain>first VOB. The problem is, the software is geeky, providing hundreds of subtitle colors, when 99.9% of everybody wants either white or yellow subtitles with a black outline. (See screenshot 1) If you look closely at the subtitle letters, you can see the letters are either white or yellow, with a black outline. The color or the letter is called parameter e1 (red circle in screenshot 2), and the outline of the letter is called parameter p (green circle). Just choose the colors you want for the letters "e1" (most likely white or yellow) and then make sure to choose black for the "p" outline. I found that it is necessary to turn up the contrast and brightness on the computer monitor to the maximum to truly be able to select the pure black, otherwise you might be selecting dark blue, or dark red, or dark green, etc, and then the outline of the subtitles will have a strange ghosting coloration. To select the colors, read the screenshot 3 (Changing the color indexes into the CLUT) and also the above posting, "Changing the CLUT colors".





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  15. 1. In your example the main color was e1, but that's not always the case. And often there's an anti-aliasing color involved. I often anti-alias the subs I create or edit, and quite a few commercial DVDs use anti-aliasing.
    2. There's a pretty good guide out for this, in addition to the very good included tutorial:

    http://download.videohelp.com/DVDSubEdit/Guides/ChangingColors/Guide.htm

    3. In my opinion your 99.9% of the people preferring white or yellow is a bit high. As far as I'm concerned yellow is good only for anime and white is good for nothing. I much prefer a nice grey color, as does Criterion, Eclipse, Warner Home Video, and others. I recognize I'm not in the majority in this, but maybe a strong minority would agree.

    Good going on getting your audio and subtitle problems solved. And just think of how much you learned in the process.
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  16. Thanks for the reference tutorial (http://download.videohelp.com/DVDSubEdit/Guides/ChangingColors/Guide.htm)
    However, in his example, he doesn't make clear which parameter is the anti-aliasing color. Can I assume that "e2" is the anti-aliasing color (see below screenshot)? Then, in my above example with white and yellow subtitles, what color should I use for anti-aliasing?

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  17. You can't assume anything. That was one of my points in my last post. Yes, the antialias color is most likely to be e2, but not necessarily. Check the colors you have in the DVD and find them in DVDSubEdit. Then experiment in changing them around and testing the result by moving that clear-opaque slider around to see what does what. And you can only find an antialias color if there's one to be found. Often one of the colors is unused.
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  18. Member AlanHK's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2006
    Location: Hong Kong
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    Originally Posted by jimdagys
    Can I assume that "e2" is the anti-aliasing color
    There is no rule for which colour is used for what. It's just a palette, how each colour is used depends on the app that made it.

    But as you found, DVDsubedit can remap them. You just play with them to get the effect you want.
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