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  1. I am using the title slides in Adobe Premiere Pro 1.5 to create subtitles for a film I am making (its the easiest method for the moment because the film is being edited at the same time as subtitle creation - dont ask!!).

    Can anyone reccomend what the best font for subtitle text is, thats readable on a TV screen.

    At the moment I have two lines of text with no more than 40 characters on each line, for each subtitle slide, if you get me.

    Any other reccomendations on colour, antialiasing etc etc are welcome.
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: NJ
    Search Comp PM
    IF you have it/can find it....

    AG Foreigner-Roman seems pretty good for subtitles. It's the closest I can find to the font Bandai uses for their DVDs (If anyone knows the name of that font PLEASE, PLEASE contact me! I'm going insane trying to find the font that they're using!) and it's very easy to read. I've used it on a couple of things I've subtitled and I've yet to find a font that works better than AG Foreigner-Roman when subtitling videos.

    Also, a few quick tips:

    - Avoid serif fonts (e.g. Times New Roman) -- ALL SERIF FONTS, especially Times New Overrated.

    - Times New Overrated, Borial, and HELLvetica should be banned, permenantly. (I'll let you figure out what these are, if you have a PC they should be pre-loaded.)

    - Don't make the text too large or you'll have "dancing logo syndrome" (e.g. screen bugging) -- keep it out of the overscan box, and size the text so that it's a fairly decent size on a TV Screen. Use up to two lines-- THREE MAX to a subtitle. Anymore than three lines on one screen is too many and ugly, anymore than two should only be used if you really need to break a line or have two people talking at once.

    - Don't use fonts that are excessively wide (e.g. ADVs typefont used in Neon Genesis Evangelion) or suck up alot of screen space, these are ugly and hard to read.

    Hope this helps.
    ~Cyrax9~
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  3. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: Want my advice? PM me.
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    Sans serif fonts.
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Jan 2004
    Location: Brazil
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    flickerx
    I usually use Trebuchet MS Bold, size 18. Very elegant font, with a clean design, but still carries some sutil graphic elements to differentiate all letters, like the lower case L to the upper case I. Makes it very good to read.

    As for style, I always use white font, with black border and shadow, but that is more of a personal choice. But colors usually are either white or yellow.

    Cyrax9
    If you can get a good, clean screenshot of the font, you can try to identify it on this site: http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/
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  5. I agree on Trebuchet MS. I used it with textual subtitles. By the way, what do you guys think about Deja Vu Sans? It looks pretty good on the screen.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2010
    Location: India
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    Well, I'm a late comer to this thread.
    However I'd like to share my experience with subtitle fonts.

    The font that resemples closest to Blu-ray font is Levenim MT (looks bawdy when in BOLD).

    The next closest is Advantage Demi http://www.fontpalace.com/font-download/Advantage+Demi/

    I experimented with Forgotten Futurist Shadow 3-D font in Lime color and liked it too http://www.fontpalace.com/font-category/3D+Fonts/5/

    Personally, I prefer Tahoma, it shows all symbols , especially, those musical note symbols.
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  7. vanished El Heggunte's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2009
    Location: Misplaced Childhood
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    Originally Posted by ConverterCrazy View Post
    Personally, I prefer Tahoma, it shows all symbols , especially, those musical note symbols.
    Yes, Tahoma is a somewhat-decent font, certainly much better than Borial or Hellvetica

    You could give a try to Droid Sans, or even to Consolas ( assuming you think monospaced fonts are OK for subtitles, I know some people don't think so, anyway I don't see the reason why they are good for CJK text but "bad" for Western languages )

    Originally Posted by ConverterCrazy View Post
    Well, I'm a late comer to this thread.
    However I'd like to share my experience with subtitle fonts.

    The font that resemples closest to Blu-ray font is Levenim MT (looks bawdy when in BOLD).

    The next closest is Advantage Demi http://www.fontpalace.com/font-download/Advantage+Demi/

    I experimented with Forgotten Futurist Shadow 3-D font in Lime color and liked it too http://www.fontpalace.com/font-category/3D+Fonts/5/
    Fancy-designed fonts MAY look good on ads, banners, T-shirts, whatever, but I doubt they may ever look OK on subtitles.
    As for the other clones of Arial and Helvetica... seriously, IMHO we don't need more fonts that make no distinction between "I", "l" or/and "1"
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Apr 2010
    Location: India
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    Choice of fonts is very personal.

    I used monospace font for their directness & impersonal look as in Government/Official circulars.

    I use Tahoma for its cute appearance and apparently larger size look (also for subtitles)

    I use Verdana for convenience of reading

    And I use Times New Roman (at least 12pt) for its classic literary looks to write poetry

    Papa, he loves Mama
    Mama, she loves Papa

    And to write prose

    Once upon a time, there was a beautiful Princess..

    I could use other SanSerif fonts, if they didn't confuse 'I' for 'l' and vice versa.

    Just sharing information - not setting standards.
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  9. Hey, I know this is a very late reply, and I don't expect the PM to reply, but this came up in top Google search when I was looking for the same thing as the PM. The PM was correct about text having possibility for outlining which makes them MUCH MORE VISIBLE. In windows Movie Maker you have "outlining" to the furthest right when you have a text/font selected, where you can select thickness and color of the outlining (if the text is a different color than black, then make it black for very good visibility). I was not able to figure this out anywhere and just stumbled upon it by accident. This is why I post it here so the word hopefully spreads or that people in the future sees this so they don't have to struggle as much to get this as I did.
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  10. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2011
    Location: India
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by ConverterCrazy View Post
    ....Tahoma, it shows all symbols , especially, those musical note symbols.
    Thanks. Just what I was looking for.
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