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  1. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2007
    Location: South Africa
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    sometimes i find myseelf trying to copy DVD discs that has some scratches on them, iv'e tried DVD shrink and it stops at a certain point, clone DVD doesn't work either it says OH NO!!!. so i was thinking there must be someting that wil copy it?


    then again maybe not!!!
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  2. Member AlanHK's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2006
    Location: Hong Kong
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    1) Isopuzzle

    2) Clean the disc -- wash in water and dishwashing liquid, dry with a lint-free towel.

    3) If no joy: polish off the scratches with Brasso; wash clean.
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  3. Try DVD Fab HD Decrypter. It took a while, but it did muscle through some slightly scratched I have.

    Or you could also try having the discs resurfaced. My local "Mom & Pop" video rental store recently used their machine and saved my out-of-print 101 Dalmations DVD for only $2.50. It looks like new and plays perfectly.
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  4. Always Watching guns1inger's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2004
    Location: Miskatonic U
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    Originally Posted by RowMan
    Try DVD Fab HD Decrypter. It took a while, but it did muscle through some slightly scratched I have.

    Or you could also try having the discs resurfaced. My local "Mom & Pop" video rental store recently used their machine and saved my out-of-print 101 Dalmations DVD for only $2.50. It looks like new and plays perfectly.
    Just be aware that many of these work by polishing down to a level below the depth of the scratch. It usually works once, but it is like getting your disc brakes machined - eventually they are too thin to work. So use it once to rescue the disc, then make a copy and put the original away to preserve it.
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  5. Member oldandinthe way's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2006
    Location: With the other crabapples
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    Owning your own polishing machine costs about $20.

    Any ripper which allows continuous retries might work not just DVDFab.
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  6. Member fritzi93's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2003
    Location: U.S.
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    Originally Posted by oldandinthe way
    Any ripper which allows continuous retries might work not just DVDFab.
    DVDDecrypter, for example. Tools -> Settings -> I/O. Check "Ignore Read Errors", and set desired number of read error retries.

    I forget how many retries DVDFabDecrypter does, seven perhaps? That's the number that comes to mind. If you want to recover as much as possible, set retries in DVDDecrypter higher (than seven) and let it run overnight. Depends on the disc whether this is worthwhile or not; multiple retries *may* recover a good bit of data, in my experience. Or set the retries to one or two to plow through the disc faster.
    Pull! Bang! Darn!
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  7. Member Dv8ted2's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2005
    Location: OA
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    ISObuster should also work if you want to try that route. ISObuster often will recover damaged discs.
    Believing yourself to be secure only takes one cracker to dispel your belief.
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  8. Brasso does work. so does toothpaste (the white kind [more abrasives], NOT gel). have used both with great success.

    the "old" DVDDecrypter is very good, at times better the DVD Fab for recovering info from a scratched disc. example...tried ripping my scratched AVP with Fab this week and it stopped at 54.58% completion. tried DVDDecrypter and in 86 minutes had the files. then I shrunk w/Shrink, burned with Nero...perfect backup copy.

    good luck.
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  9. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
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    New software rarely helps. What you face is a hardware problem.

    Cleaning a disc is often more damaging than helpful. Toothpaste, scrubbing, do-it-yourself cleaner devices ... these almost never work.

    You need a drive that reads better. Most drives read poorly.

    Another option is to manually make the drive read at a real-time speed. This often means slower than 1x (0.25 to 0.5x read speed). This is done by using settings in some software. Most of them only go down to 1x in the settings, but it'll read slower if it has to.

    You can also rip a disc manually, extracting data file by file (or even sector by sector in an IFO read mode, doing one chapter at a time). A pain, but worth time if the data is that important.
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  10. Member AlanHK's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2006
    Location: Hong Kong
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    Originally Posted by lordsmurf
    New software rarely helps. What you face is a hardware problem.

    Cleaning a disc is often more damaging than helpful. Toothpaste, scrubbing, do-it-yourself cleaner devices ... these almost never work.
    Of course it's a "hardware problem". And one piece of hardware is the disc. If it has a scratch, light cannot pass through that part of the surface to read the data below. So remove (or fill in ) the scratch to make a smooth surface the laser can pass through. The disc is already damaged before you try that. Of course, this disc will not be as good as new, but it may be readable, at least for a while, long enough to back it up.


    And it IS also a software problem. Or do you "read" discs with a microscope and write the data with a quill pen? You need some software that deals with errors without just giving up or crashing. I've had success with Isopuzzle. It makes a portable data file so you combine data read from more than one drive.
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