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  1. Hi there,

    I did a search and found a couple of tips on how to change the aspect ratio of an .m2v file from 4x3 to 16x9, but the tips didn't seem to work on a multiplexed MPEG 2. So, I'm hoping someone will be able to help me out.

    Background:
    I have an HDTV box that sends a 480i (4:3) signal to my EyeTV 200 which records at 720x480 MPEG2 (DVD Quality).

    The EyeTV sees this as a 4:3 signal as it should. However, the only aspect-ratio options I have when recording 16:9 formatted transmissions are: Letterbox, Chopped Sides or Squeezed. The first two options don't allow me to have full-screen, full picture display on my 16:9 TV.

    The third option (squeezed) is a bit of a kludge but I can see full screen playback. I do this by stretching the squeezed 4:3 recording in VLC or by dropping the MPEG2 file into Sizzle and burning to DVD, using the 16:9 format option. I can also set the TV's VGA display to a 4x3 format (1024x768) and stretch the display using the TV's 'fullscreen' option.

    What I'd like to do is re-format EyeTV's MPEG2 export to a 16:9 format which would simply re-strech the sqeezed format back to it's original widescreen display.

    I've tried the following:
    - Change the aspect ratio in PullDownX (doesn't recognize the file + there are some GUI glitches).
    - Tried messing around with YadeX (tried on a read/write VIDEO_TS folder and couldn't get to the edit part). Probably wouldn't work on a MPEG2 file anyways.
    - Tried HEX editing the MPEG2 header information in various ways from documentation available by searching the web, but this was unsuccessful as well.

    I haven't tried some of the more esoteric tools like ffmpegx but would be willing to if they'd do what I want below.

    What I'd like to do:
    - I really just want to be able to change the aspect ratio of an exported multiplexed MPEG2 fie from 4:3 to 16:9 while maintaining the single-file format. I realize that I could demux the file and work on the .m2v stream in PullDownX but really just want a simple way of changing the aspect-ratio on the existing file, avoiding too much hassle.

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

    VVid
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2001
    Location: Silver Spring, MD USA
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    The 16:9 flag is for 4:3 television display only. The DVD player automatically assumes a 16:9 VOB will be stretched horizontally by the 16:9 television monitor. If you never intend to view your 16:9 EyeTV recordings on a computer or 4:3 television, you don't need to set the 16:9 flag.

    However, what I do, when I want to ensure proper display on a 4:3 television (and/or Apple DVD Player), I author the DVD then open the Video_TS folder in myDVDedit and set the aspect of relevant title sets and menus to 16:9 and then Save.
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  3. Originally Posted by AntnyMD
    The 16:9 flag is for 4:3 television display only. The DVD player automatically assumes a 16:9 VOB will be stretched horizontally by the 16:9 television monitor. If you never intend to view your 16:9 EyeTV recordings on a computer or 4:3 television, you don't need to set the 16:9 flag.
    Hi ANtnyMD,

    Thing is, I do want to view the EyeTV recordings on a computer. Right now by default they're recording/playing back in a 4:3 format (because the HD receiver only outputs 480i to the S-Video and Composite ports). I can letterbox the 16:9 HD signal coming from the receiver, chop the sides, or squeeze the display.

    Both Eye TV's software and VLC can stretch the recording to 16:9, but I'd really like a way to set this flag universally inside the MPEG making it portable and able to play at this aspect ratio in quicktime player or others without any special intervention.

    Any way to do this easily?
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  4. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2001
    Location: Silver Spring, MD USA
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    There may be a more simple way to get what you want, but for now I'd recommend:
    1. Author eyeTV content as a DVD
    2. Set 16:9 flag in the DVD authoring program (DVD Studio Pro), or setting the flag via myDVDedit.
    3. Use YadeX to rip the content out as a single MPEG.

    Good luck.
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  5. Originally Posted by AntnyMD
    There may be a more simple way to get what you want, but for now I'd recommend:
    1. Author eyeTV content as a DVD
    2. Set 16:9 flag in the DVD authoring program (DVD Studio Pro), or setting the flag via myDVDedit.
    3. Use YadeX to rip the content out as a single MPEG.

    Good luck.
    Thanks for the help AntnyMD! A bit convoluted but it'll work.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2004
    Location: Hawaii
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    Thanks for the educational topic.

    Originally Posted by VVid
    A bit convoluted but it'll work.
    Certainly not a process I'd want to repeat with every EyeTV recording.
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  7. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2001
    Location: Silver Spring, MD USA
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    Well it doesnt take as long as you think ... Especially since VVid just wants a final mpeg which will stretch to the proper aspect ratio in QuickTime ... Should take about ten minutes or less for every hour of eyeTV content thats proper DVD spec.
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  8. Originally Posted by sjk
    Thanks for the educational topic.

