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  1. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
    Location: United States
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    I have several DTS 5.1 music CDs and DVDAs which play in my car. DVD player in the house does not support these formats. Is there a way I can rip the DTS audio files from the CD and/or DVDA, then create a DVD with a menu to play the DTS files on my surround sound system?

    I know it's possible, because several of my DVDAs play on my DVD player as if they are DVDs. They have information in the VIDEO_TS folder so they can act as a DVD or DVDA. The problem is, if I want to author my own "audio DVD" how can I do it? I've used Adobeman's DVDA creator to make DVDA's, but they won't play on a DVD player.

    I tried Nero Vision, but AC3 is the only audio option, and I wanted to use the original DTS. I also tried creating an AVI file with the 5.1 DTS tracks as the background music, but just got static when I tried them in the DVD player.
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  2. Always Watching guns1inger's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2004
    Location: Miskatonic U
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    If the DTS tracks are DVD compliant (i.e. 48kHz) then DVD Lab Pro can be used to author a DVD Video with DTS audio. I don't know how you rip the DTS audio from a DVD Audio disc.

    DTS CDs are different again, as they are usually encoded at 44.1 kHz, which is not DVD compliant and cannot be authored into a DVD Video.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
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    DTS CDs are not "usually" encoded at 44.1 KHz, they are ALWAYS encoded at 44.1 KHz. In theory you could rip the DTS CD to your hard drive and convert it to 48 KHz for DVD authoring, but I know of no editing tools that will let you edit DTS tracks or even listen to them in playback, so you would be flying blind on the conversion to 48 KHz and maybe have to author a DVD before you know if your conversion worked or not.

    You can demux DTS tracks on DVD-Audio discs through a variety of rippers. The old DVD Decrypter can do it in IFO mode if you explicitly select Stream Processing and pick the correct audio stream to demux. DTS audio on DVD-Audio will always be in the VOB in the VIDEO_TS directory, so you treat it just like a normal DVD file in terms of demuxing it. The AUDIO_TS directory contains lossless DVD-Audio format audio of various types. Any DTS and AC3 tracks will always be in the VIDEO_TS directory for compatibility with standard DVD video players.

    DTS is not valid as the only audio option on DVD video. An authoring program may or may not let you make such discs, but you do need to be aware that according to the standards for DVD, DTS cannot be the only audio option on a DVD disc and you MUST have either AC3 or PCM audio in addition to DTS. I have never authored a DVD Audio disc, so I can offer no helpful hints for that.
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2007
    Location: United States
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    Thank you both for your answers. I posted this question on Doom9.org and got no useful information.

    I am able to listen to DTS audio on my PC using foobar2000, and I think you can convert the files to 48khz with it. From what you're saying it seems I'd also have to put AC3 encoded audio on the disc?

    Assuming I can figure out how to generate the AC3 and 48 khz DTS files, do you know of an authoring tool I can use to create the disc? I'm less concerned about the video, but if it's required I can put a graphic up. The Donal Fagan DVD I have works as a DVD or DVDA, and has a track listing and menu. So apparently it can be done...
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  5. Always Watching guns1inger's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2004
    Location: Miskatonic U
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    For a DVD Video to be compliant, yes, you must have a second audio track that is either AC3 or PCM. That said, I have a few discs that I have stripped all the audio but the DTS soundtrack, and they all play fine (obviously you must have a DTS enabled amp and digital connection to do this).

    DVD Lab Pro is one of the few reasonably priced authoring tools that supports DTS audio tracks.

    AC3 encoding is pretty simple, with either ffmpggui or Aften capable of doing it. Aften will also do 5.1, whereas ffmpeggui is limited to 2 channels.

    I don't know of a freeware DTS encoder, so Surcode is probably the place to start looking, although there are others. You will have to have demuxed your source back to 6 mono files, and upsampled them to 48kHz.
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