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  1. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2006
    Location: Israel
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    Hello,
    I connected my PC to my LCD TV using the D-SUB port.
    I have windows-XP OS and I am using windows media player.
    When I play movies ( divx ) I get vertical line on the video playback screen.
    Playing with my Linux OS do not have the same problem.
    It looks like a setting issue because when I change the vidoe accelaration setting in the windows media player the video is clear but I have performace problems playing the video smothly.

    Can you help me please ?

    David
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2005
    Location: UK
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    Do you have the same line when you play back in window and full screen, what screen resolutions are you using? Have you tryed other players?
    Cann't tell it's possible don't tell anything.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2006
    Location: Israel
    Search Comp PM
    The resulotion is 1024x740
    The line apears also in full-mode
    I tried :
    - mplayer
    - official divx

    I will try the vlc player.
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2005
    Location: England, UK
    Search Comp PM
    Hey, I have a question for you. I've been meaning to use an HDTV either 23/26" (or maybe even 32") to hook up a computer to (Mac Mini). How is the picture. Is it just as good as using a normal monitor, and is the text etc. readable?

    Thanks.
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  5. Member edDV's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Northern California, USA
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    Originally Posted by Zak
    Hey, I have a question for you. I've been meaning to use an HDTV either 23/26" (or maybe even 32") to hook up a computer to (Mac Mini). How is the picture. Is it just as good as using a normal monitor, and is the text etc. readable?

    Thanks.
    Depends on the LCD-TV. The better ones have 1366x768 native LCD resolution and VGA inputs that accept WXGA (1366x768).

    The larger screen sizes mean larger pixels than say a 1280x768 computer monitor so you might need to move it back a few feet for text to look the same.

    Also, some LCD-TV screens will have TV gamma that is more optimal for dark room viewing. These may appear dark in office lighting.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2005
    Location: England, UK
    Search Comp PM
    The TV I'm currently looking at has a 1366 x 768 resolution, and I believe the following are for PC connection?
    PC D-sub ( + Mini Stereo ): 1EA
    Monitor out, L/R: 1EA
    I don't know much about VGA inputs...take a look at the TV here. Any ideas as to whether it may be good or not?
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  7. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    For a TV, this seems to be a good match. Nice contrast, 8ms repsonse time is OK.

    However, for anyone serious about using an LCD TV as a computer monitor, you should look at a 1080p television. I'd say that at 720p (1366x768 or more correctly 1280x740) would be less than optimal. The extra resolution of 1920x1080 would be more likely what you would expect on a usable and efficient desktop.

    Whatever you get, you should be sure to use the native resolution of the monitor/TV. For the TV that Zak is listing, this would be 1366x768. daviddb, you don't list yours but hopefully you get the gist of what I'm saying.

    I've got a 19" 4:3 display at 1280x1024 and find it perfect for the size. Remember, you normally look at a monitor at much shorter distance that you do a TV.

    I recently picked up a 42" LCD TV for just that, TV viewing. However, knowing that I would hook it up to the PC, as I do now, I got a 1080p. For some strange reason its looks better setting my display card to 1920x1200 vs 1920x1080. I think its got something to do with the VESA specs, not sure. Just know it looks better. For giggles, I set the display to 1280x720 and didn't like the loss of desktop space from 1920x1200. VERY noticable. (I'm sitting about 10-12 feet away for discussions sake)
    Have a good one,

    neomaine

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  8. Member edDV's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2004
    Location: Northern California, USA
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    Two other issues:

    The YPbPr and DVI-D inputs will probably overscan 5-10% so you will loose the edges of your desktop unless your graphics card can scale the desktop. This scaling will slighlty blur your desktop. Older display cards won't all do this zoom or do it poorly. Check your graphics card modes.