    Originally Posted by VVid
    A bit convoluted but it'll work.
    Certainly not a process I'd want to repeat with every EyeTV recording.
    Many of the EyeTV recordings don't need the aspect ratio to be changed as the channel's broadcasting a 4:3 signal. It's only HDTV recordings which need to be stretched back to 16:9. For the time being, I'm just archiving them to DVD in 16:9 format with Sizzle. I can always rip them back to .mpg's later if I need to.
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2004
    Location: Hawaii
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    Originally Posted by VVid
    Many of the EyeTV recordings don't need the aspect ratio to be changed as the channel's broadcasting a 4:3 signal. It's only HDTV recordings which need to be stretched back to 16:9.
    So it's an issue with 16:9 playback/archival of HDTV broadcasts you record with EyeTV 200 that aren't transmitted with a 4:3 signal?

    Hoping to understand this so I'm better prepared for a possibly similar setup here. Thanks!
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  10. Originally Posted by sjk
    So it's an issue with 16:9 playback/archival of HDTV broadcasts you record with EyeTV 200 that aren't transmitted with a 4:3 signal?

    Hoping to understand this so I'm better prepared for a possibly similar setup here. Thanks!
    Yes, it's a bit hard to visualize. It's really a standards issue (note that the HDTV standard (720p and 1080i) is by definition always a 16:9 aspect. That's why you see those grey bars around 4:3 video on some HDTV broadcasts).

    What's going on is:
    1. The EyeTV has RF (cable), composite and S-Video inputs.
    2. My HD receiver outputs composite Pr,Pb,Y (at SDTV and HDTV resolutions) - this is hooked up to my TV. The receiver also has two composite outputs (yellow video connector + audio). One of those goes to the EyeTV. The other goes to the TV, for stereo audio only. The receiver's S-Video out goes to the EyeTV as well (bit better video quality).

    The connections to the EyeTV from the HD receiver only support the the 480i, or SDTV, format which is by definition 4:3. The EyeTV, therefore, encodes the recording at 720x480 4:3.

    This means when I want to record a HDTV broadcast, the true 16:9 format is manipulated by the receiver in order to be sent to the EyeTV at the 480i format. But one of the receiver's options when watching HDTV through the non-HD output is to 'squeeze' the 16:9 format into 4:3.

    This is why I have to stretch the recordings back to their true aspect ratio.

    Now there may be receivers out there that send HD signals through the standard TV ports at their original aspect ratio and if so the EyeTV may be able to recognize this and encode properly (not too familiar with the S-Video standard).

    However, this is certainly one way to get the most from the EyeTV 200 and HDTV programming.

    Hope that's not too confusing.

    VVid
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  11. What we need is something like this program for Windows *spit* called

    DVD Patcher.


    A bit of misnomer, it patches the header on MPEG files without requiring a reencode.

    http://www.videohelp.com/tools?toolsearch=dvd+patcher&SUBMIT=Search


    In my case I record 16x9 output from a HDTV set top box to my 4x3 ReplayTV recorder. The resulting MPEGs incorrectly have a 4x3 flag that need to be set to 16x9 so that software players like VLC automatically play the video with the correct ratio.

    TIM

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A little more further searching I came across this for Macs.... (worth a try... it's freeeee!)

    http://www.qtsync.com/qtsync.php
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  12. Originally Posted by VVid
    I've tried the following:
    - Change the aspect ratio in PullDownX (doesn't recognize the file + there are some GUI glitches).
    [...]
    What I'd like to do:
    - I really just want to be able to change the aspect ratio of an exported multiplexed MPEG2 fie from 4:3 to 16:9 while maintaining the single-file format. I realize that I could demux the file and work on the .m2v stream in PullDownX but really just want a simple way of changing the aspect-ratio on the existing file, avoiding too much hassle.
    [s:3a39c4460b]to avoid demux, you can use my soft (see my sign). You'll find a demo version (but access to this tool is free for non-registred users). Menu item: "Windows -> Tools..."
    You could modify aspect ratio wihout demultiplexing the stream.[/s:3a39c4460b]

    bye

    Edit: sorry, I forgot my code (no access with multiplexed streams for non-registred users), you must demux first.
    For DVD, iPad, HD, Western Digital, iMovie & FCPX? New: MovieConverter-Studio 2 is available! - Handle your camcorder's videos? in 60p too? do a slow-motion? MovieCam
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