    Second, some to many LCD-TV sets don't support VESA (computer) resolutions over the DVI-D connector. They may force you to use 720x480p, 720x576p, 1280x720p or 1920x1080i. If true for this TV, your display card would need to support these modes. The progressive inputs would need scaling in the monitor to 1366x768 native resolution which is another potential for blur. Interlace 1080i should be avoided since it would require deinterlace in the monitor. Download the manual for the monitor and review the supported resolutions. Best would be 1366x768p but this would still get overscanned.

    For the above reasons, some LCD-TV makers offer a VGA "computer port" that supports VESA resolutions like 1024x768, 1280x768, or best 1366x768 WXGA which matches the native panel resolution without scaling. The "computer port" usually does not overscan so it works more like a computer monitor.
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: United States
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    Even with the info given by edDV, I still would not recommend a 720p tv for computer usage. Perhaps I just like all the available desktop and maybe my eyes haven't gone bad yet, but the 720ish resolutions just don't cut it for me, even on a 19" monitor. Going larger (as in, displayed fonts) makes it even worse. I like a full (as in, filled with information) screen as much as possible. I hate having to scroll if I don't have to. The higher the resolution, the more desktop.

    I still recommend a 1080p TV if you'll be using it for TV and as a computer monitor. Just remember, all the hardware and resolution information still pertains. To get true computer monitor like functions on a display whose primary focus is TV, make sure that you have a VGA port and a video card that can support the display. There may not be much difference to the eye between a 720p display and 1080p display for TV, but for a computer, it gives you the option of almost twice as much desktop to work with.

    For the video card, I be hard pressed to find anything that couldn't handle it at the most basic level. If your only use will be email, word processing, simple browsing...virtually any 64mb or better card should do it. If you like the more recent graphically intensive games or anything with high resolutions and acceptable refresh rates, plan accordingly. I'd start with a 256mb and work from there. I just picked up an ATI 9600xt w/256mb for $55 on eBay. $75 if you want brand new. I'm sure there are similar good buys. (The XT gives it an FM receiver but that's not really the important point, it has 20% faster GPU than a similar 9600...)
    Have a good one,

    neomaine

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  10. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    Just to add a point I forgot...

    For those with an older style LCD, or any other type of monitor for that matter, that doesn't have a VGA port but does have a component, you can get the component adapter for an ATI card.

    Though not perfect, it should still work. You'd have to make sure you match your video card display to the tv or monitor's resolution and sync. There's a piece of software that assists with this. Haven't used it, but it available in tools. Forgot what it is off hand. I'm search a quick search could pull it up. I'm sure someone could rattle it off the top of the head...
    Have a good one,

    neomaine

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  11. Member MOVIEGEEK's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2002
    Location: CA,USA
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    Originally Posted by neomaine
    Just to add a point I forgot...

    For those with an older style LCD, or any other type of monitor for that matter, that doesn't have a VGA port but does have a component, you can get the component adapter for an ATI card.

    Though not perfect, it should still work. You'd have to make sure you match your video card display to the tv or monitor's resolution and sync. There's a piece of software that assists with this. Haven't used it, but it available in tools. Forgot what it is off hand. I'm search a quick search could pull it up. I'm sure someone could rattle it off the top of the head...
    ATI DVI->component adapter:
    http://www.shop4tech.com/?go=view_item&id=5062&r=183
    ATI & nVidia: PowerStrip
    nVidia: TVTool

    This thread really should be a sticky
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  12. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2006
    Location: Israel
    Search Comp PM
    Hello Guys I came back after long time with a solution I found:

    - I setup the refresh rate to 60Hz - did not help
    - I set the resolution to 800x600 - did not help
    - I used several video player - did not help
    - I change the video hardware accelation mode to diable the directmode and direct3D - video display OK

    Why this happens is this problem is related to the directX ?

    My linux box is using a framebuffer mode and it works fine.

    Regrads,
    David.
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  13. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: United States
    Search Comp PM
    Thanks, MOVIEGEEK!
    Have a good one,

    neomaine

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